Nick Mason gets no respect

Messages
200
For a long time Ringo was kind of scorned as the guy who was lucky to be with more talented guys. Now that's changed and with good reason.

But Nick Mason remains, to my mind, the one drummer in a hugely, hugely successful band who gets like zero respect from musicians, at least from what I've seen. People talk endlessly about Gilmour, Waters and even all the cool parts that Wright added. As if Floyd somehow become a huge, world-famous band despite Mason.

But when I listen to their music I hear a lot of great, tasty parts. Great feel. He can be subtle, creative, and he has some cool chops too. I just don't get it. Why is this guy not considered one of the more important drummers of his generation?
 

(Something)

Member
Messages
3,317
For a long time Ringo was kind of scorned as the guy who was lucky to be with more talented guys. Now that's changed and with good reason.

But Nick Mason remains, to my mind, the one drummer in a hugely, hugely successful band who gets like zero respect from musicians, at least from what I've seen. People talk endlessly about Gilmour, Waters and even all the cool parts that Wright added. As if Floyd somehow become a huge, world-famous band despite Mason.

But when I listen to their music I hear a lot of great, tasty parts. Great feel. He can be subtle, creative, and he has some cool chops too. I just don't get it. Why is this guy not considered one of the more important drummers of his generation?
Because there is little to no flash. He's perfectly suited to his role in Floyd, but doesn't stand out in the way Bonham, Peart, Moon, Baker, etc do. He really is like Ringo or Bill Wyman. I would say I'm a pretty familiar with Pink Floyd, but I can't for the life of me recall a Nick Mason part off the top of my head the way I can Bonham or Moon. Nick Mason was just kind of...there in support of Gilmour and Waters. Nothing wrong with that, though.
 
Messages
200
Because there is little to no flash. He's perfectly suited to his role in Floyd, but doesn't stand out in the way Bonham, Peart, Moon, Baker, etc do. He really is like Ringo or Bill Wyman. I would say I'm a pretty familiar with Pink Floyd, but I can't for the life of me recall a Nick Mason part off the top of my head the way I can Bonham or Moon. Nick Mason was just kind of...there in support of Gilmour and Waters. Nothing wrong with that, though.
I hear some subtle stuff, like the slow builds in "Shine On" but yeah, I don't think Nick ever did a big drum roll in the middle of a song.
 

Dubious

Member
Messages
2,155
i don't understand how the nick mason in live at pompei and the nick mason after are even the same dude?

nick completely DOMINATES that entire performance, a total BEAST of a drummer. Then it's like he put it away and never busted it out again.
 

tiktok

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
22,716
Like most successful bands, the chemistry was more important than getting the "best" guy in each position. Nick was the right guy for the job, and when he (rarely) wasn't, he stepped aside for session drummers.
 

Otto Tune

Member
Messages
3,841
Nick Mason never overplayed. Drummers don't have to be maniacs.
Mason wore long sleeve white shirts, and looked like he never broke a sweat, yet his drumming was spot on.

Today, he spends his time racing historic Ferraris. Yikes!
 

Waylander

Member
Messages
703
Nick was the perfect rhythmic foundation for the Floyd Sound. There was no need for any flashiness behind the Kit. Gilmour did enough of it.

But he did a very substantial part outside the Floyd: Inside out
 

Lance

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
10,750
I think one of his best attributes is playing behind the beat. It really gives it that Floydian angst. Especially slower songs like Hey You. Why he isn't more infamous, I have no idea. One of my favs from those era bands.
 

Ricardo P

Member
Messages
948
Actually he was the one that drove me to listen to Pink Floyd for that intro in the song Time. That tom toms phrases was the spark of curiosity for listening to more serious music and buy DSOTM. Which was the first record I bought.

I still think he's playing fits the band sound character perfectly and yes, he is very underestimated
 

Papanate

Member
Messages
19,854
For a long time Ringo was kind of scorned as the guy who was lucky to be with more talented guys.
But Nick Mason remains, to my mind, the one drummer in a hugely, hugely successful band who gets like zero respect from musicians,
I don't buy into that. The kinds of people who scorned Ringo and/or Nick Mason are
likely to be bedwetters who have never played professionally in their lives.
I heard that kind of crap about Charlie Watts too. And later it was Larry Mullen Jr. of U2.
All those guys are non showy pocket drummers that impart soul to simple parts.

I heard the comments mostly in the 1970s when big bombastic drummers were all the rage or inversely
clinical technicians who could play articulate paradiddles at 580 BPM abounded. When people woke
up to how well those drummers fit into the musical landscape they lived in - all the hooey
went by the wayside - among professionals.

Speaking of brilliant drummers - look up quotes from Carl Palmer about Ringo.
He has a lot of nice things to say - and Palmer is quite the drummer.
 

jmp2204

Member
Messages
397
Nick fit in the band perfectly; old friends with Waters and Wright, and he got along with everyone. Read his book Inside/Out, he says he was like the ship's cook, keeping things going below deck while the other's hashed it above. His sense of humor and probably some detachment from some of the proceedings helped him be a little bit of the 'lukewarm water' between Dave and Roger. Also a smart businessman and and excellent resource. He put up his Ferrari for cash to fund part of the first Momentary Lapse tour. Smart investment. IMHO, no one else could have been the drummer for Pink Floyd. Oh, and BEST rock drummer moustache of the 70s!

Can I have a slice of apple pie, without the crust?
 

fredgarvin

Member
Messages
11,222
He's just not a top level drummer, in comparison to Bobby Caldwell, Aynsley Dunbar, Tony Newman or other top drummers of the time. He's servicable.
 

aussie_owner

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
3,126
Nick fit in the band perfectly; old friends with Waters and Wright, and he got along with everyone. Read his book Inside/Out, he says he was like the ship's cook, keeping things going below deck while the other's hashed it above. His sense of humor and probably some detachment from some of the proceedings helped him be a little bit of the 'lukewarm water' between Dave and Roger. Also a smart businessman and and excellent resource. He put up his Ferrari for cash to fund part of the first Momentary Lapse tour. Smart investment. IMHO, no one else could have been the drummer for Pink Floyd. Oh, and BEST rock drummer moustache of the 70s!

Can I have a slice of apple pie, without the crust?
Sorry, all we have is the round pies, not the square ones.
 

DRS

Member
Messages
11,751
He's probably the least essential part of the band's sound than any of the above-mentioned dudes.
He's just not a top level drummer, in comparison to Bobby Caldwell, Aynsley Dunbar, Tony Newman or other top drummers of the time. He's servicable.
In math 3+2=5, but in music 3+2 doesn't always =5.
Aynsley Dunbar - in Pink Floyd? Really?
 




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