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non standard scales over standard chord progressions

jjhaller

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
698
I'm looking to spice up the ingredients of my soloing. I've been studying melodic/harmonic minor as well as the diminished scale. If found the best way for me to learn is to practically apply what I'm learning.

Who has found ways to incorporate interesting sounds while playing standard chord progressions like we would find in contemporary music?

Thanks for your tips!
 

guitarjazz

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
22,905
I'm looking to spice up the ingredients of my soloing. I've been studying melodic/harmonic minor as well as the diminished scale. If found the best way for me to learn is to practically apply what I'm learning.

Who has found ways to incorporate interesting sounds while playing standard chord progressions like we would find in contemporary music?

Thanks for your tips!
Which kind of contemporary music do you play, son, country, or western?
Those scales can be used in jazz/funk/fusion/polka music. You'll find lots of harmonic and melodic minor in Bach. Ever play the Two-Part Inventions?
 

jjhaller

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
698
Which kind of contemporary music do you play, son, country, or western?
Those scales can be used in jazz/funk/fusion/polka music. You'll find lots of harmonic and melodic minor in Bach. Ever play the Two-Part Inventions?
No specific genre exactly. But I'm thinking mostly in the rock/pop/funk area. Looking for anyone that has made any discoveries, or has any tips!
 

Mark Robinson

Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
8,841
You can use the half/whole diminished on your way from the one up to the four in a dom blues setting.
 

Seraphine

Member
Messages
3,600
I'm looking to spice up the ingredients of my soloing. I've been studying melodic/harmonic minor as well as the diminished scale. If found the best way for me to learn is to practically apply what I'm learning.

Who has found ways to incorporate interesting sounds while playing standard chord progressions like we would find in contemporary music?

Thanks for your tips!
Listening to a lot of Grateful Dead would offer plenty, both in Bass thinking from Phil's playing to Rhythm amazing from Bobby to Jerry's filigree...

Archive.org has a lot of shows you can download...
http://www.archive.org/browse.php?collection=GratefulDead&field=year

Learn modes.. arps and etc etc.. learn them all over the fretboard top to bottom and link them ( not just box's )... This way you can play any of them ten ways from Sunday and use any approach to them to put you where you want to be on the neck at any given time, rather then being bound by a simple box.

Adorian over a D-C-G tune sounds nice...

Let's say there's a Emaj7-Bm-A progression, which is not normal, as it isn't found in any key.... Over the Emaj7 use D#dorian and land on the Bm ... it may sound strange at first, yet with a little work it fits, a number of ways... That should be an example of precisely what you're looking for...

a Gypsy minor scale works great over major progressions or chords...

*******
|----------------------------------11-12----|
|-----------------------9-10-12-13----------|
|----------------8-9-10---------------------|
|-------6-7-9-10----------------------------|
|---7-8-------------------------------------|
|-0-----------------------------------------|

*******
 

vhollund

Member
Messages
3,521
Alot of Pop/Funk is spiced already with jazz harmony
Throw us a song in here, and we will destroy it with a million strange sound suggestions
 

JSeth

Member
Messages
2,453
Half-tone whole-tone...

whole tone...

Using ANY arpeggio or other scale, first attack the note from 1/2 step below, then 1/2 step above, THEN the target note... start doing this SLOWLY, with a metronome, hitting all the rhythmic increments (1/4 note, 1/8, triplet, 16th), until you get the feel for it... gives a great "outside" sound to any line or transition... (also, the opposite works well - 1/2 step above, then below, then the target note...)

Another suggestion would be to play in the adjacent key for a phrase; a 1/2 step above or below the tonic key, then mimic the phrase in the tonic key (or not!).

Lots of fun to be had here, but, as with ANYTHING you play, do it with FULL INTENT... (or it will sound like you're wanking...)

play on....................................>
 

9fingers

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
7,916
a Gypsy minor scale works great over major progressions or chords...

*******
|----------------------------------11-12----|
|-----------------------9-10-12-13----------|
|----------------8-9-10---------------------|
|-------6-7-9-10----------------------------|
|---7-8-------------------------------------|
|-0-----------------------------------------|

*******
What major key/chord progression(s) with the scale in the chart?
 

gennation

Member
Messages
7,860
Check Earl Slick during the song Panic In Detroit on the David Live album (its only on the special edition release). The progression is Am-G-F-F, or basically a classic A Aeolian progression. The whole (lengthy) solo is A Blues and A Aeolian except for two points where Earl does his personal classic lick that uses A Dorian for killer against-the-beat outside off kilter sounding lick. He does the exact same lick during the Width Of A Circle on thd same album (although, WOAC is in Dorian, A Dorian on that album).

EDIT

The lick is at 3:48 in this vid clip:

The lick is this repeating three note group from A Dorian:

Code:
E--------------------------------------------------
B--------------12--------------12--------------12--
G------11--------------11--------------11----------
D--10------10------10------10------10------10------ keep repeating the lick
A--------------------------------------------------
E--------------------------------------------------
Of course "minor" is minor but this is a great example of how you can play an extended solo using one scale and then drop in an "outside" note/riff in the middle of using the other scale.

Kind of Blues So What is like that too. Mostly considered Dorian, but there's more going on than just a strict Dorian scale. It's a great Minor piece as much as it is a great Dorian piece.
 
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