Npd: Mxr La Machine

Roadstar II

Member
Messages
253
This is belated, as I received the pedal yesterday. However, I wanted to take a bit of time to see what this pedal can do--and if the new pedal shine wore off after the first hour of playing. Fortunately, that was not the case, as this pedal is awesome.

In case you don't know, this pedal is based on the Foxx Tone Machine and is basically a 70's-style fuzz pedal (not a Fuzz Face. Think Big Muff voicing with a touch of octave effect). I bought it because while I like my Big Muff, it was deficient in the way of note clarity and definition for single-note lines. Here are three things that stand out about this La Machine:

• It has gain for days. Past 9 o'clock and it's full-on saturation. I run it at 7:30 for a mid-gain tone that cleans up based on pick attack. It can do doom metal and 70's classic rock equally as well.

• It has a lot of natural low-end. None of the pedal demos I viewed showed off its girth. The bass response responds well to palm-muting and creates a boomy rhythm tone similar to a Big Muff. But, like a Big Muff, I can see some amps thinning out its sound.

• The note clarity is wonderful. Legato techniques are practically useless with my NYC Big Muff on lower-gain settings. This pedal picks up all the finger work and deliver great sustain and dynamics. I can use the neck pickup on my Strat and it will pick up hammer-ons and pull-offs. My Big Muff does not.

I can see how this pedal could sound shrill to some. I keep the tone know below 12:00 to help with that. It has a wide tone sweep with the tone knob. Also, the octave mode is good but kind of a one-trick pony (White Stripes-type whammy effect).

Overall, I really like this pedal. It's exactly what I wanted: a Big Muff with more note clarity. It has that same naturally-scooped voicing, so I'm not sure how it will mix with a band yet. But I'm definitely a fan of the sounds it provides so far.
 

Roadstar II

Member
Messages
253
Sounds cool what are you using for an amp and guitar?
Well that's where my opinion may be a bit flawed. I played through both single-coil and humbuckers (sounds great with both). However, my typical amp is a Vox Night Train, which historically hates distortion pedals. The amp I'm currently using is an old Marshall practice amp that loves pedals. So, I have to qualify that my assessment is based on a forgiving amp. I'll be trying the pedal on my Vox this week.

The most I can guarantee is that it has great clarity and dynamics. If you have an amp that takes pedals well, I imagine the La Machine will sound wonderful. I'm hopeful the low-end suck my Vox inflicts will not vex this pedal as much based on its intrinsically copious low-end.

Either way, my joy from this pedal exists in finding the closest source of that "ideal tone" I've sought: a warm fuzz that has practical dynamics and clarity. Will other pedals do that as well? I'm sure. But it's really satisfying to acquire that tone with this pedal, so I have to endorse it despite any potential pitfalls. Even if it sounds like garbage on my gigging amp, it's nice to have something in the toolbox I can plug in and nail that dream tone. Wasn't expecting that from this purchase, so it's a splendid surprise.
 
Last edited:






Trending Topics

Top