Not what I expected for my first Ding!

VJF

Member
Messages
1,556
I've taken the neck off of my 2011 '62 Hot Rod Strat probably a dozen times to adjust the truss rod with no issues and now this happened:



You can see where more finish could possibly flake off...should I do anything to keep it from spreading or just leave it alone?

It doesn't bother me as I don't see it when playing but I don't really want it to get worse.
 

59Bassman

Plank Cranker
Gold Supporting Member
Messages
3,076
My '52 Hot Rod tele has that problem as well. I've lost a bunch of finish around the neckplate as well as the neck pocket. Not much you can do about it.
 

Clark GriswoId

Looks Great. Little Full, Lotta Sap.
Silver Supporting Member
Messages
3,748
Maybe try to put a couple heavy coats of clear nail polish on it?

May prevent further flaking
 

onemoretime

Member
Messages
2,862
Here's what you do. Lay the guitar flat and remove the neck (carefully). Never rock it to remove, always just lift straight up holding the neck as close to the heel as possible. Do not try to turn it off holding further up the neck. The leverage twists the neck and does the damage.

With the neck removed, run a piece of masking tape down the edge of the inside of the neck pocket. Make the edge sit slightly higher than the edge of the body. Get some black Duplicolor ScratchFix (small tube) touch up paint at the auto parts store. Use the brush to drop the paint into the damaged area so that it is a blob higher and slightly overlapping the damaged area edge.

Let it dry and you will find the paint has shrunk (solvents evaporate), so fill it again. Do not brush, just use the brush to flow the paint into the damaged area like above. Repeat until the area is slightly overfilled and once dry, remove the tap.

Lightly sand with 400 grit wet sandpaper (also available at the auto parts store). Once the filled area is sanded nearly level, switch to 800 grit and then finish with 1600. Give it a buff with some ScratchOut or other polishing compound.

Here is the trick ... wrap your 400 grit dry paper around a popsicle stick or piece of paint stir stick and carefully sand the inside edge of the neck pocket until the paint fill is level with the sides also. You can continue to lightly sand the other paint overlapping on the sides of the neck pocket slightly so the neck doesn't bind when removing it from the neck pocket. Check to be sure you have a nice snug slip fit and you're done.
 

AaeCee

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
18,360
Here's what you do. Lay the guitar flat and remove the neck (carefully). Never rock it to remove, always just lift straight up holding the neck as close to the heel as possible. Do not try to turn it off holding further up the neck. The leverage twists the neck and does the damage.

With the neck removed, run a piece of masking tape down the edge of the inside of the neck pocket. Make the edge sit slightly higher than the edge of the body. Get some black Duplicolor ScratchFix (small tube) touch up paint at the auto parts store. Use the brush to drop the paint into the damaged area so that it is a blob higher and slightly overlapping the damaged area edge.

Let it dry and you will find the paint has shrunk (solvents evaporate), so fill it again. Do not brush, just use the brush to flow the paint into the damaged area like above. Repeat until the area is slightly overfilled and once dry, remove the tap.

Lightly sand with 400 grit wet sandpaper (also available at the auto parts store). Once the filled area is sanded nearly level, switch to 800 grit and then finish with 1600. Give it a buff with some ScratchOut or other polishing compound.

Here is the trick ... wrap your 400 grit dry paper around a popsicle stick or piece of paint stir stick and carefully sand the inside edge of the neck pocket until the paint fill is level with the sides also. You can continue to lightly sand the other paint overlapping on the sides of the neck pocket slightly so the neck doesn't bind when removing it from the neck pocket. Check to be sure you have a nice snug slip fit and you're done.
Awesome instructions!

I have one similar to that as well that needs this type of attention. How 'bout I just bring it over and let you do it? :aok
 

VJF

Member
Messages
1,556
Thanks, I appreciate the detailed instructions but since I've never painted a guitar before, I'm afraid I would probably make it look worse. I would much prefer to pay someone with experience to do what you described.
 

Khromo

Member
Messages
1,017
A lot of times that happens because the original finish "rolled over" the edge of the pocket when it was shot, creating a bulging surface and a very tight fit right at the top edge of the pocket. This fat slug of finish will sometimes snap off when the neck is removed or put back in.

I like to file or sand this surface flat on guitars where the problem exists. It is pretty simple and straightforward, and since the surface you are sanding is not exposed, you don't need to polish it up when you've got it filed flush.

The OP should check the rest of his neck pocket the next time she or he takes the neck off, to make sure there isn't another chip waiting to happen somewhere else around the edge of the pocket.

When I build a guitar, I take care of this as soon as the finish is sufficiently cured. Fender can't address a lot of little issues like this at the price they sell those guitars.
 

MKB

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
8,369
If that finish is the Fender nitro similar to some of the earlier Hwy1 guitars, it would definitely be best to seal it as soon as possible. I found that finish to be unbelievably fragile, and it would chip out huge chunks at the slightest provocation. The guitar looked nicely reliced after about 6 months of gigging though. When I got bored on a gig I would pop out a chunk of finish with my thumbnail. Kind of a "if you pick it, it will never heal" thing.

BTW, that is a very nice looking fret rounding and polish. Very well done.
 

the_Chris

It's All Been Done Before
Silver Supporting Member
Messages
3,580
I had an MIA P-Bass that also chipped away, it happened by the strap locks. I can understand the frustration if your keen on aesthetics. It never really bothered me enough to worry about it.
 

onemoretime

Member
Messages
2,862
Little late in the game, but they sell pickguards (Fender '62 11 hole) with a notch so you can adjust the neck without taking it off.
 

VJF

Member
Messages
1,556
Not trying to derail but are those stainless frets?
They are the stock frets on a '62 Hot Rod which are described on the Fender spec sheet simply as "Medium Jumbo"

A lot of times that happens because the original finish "rolled over" the edge of the pocket when it was shot, creating a bulging surface and a very tight fit right at the top edge of the pocket. This fat slug of finish will sometimes snap off when the neck is removed or put back in.

I like to file or sand this surface flat on guitars where the problem exists. It is pretty simple and straightforward, and since the surface you are sanding is not exposed, you don't need to polish it up when you've got it filed flush.

The OP should check the rest of his neck pocket the next time she or he takes the neck off, to make sure there isn't another chip waiting to happen somewhere else around the edge of the pocket.

When I build a guitar, I take care of this as soon as the finish is sufficiently cured. Fender can't address a lot of little issues like this at the price they sell those guitars.
Thanks for this tip...next time I pull the neck (very carefully!!!) I will sand all of the sides.

If that finish is the Fender nitro similar to some of the earlier Hwy1 guitars, it would definitely be best to seal it as soon as possible. I found that finish to be unbelievably fragile, and it would chip out huge chunks at the slightest provocation. The guitar looked nicely reliced after about 6 months of gigging though. When I got bored on a gig I would pop out a chunk of finish with my thumbnail. Kind of a "if you pick it, it will never heal" thing.

BTW, that is a very nice looking fret rounding and polish. Very well done.
Thanks...the frets came that way from Fender

Little late in the game, but they sell pickguards (Fender '62 11 hole) with a notch so you can adjust the neck without taking it off.
Awesome...wish I had known...thanks! I'll look into this as it's not too late to put it on now so that I don't have to risk this happening in the future - not to mention how much easier adjusting relief would be!
 




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