Ok, I'm back to pianos sounds... what is the best, most realistic ?

Bucksears

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
8,361
Funny, I just today went with with the Lifetime License for Roland Cloud's SRX Piano I and II VSTs.
Great for the price ($69/ea), so it's something (at least) better than the stock pianos in my Roland XV-3080.
 

nsureit

Old Guy...but not too old
Silver Supporting Member
Messages
4,707
Pick up a used NORD Stage2 SW73. They are loaded with great acoustic and electric pianos. Plus, you can download some killer concert grands. Just note that the great concert grand pianos are large files, and the Stage2 is limited to 500MB. Also, the B3, VOX and Farfisa organs are excellent.
 

soundchaser59

Thank You Great Spirit!
Silver Supporting Member
Messages
12,515
If software is on the table, Pianoteq is quite good. Not only does it sound great, but they’ve done an amazing job with emulating the responsiveness of the software to feel like a piano, even with a MIDI controller.

For hardware, I’d echo the comments of others that Nord and Dexibel are among the best I’ve heard.
Excellent plugin. I was using Pianoteq with a KX88 and it was a superb combination. But my KX just died after 35 years so now I'm snooping.
 

John Quinn

Member
Messages
1,148
I like the Nord piano tones and Kurzweil has some good ones. Who else has good realistic patches in like a 73 key semi or weighted keys?
The two best Piano Sounds (IMO of course) are found in Kontakt 6 and Logic EXS24 when loaded with either the Garritan Abbey Road CFX Concert Grand sample set or Spectrasonics Keyscape Collector Keyboards (the LA Custom C7 Grand Piano). And I would recommend the Synthogy Ivory II Grand Pianos (based on a Bösendorfer 290 Imperial Grand, Steinway D Concert Grand, and Yamaha C7 Grand) but it has some 'challenges' for me. The issue I have with it is the size of a the fully loaded sample set - 77 gb!, the USB iLok requirement and even though it's gorgeous sounding it's modeling technology versus a true sample set.
 

jzero

Member
Messages
602
I used to own a Casio CGP700. It was a weighted 88 key digital piano. It sounded and played GREAT! I'd buy one again if I wanted hardware.

Why did I sell? I'm a **** pianist. I record midi instead of audio so I can fix the bad notes. While this is effective for improving the performance, the sound of the cheap VST piano libraries I was using just wasn't quite as good as the Casio. I could get serviceable tones out of AIR Mini Grand, Waves Grand Rhapsody, or Soundmagic Neo Piano 1... They just weren't quite as spectacular as the Casio.
Then one day I accidentally broke the USB port on the piano. I solved my issues by selling the piano to someone who didn't care about USB. Then I bought Pianoteq Stage 6 and a used Launchkey 61 midi controller. BOOM! Killer sound in about a 100MB instead of 14GB! Pianoteq is a modeller not a sampled piano so it doesn't have the giant sample library. I'm VERY pleased with the sounds and portability of my new rig. Anyone considering VST piano libraries should check out Pianoteq.
 

63blazer

Member
Messages
99
Yamaha has a great piano.

My dream rig would be a $6,000 dollar Yamaha Genos or Montage for digital piano sounds and a giant $15,000 dollar Buchla for analog.

While I dont have that money I could see an $800 Yamaha MX as a piano sound and $1300 Moog DFAM and Morher-32 as an ambient analog dream machine replicating the concept of a Zen-like Buchla.

Realize also that from upper mid level like an $800 Yamaha MX and up can give you vintage enough sounding analog sounds, too as well as great piano tones from the once industry leading Yamaha MOTIF sound engibe. I have a great digital sound engine in my affordable Casio AiX which has eight times the processing power as the longtime Casio AHL engine, and I get some great Prophet 5 sounds coming out of that Casio’s new AiX engine.

You almost can’t lose for nice digital piano sounds once you’re spending over $300 dollars. $500 dollars gets really good but as you pay more, you fall into the law of diminishing returns.

A weighted key may not sound better than a high end synth action keyboard but may add to the piano experience that some players like more.

Even the shape and look of the instrument can have an effect but it’s nice to hear premium piano sounds side by side.

 
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63blazer

Member
Messages
99
Bosendorfer, owned by Yamaha, is pretty nicely digitized into their high end Montage keyboards. The montage 8 here is $4000 dollars.

This model has superknob which gives your acoustic piano different room and distance effects.

 
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