No more Wah

Discussion in 'Effects, Pedals, Strings & Things' started by P-TownClubDog, Feb 19, 2009.

  1. P-TownClubDog

    P-TownClubDog Member

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    I have an original cry baby and it stopped "wah" ing. Any suggestions on what the problem is? Potentiometer, capacitor, etc...???
     
  2. dewey decibel

    dewey decibel Supporting Member

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    You should give us more details. Does it still bypass the signal? When engaged does it make any noise at all? If so, what does it do? Did it turn into a volume pedal? Etc...
     
  3. Brettski

    Brettski Member

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    Open that sucker up! Did the little plastic rack gear slip out of place?
     
  4. P-TownClubDog

    P-TownClubDog Member

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    When I engage it it is silent. And it is not the battery!
     
  5. P-TownClubDog

    P-TownClubDog Member

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    Ive opened it up and everthing is normal.
     
  6. Blurillaz

    Blurillaz Member

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    I have one too and sometimes the jacks get all mucked up. Did you check them or move the cables while playing?
     
  7. P-TownClubDog

    P-TownClubDog Member

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    I have done all the preliminary trouble shooting, connections, battery, jacks and everything checks out. That is why I am wondering if there is a component that typically goes bad such as a cap or a potentiomer.
     
  8. P-TownClubDog

    P-TownClubDog Member

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    If you check here tomorrow I will give you as many specifics as possible. It's been a while since it went tits up and so I dont remember all the symptoms. I seem to remember it went silent.

    I have been modding my old strats and am in the zone with the soldering iron, so Im thinking of other repairs I need to do and this one occured to me.

    Thanks for the reply
     
  9. P-TownClubDog

    P-TownClubDog Member

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    a really high pitched tone that doesnt change when I poke around. It only occurs when the pedal is engaged. When the pedal is bypassed the guitar signal comes through just fine.
     
  10. StompBoxBlues

    StompBoxBlues Member

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    Do you have a voltmeter? I'd check voltages from ground to different points. If you have a 9v battery in it, if there is an open somewhere, you will read 0 volts til you probe the other side where you will read 9 volts (or whatever the battery is putting out), if you have a short, you will read 0 volts all the way...

    It could be anything, but I would bet on either the transistors, or a capacitor, or a combination (it most likely is one component, but depending on what caused the problem...could be several).

    Another thing I would try, get some jumper wires with alligator clips on them, clip one end to the input + signal (tip) jack, and either use a kayboard with a key held down as input, or have someone play your guitar, or just keep hitting strings now and then, point is to have signal coming in, take the other end and touch different points of the signal path, at some point if you hear (etiher wahed or not) the instrument coming through, but the point before it is just that high-pitch, it bears closer inspection right there.

    Another thing, if you take out the circuit board, with no battery, you can use an ohmeter to check all direct points (from component to component) to verify good connection.
     
  11. Wilson Effects

    Wilson Effects Member

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    Probably a transistor if the thing goes dead when engaged. If the pedal engages and only has high end probably a cap.
     
  12. bestegw

    bestegw Member

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    My Vox wah had problems with the footswitch, so if you have a multimeter you could easily check this by checking resistance between the two lugs (centre = in and out, other sides are on and off, you can trace from wiring). If engaged, it should be near zero, where disengaged gives you infinite resistance.

    Should this be the problem, than you'd have a great opportunity to mod the pedal to true bypass. See the Fulltone website on how to do this.

    Good luck and all the best!!

    Gerwin
     
  13. PremiumPlus

    PremiumPlus Member

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    What bestegw said.
    Typically the order of failure is:
    Switches
    Jacks, especially if soldered direct to a pcb. Resolder those.
    Connectors- battery, pcb
    capacitors
    resistors
    transistors, diodes (but usually only if they've been stressed with overvoltage or reverse polarity)
    Don't go poking around with a meter probe unless you know what voltages you're looking for. You are only likely to short a component to a voltage or ground which will make it fail...I speak from experience because I started poking around with probes in 1967.
    Usually you will find that the things that are physically stressed are what fails in stompboxes. Deoxit on the switches and connectors goes a long way to "repairing" these things!
     
  14. FenderBigot

    FenderBigot Supporting Member

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    I've owned 3 or 4 Cry-Baby's through the years... anytime one crapped out and wasn't in warranty, I just bought a new one. Aren't they only $79!?!?
     
  15. P-TownClubDog

    P-TownClubDog Member

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    I appreciate your philosophy. I feel this way about some things, but this pedal is the Thomas International 95-910511 and has some sentimental value to it.
     
  16. P-TownClubDog

    P-TownClubDog Member

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    I do have a volt meter, but my skills are stronger when I am replacing components or modifying circuits, but when it comes to checking voltages I get very confused between a schematic and the circuit board. I am considering sending it out for repair and spending the money. It has components I dont recognize from my circuit experience. I know the inductor, the resistors, diodes, but there are white cloth looking things that I assume are the caps, but im not sure.

    Thanks for all your replies.
     
  17. P-TownClubDog

    P-TownClubDog Member

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    Funny you should mention that because the first thing I found was a bad foot switch. I spent my evening lastnight finding a new one and after I put it in I had the same problem! I was bummed.
     
  18. elkym

    elkym Member

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    Sounds like a coupling cap/power filter cap issue to me.
     
  19. eclipseall

    eclipseall Member

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    My brother turnned on his cry baby on the other day and the swithch just broke. In done with cry babies, Morley wah seem to last for ever and no switches.
     
  20. StompBoxBlues

    StompBoxBlues Member

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    Well...like I say with just an alligator clipped wire on the signal input, touching points (especially if you have the schematic) and finding where signal finally passes when it is on could get you right to the failed part.

    As someone mentioned, coupling capacitors would be a good thing to check with this method...if it is opened you'd hear the signal before the cap, and not after.

    You could either post a photo (with description or arrows pointing to the part you are asking about) for the "cloth" things, but yeah, most likely caps. Capacitors can look like weird resistors, or like gumdrops, or like cannisters, etc. IF you have a schematic, also just start at the input signal, follow to the first component (most likely a cap) and identify the part...following the drawing and the circuit traces.

    I fixed a Tascam GT-1 using my friend had using the alligator clip method, and replaced...yup, the coupling cap. In fact at first the thing squealed too when I used just the wire to find the dead component...
     

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