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Official Thead: RIP EVH Eddie Van Halen

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Well, here's to resurrecting and highlighting all of your life mistakes and imperfections when you go as well...cheers!
i just reported this guy's replies in this memorial and was told by administration that they were rejected because they are factual
i will now get banned or a time out for this post
good to see TGP admins have such a big heart and are so concerned with the factual evidence of EVH's health issues and how he lived his private life
 
A note to those thinking about reporting posts in this thread who don’t agree that the mentioning of EVH’s well documented health problems and /or history of drug/alcohol abuse not being germane to this discussion;

Please only report posts that violate TGP Rules. His life...especially what occurred in public, and that he openly spoke of including the good, bad and everything in between is OK for any member to discuss as long as it’s posted respectfully.

Thank you.
 
Watching EVH live on Kimmel, fairly recent. With Wolf on bass and DLR. Eddie kicks off Panama, and lo and behold, that touch, His rhythm playing, he sounds like a piece of heavy machinery. Tight, precise, heavy. What a sound
That's the show where DLR clocked himself in the nose with the mic, right?
 
I posted yesterday, but like many have said this one hurts and I just want to add a little more.

I am not a musician unlike many (maybe most) here, I play for a challenge, to unwind and just because. I love it. I love guitars and gear, but mostly I have always been a life long music fan. Friends always were surprised by my various collections of music over the years, from cassettes as a teenager, to CDs, to nearly a 100gb of music on a separate hard drive, before streaming.

Eddie and VH were in my wheelhouse from the time I was 10-11 in 1980. The first album (cassette) I bought with my own hard earned money from chores around the house was Foreigner 4, followed by Moving Pictures, the Who's It's Hard and Fair Warning. I was a hard rock kid, from 70's rock (Zeppelin, Petty), to punk (The Clash, X), to southern rock (ZZ top) to hard blues (SRV) to prog (Rush) to countless metal genres (Queensryche, Maiden, Leppard, Anthrax, etc.) to grunge (Nirvana, AIC, PJ, SG) to more scattered flavors as the 90's and 2000's unfolded Sleater Kinney, White Stripes, QOTSA, etc. But I was also proud that I always searched out other music forms and was open minded to talent. In the pop/rock worlds, I saw and/or loved the work of Prince, Depeche Mode, Midnight Oil, Michael Jackson, Everything but the Girl, Portishead, the Cranberries, the Beatles, Stones, CCR, Jeff Buckley, etc. Thanks to people here and on the mylespaul.com forums, I have had my eyes opened to Peter Green, Rory Gallagher, the three Kings, etc. And thanks to some great friends, I have also developed a love of jazz. I enjoy artists from bebop to bossa nova to swing and so on. I am a particular fan of Thelonious Munk and Sonny Rollins (I love Sonny!).

That said, from just a fan perspective (I know there is a good chance the musically talented here may completely disagree from a technical perspective) but I have felt for a while that Eddie was rock's Charlie Parker. I have seen a lot of Hendrix comparisons here and for guitar that makes sense, as Eddie took the "torch" as the guy at the top of the heap, who dropped the jaws of his contemporaries.

But from a fan perspective I just see a lots of similarities between Eddie and Bird. They were both immense talents, who were loved by fans and fellow musicians alike. They saw and heard things differently than most others. They changed how others approached their instruments and forged a new path forward for good or bad, inspiring others, and changing the musically landscape. They challenged the expectations of what was expected of them. They lived for their instruments and music, and probably shortened their lives because of those obsessive personality traits. But in the end, they changed their part of the world.

As the son of Jan Van Halen, maybe Eddie would have enjoyed that comparison.

Miles Davis said, "You can tell the history of jazz in four words: Louis Armstrong. Charlie Parker".

Maybe this is reductive, but at least for our time in history:

"You can tell the history of hard rock guitar in five words: Jimi Hendrix. Eddie Van Halen."
 
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I posted pics I took of Eddie earlier in this thread...took them in college during my days as a professional photographer.

I’ve been looking at these pics a lot today.

Lots of memories came rushing back...especially from the night I met Eddie and handed him an envelope full of 8x10s I took of him from that May night in 1991 in Detroit.


Standing between the guard rail and the stage, in the Pit...20,000 screaming fans around me....one camera on each shoulder....2 pockets full of 36 exposure rolls of film...........AND THEN THE LIGHTS GO DOWN!!!!


The fact that he actually sent one back to me, signed to me, really make me think about his character....he could have easily tossed them in the trash.

One of the best guitar players in the history of Rock n Roll actually took the time to look at my photographs. And I have a feeling, if there weren’t so many people and time constraints at the meet n greet, he probably would have looked at them with me then and there.

I’m a very emotional person. I didn’t sit around and cry like a teenage girl today, but looking back to that night in Detroit, looking back to college, looking back to first time I heard “Running with the Devil “.....it all culminates to fire up those emotions of days gone by.
 
Last night while tossing and turning in bed, I was thinking a lot about EVH while reminiscing of my lost youth where VH was centrally important. It occurred to me that there is such a thing as "Pre-Van Halen" and "Post-Van Halen" electric guitar in the history of rock. I firmly believe this is not an overstatement.
 
It occurred to me that there is such a thing as "Pre-Van Halen" and "Post-Van Halen" electric guitar in the history of rock.
I would change that to read "Pre-Van Halen" and "Post-Van Halen" in the history of music....

...considering how far-reaching his influence has been. Came across posts from Keith Urban, Brad Paisley, Chesney, actors, talk-show hosts, and just about everyone from all walks of life that ever enjoyed music from any genre. Eddie's stamp is all over it.
 
I posted pics I took of Eddie earlier in this thread...took them in college during my days as a professional photographer.

I’ve been looking at these pics a lot today.

Lots of memories came rushing back...especially from the night I met Eddie and handed him an envelope full of 8x10s I took of him from that May night in 1991 in Detroit.


Standing between the guard rail and the stage, in the Pit...20,000 screaming fans around me....one camera on each shoulder....2 pockets full of 36 exposure rolls of film...........AND THEN THE LIGHTS GO DOWN!!!!


The fact that he actually sent one back to me, signed to me, really make me think about his character....he could have easily tossed them in the trash.

One of the best guitar players in the history of Rock n Roll actually took the time to look at my photographs. And I have a feeling, if there weren’t so many people and time constraints at the meet n greet, he probably would have looked at them with me then and there.

I’m a very emotional person. I didn’t sit around and cry like a teenage girl today, but looking back to that night in Detroit, looking back to college, looking back to first time I heard “Running with the Devil “.....it all culminates to fire up those emotions of days gone by.
Very Nice !!
 
I was lucky enough to see Eddie on Van Halen's 1st tour when they came in to town.

They opened for Black Sabbath on November 22, 1978.

I was TOTALLY blown away by his playing that night.

Up until that time, I'd NEVER EVER seen anyone run and jump around on stage the whole set while playing mind boggling licks on a guitar.

When he did Eruption, I thought it was some type of guitar magic.

I was at the right place at the right time that night, as I was able to get one of his picks that he threw into the audience during the show.


He and Randy Rhoads were my 2 main influences when I started playing in rock bands in the early 80's.

Getting to see Eddie and Randy perform up close was a huge inspiration to me as a guitar player.

I was also lucky to have Randy hand me the only guitar he gave out the night I saw him with Ozzy back in 1982

Randy's pick is the Fender Med Tort pick in the plastic bag to the right of Eddie's pick.

Here's a pic of Eddie that night on stage on Nov. 22, '78.

There's a possibility,though very small, that the pick he's using in this pic, is the very one I have in my possession. I guess I'll never know, but it's possible.

RIP Eddie!!!!


 
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Anyone here remember seeing VH for the first time, and thinking "uhhh... the guitarist is wearing kneepads. WTF are we in for?"

I forget when and where, or why....it was so long ago. But I remember talking to my teenage friend at the time about it, who was also learning their first bar chords. :)
 
Many think it was Eddies lead playing that made him great, and I agree he is amazing, but to me it is his rhythm playing that sets him apart. He always serves the groove and lays down the feel for the song. He is my rhythm guitar hero. :)
He had such a sense of melody even in his craziest licks and his lead playing was obviously off the charts, but he was the one for me who made rhythm guitar playing seem cool. I remember hearing VH1 for the first time, and those riffs were like bombs going off. They were so explosive and they grooved so hard. No one sounds like Eddie.
 
I would venture to say that most of the music stores and guitar related manufacturers in the late 70's forward to the late 80's owe their financial success primarily to Eddie. EVERYBODY wanted to be him and millions of guitars, amps, pedals, etc etc etc were sold because of him. Visiting a Guitar Center on any given day in the 80's was a cacophony of EVH hammer-ons and shred, which we will likely never see/hear again! :)
 
One of the local stations was playing a non stop Van Halen fest string of music today. They would break in between every 2 or 3 songs to say: "Celebrating Eddie Van Halen" ...and then play another block. I don't know why but I got all weepy thinking about it. :cry: I had to de-weep before entering work.

He moved a lot of people and changed the direction of their lives by his music. I had two of my friends call me last night (because they knew how much I was into Van Halen) and we talked a bit about how he affected our musical direction.

It's cool that many radio stations are going over the top to honor him. :aok
 
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