Ok...if you can point me the post, I know this question has been beat to death...

Dirtystranger

Member
Messages
465
Does a solid guitar really produce more sustain because of its mass?

How pronounced are tonal differences between solid v chambered bodies?

Reason I'm asking is my next purchase will be some variant of a '54 styled LP w/ a wraptail and P90's. I recently bought a sweet (and chambered) Manalishi and it's really becoming a go to guitar because of the tonal variety and weight. But, I have noticed the sustain is not quite as prominent as a CS 58 (easily 9-9.5 lbs) I had which featured the burstbuckers and replica bumblebees.

Thoughts?
 

Jahn

Listens to Johnny Marr, plays like John Denver
Silver Supporting Member
Messages
29,240
For electrics, I find the amount and type of coupling between the strings and the body to matter more than the amount of wood there is in the body.

I've had guitars that sounded like banjos because the anchor points really didn't allow for much transference of vibration. As a result the strings kinda died out real quick and the sustain was deadened. When that happens the pickups don't have much left to pick up. Bye bye sustain.

That's for the electrified sustain. A different story for acoustic guitars. There, it absolutely matters because the body is your projection machine. If it's a solid block of wood there just won't be any kind of ringing out. If it's a thin top and a big hollow body with thin bracing, that guitar will explode forever, and depending on the type of wood, will be quick and percussive like maple, or complex and sustain like mahogany and even more, rosewood.
 

Dirtystranger

Member
Messages
465
So. if your logic is correct - if LP style guitars would have the same sustain (all specs equal), and the remaining variables would be pickups.
 




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