Normal perfect picking

TomBLP

Member
Messages
119
100% pure conventional technique has worked over the years for so many great players. No reason to get too fancy. Just put in the effort and the results will come.
 

guitarjazz

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
25,216
Pulled from another thread but appropriate for this forum.

No funny angles, no special pick or holding technique, no weird arm position, no wild moves and it works...very very well.
This looks like 100% pure conventional technique to me. Benchmark stuff.
Like watching Ernie Els hit a golf ball.
He's fantastic. He is doing a lot of pick and fingers. The way he does it is perfect.
 

Megatron

Member
Messages
1,633
Define 'funny angles'.

His pick flattens out quite a bit during the hybrid picking moves. But I see edge picking, DWPS and 2 way pick slanting. Very fine, quick moves. If you know what to look for they are there.
 

guitarjazz

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
25,216
Define 'funny angles'.

His pick flattens out quite a bit during the hybrid picking moves. But I see edge picking, DWPS and 2 way pick slanting. Very fine, quick moves. If you know what to look for they are there.
I guess the fact that the video is connected to Troy Grady's site would imply some slicker than snake snot picking, or he wouldn't mess with it.
 

Megatron

Member
Messages
1,633
I'm not a huge fan of everything he puts up there. But the 2 way pick slanting completely changed my playing. I created my own drills. I personally wouldn't purchase any other products. I got what I needed.
 
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Tone_Terrific

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
38,116
Define 'funny angles'.

His pick flattens out quite a bit during the hybrid picking moves. But I see edge picking, DWPS and 2 way pick slanting. Very fine, quick moves. If you know what to look for they are there.
Definitely controlled but the arc of the pick seems to follow the arc from his wrist with minimal manipulation. (hybrid picking simply moves his fingers into use from a neutral position, too)
Of course he does adjust to allow the pick to move over the stings without tucking under any string but the movement is only to serve the purpose and not quirky or unique.
His form follows function, neatly.
 

CubanB

Member
Messages
2,155
IMO picking isn't something that should require much thought. Best not to even look at your hand and let your ears be the guide. Play for long enough, and it'll end up being clean and working well for you. When I hear this clip, I hear a lot of interesting phrasing, note/scale choices and that for me personally, is a lot harder to replicate. As I don't play a lot of music in this style.

The hybrid/chicken pickin stuff I've never learned a lot of, but isn't it like most things? Start off slow, and speed it up over time? In building your style, it can be good to analyse things I guess. In terms of building the foundation. For years, I'd always drop the pick. I couldn't work out how hard to grip it. Everyone says to relax when playing but my hand would go so soft the pick would fall out. Finding the right amount of tension took years. After a while it becomes something where you never even think about it. Most of the faster/famous pickers will say that they don't even think about what they are doing. It's the left hand that's required a lot more analysis for me over the years, which even now am still trying to get more efficient movement and less tension. The other thing that helps picking is good left hand muting. It helps to hide any picking mistakes and takes the pressure off so to speak. The other was having a picking technique that could allow any string to be palm muted on a moments notice. At first, I could only palm mute the wound strings and the B and high E were tough.

In terms of angles or whatever, just find whatever fits your anatomy. That's why I prefer to not even look at my hand, as it's a feel thing and a sound thing and the rest takes care of itself. I enjoyed the video, he's a heck of a player.
 

mbetter

Member
Messages
801
IMO picking isn't something that should require much thought. Best not to even look at your hand and let your ears be the guide. Play for long enough, and it'll end up being clean and working well for you.

Either that, or you will just have crappy picking all of your life.
 

CubanB

Member
Messages
2,155
I don't really understand how one could have crappy picking all their life. Speed? Maybe. But accuracy or tone? It should just constantly evolve. And watching other people play and mimic their style doesn't help because picking needs to work based off the individual players anatomy. You can even ditch the pick, and just use fingers, play slow and still evolve to have good tone (in the picking). For blazing speeds? It gets harder as you get older but yeah. I guess the main thing I would say to anyone who is frustrated, is just try to chip away, don't think about it too much but try to be self critical and gradually improve areas you know that are weak.

Even legato can help (left hand accuracy and strength) because it takes the pressure off the right hand to be so accurate. The left hand muting covers up the right hand picking mistakes. A fun exercise can be to learn a song that you like that pinpoints the type of picking that you hate and spend 6-12 months gradually improving the song to where it sounds near the original, and within a few years.. it'll be automatic even when playing other songs. Depends on what kind of picking though. Virtuoso speeds like Andy James or Ywngie or Michael Angelo Batio? Some people would have to work 5-10 years to get that. But reasonable speeds having good accuracy and tone? Most people can achieve that in my opinion. Just be careful of the 60 page debates on tonewoods, they don't help much.
 

boo radley

Member
Messages
2,399
I don't really understand how one could have crappy picking all their life. Speed? Maybe. But accuracy or tone? It should just constantly evolve.

Out of curiosity, discounting the initial learning curve, has your typing ability evolved? Are you now much more accurate than you were a year ago? Two years ago? Mine hasn't evolved in any meaningful way, one bit over 25 years...I'm pretty much at the same plateau, with the same number of mistakes. If I'm heads-down working on something that involves intense writing, my speed and accuracy may pick up, but eventually it regresses to the mean.
 

CubanB

Member
Messages
2,155
Have never really kept track over the years, but speed has never really been a goal, I only try to type as fast as my thoughts can keep up. I do regularly type 4000-7000 word things out in one sitting, emails or other things like that but it's not really the speed that holds me back, rather.. it's knowing what to say.

The accuracy and grammar definitely improved over time of doing that. In the last year or two? Not sure, but definitely over the last 5 years. I can sort of see your point, but I've never really tried to type as fast as possible, for example.. to transfer something that's handwritten into a PC. There's those secretary ladies who can probably do that super quickly but for me that's never been a goal. My ability to type without looking at the keyboard definitely improved over the years. I can only say 100% for sure, that over time.. it didn't hold me back in anyway. I'm happy. I'm super analytical about guitar though, therefore I focus on the micro things, and then each micro thing when you zoom in on it and improve it.. eventually all of thse small things add up into a bigger thing (hopefully being a good guitar player). For typing, I've never tried to join a forum about it. I just like to keep up with my thoughts as I type them so that it's effortless the way that speaking is. Very similar to improvising on guitar actually. I probably have poor typing technique and there's always mistakes but it gets the job done. Typing out those 5000 word things would be a nightmare otherwise.

Probably taking all of this too seriously but I do see your point. I've just never really focussed on it the same way I have for guitar. Guitar gets focussed attention on micro details.. typing is half assed, with not super speed and only enough accuracy to avoid being frustrated. I wouldn't really see the point in typing faster than I can think of what to say, but for those secretary or translator types it might be useful. I guess we should just be glad we don't live 50 years ago, and have a backspace key instead of a typewriter and whiteout.
 




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