noise gates? are you the keymaster?

Discussion in 'Effects, Pedals, Strings & Things' started by rollyfoster, Aug 22, 2008.

  1. rollyfoster

    rollyfoster Supporting Member

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    i'm having a major strat buzz issue at my practice space right now. they guy's house has some dirty, dirty power and there's some serious buzz and hum happening. my guitar's pretty quiet everywhere else.

    would running a noise gate in the FX loop help this or would i be better off with a power conditioner of some sort?
     
  2. Moe45673

    Moe45673 Member

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    Noise gates are only good when the noise is unbearable when you're not playing, but tolerable when you are
     
  3. jstone

    jstone Member

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    Very true.
    You could try to find a expander with a side chain. Sort of like a deesser with a broader specter . You might be able to use the side chain to eliminate only the worst of the sound while maintaining what is not noise.

    This is what i usually do in studio on mix of noisy guitar tracks.
     
  4. rollyfoster

    rollyfoster Supporting Member

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    that's pretty much what's going on. as soon as we stop there is some serious buzzing and humming going on. it's not a problem when i forget to roll the volume off. maybe i should get one just in case because i'll probably have the same issue somewhere down the road.
     
  5. rollyfoster

    rollyfoster Supporting Member

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    huh? a wha?
     
  6. rob2001

    rob2001 Member

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    You will run ito problems if your gigging alot for sure. That said, i'd just get used to rolling the guitar off. No need to have another piece of gear to deal with. How well are you shielded?

    Actually, a power conditioner would be a better investment. Might save an amp some day.
     
  7. rollyfoster

    rollyfoster Supporting Member

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    i've got more shielding than wolverine. foil on the guard and 3 coats of silver paint in the cavity (which was probably shielded at the factory).

    the rig's pretty quiet everywhere but this practice space. i think i'll probably get used to rolling the volume down since i'm training myself to use it more while playing, anyways.

    how would a power conditioner save an amp?
     
  8. Moe45673

    Moe45673 Member

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    the ISP Noise Decimator will do what you need to do to get rid of your noise. It's tailor made for your app (can't speak about any real or imagined long term damage to equipment, but for your immediate issues it will do it)
     
  9. rob2001

    rob2001 Member

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    Well, the better ones usually have surge protection too, There are varying degree's.

    Here's an example of where a good conditioner could have saved an amp. I have a 3 car detached garage I turned into a studio. There is 220 running to a pannel in the garage. One day I went out and turned the lights on and they were super bright, then they blew.

    Turns out the ground on the 220 went bad and basicly sent 220 to half if the pannel. If that would have happened with the amp on, it would have been fried. A good conditioner usually offers a level of surge protection that would have saved it. Fotunately I always unplug everything so I didn't loose anything. But heck, who knows what you'll run into at a gig!
     
  10. jstone

    jstone Member

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    An expander is an downwards compressor. You set it to reduce an amount of db NOT zero db as a gat. When a gate opens and closes it is almost on and off.
    A expander is only lowering the amount you set it to.. we can all survive a little noise. BUT not to loud :)

    A side chain lets you predefine what frequency you want the expander to work on and calculated its downwards compression from listening to that frequency so you can further fine tune how much db reduction you want from a specific frequency.

    Put to practice you find the frequency that is most noisy and by that trigger the expander to listen to the noise instead of what you are playing. The result will however be audible in what you plays as well as this is not a multiband tool but a full range thing.

    :)
    For this of you that don't get this never mind this is maybe not so common knowledge and might be coming from a part of my brain that is not that guitar friendly. But anyway this have I done oner and over again with great results... Maybe actually I will take the time to design one as well dedicated for guitar???

    Well time will show:)
     

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