Ok, I've had it with analog or "analog voiced" delays...

ASATClassic

Member
Messages
365
I've been trying to love analog delays for a long time. I know many of us prefer them over digital. My experience is that in a band setting, they mostly just add mud. Occasionally if the song if very spacious, they can sound pretty good. Usually, it just feels like I'm mucking up my sound.

I've tried Maxon AD80, TRex Replica, DLS Echo Tap (I know, the last two are digital, but they they are "analog voiced").

Am I alone on this? :confused:
 

malabarmusic

Member
Messages
1,701
The AD80 is *very* murky sounding. I favor "clear" sounding analog delays, of which I consider the Way Huge Aqua Puss a benchmark. Of course, I let the AP go after the Echoczar arrived. :cool: The 'czar has a vintage/modern switch that lets you choose between the pristine and swampy ends of the spectrum.

On a tighter budget, I find the EH Deluxe Memory Man to be quality analog delay.

I've yet to hear a digital delay with rolled-off highs that I prefer over good analog. The loss of top end is just one part of the sonic equation. In general, I have a hard time getting on board with using digital simulation to replicate an analog phenomen -- especially when great sounding analog examples are readily available.

- DB
 

jops

Member
Messages
58
The reason I bought my Akai Headrush was because it had the high end roll off knob. It mostly stays on the 'clearer' side of things though.

Jon
 

Priestunes

Member
Messages
1,102
Yeah... that's why Tim at Retro-sonic is just about to put out a delay: aiming for great analog tone.
 

Mark Robinson

Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
8,742
Analog delay when working right, into the input of a gained up rig can give you gurgles, amazing undertones and ghosts, which are inspiring. The digital on the other hand gives more precise control, repeatability etc. but I prefer digital, post distortion or in a loop if possible.

As usual you have to mix and match depending on what you want to hear, and what the particular gain structure of your rig is. and how crap of a sentence you can write.:D
 
T

tthompso7

Maybe you're using the wrong delay... I wouldn't trade my Maxon AD900 for anything. Sounds awesome through my setup.

I'm no fan of the AD80.
 

PlexiBreath

Member
Messages
1,206
I find the mud comes from running any delay or echo into the same amp as your dry tone. I never use a delay digital or otherwise if I don't have a second dedicated amp for it, and when I do I just use my old echoplex. Since I don't like lugging a second amp around I rarely use echo.
Kelley
 

shallbe

Deputy Plankspanker
Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
11,944
I much prefer analog. Some are clearer than others---I love my AD999. I also dig old Boss, MXR, Ibanez and Morely delays.

I can't stand the digital modelers like the Line 6 stuff. Sounds bad even when its off and unreliable when its on, IME.
 

Swarty

Member
Messages
1,131
There are a lot of flavors. I use an AD-9 (much cleaner than an AD-80) as my primary big room sound delay. I'll put in the DM-2 if I want a more murkey/darker/swampy vibe and when I want a precision tap-tempo'd triplet or an over the top DDL effect I'll add the DD-20.
 

rawkguitarist

Member
Messages
11,118
Yep, I know it's politically incorrect to say you prefer digital, but I do. With every thing else, to me it's about what works live. My AD-900 doesn't work for me live at all! I need tap tempo, and the only way to do it (well theres the memory lane, but not out yet) is to go digital. I can't stand an out of time delay.

I choose the Line 6 Echopark. Or DL4 (if it's good enough for Bill Frisell, it's good enough for me).
 

LSchefman

Member
Messages
13,432
Some people prefer oysters, some prefer snails, isn't that true, Antoninus?

I like snails AND oysters...
 

Balok

Member
Messages
3,572
To me, analog sounds like digital with the highs rolled off. IMO, nothing beats a tap delay. I run 2 delays about 50ms apart, such as 500 ms and 550 ms. You get a very rich full, natural delay that gives you a fatter overall tone.
I started messing with modulated delays, verb on the delay, and tap delays after hearing Whitney Houstons soundman running delays on her voice where the delay itself had a huge ambient tone.
 

Blix

Wannabe Shredder
Silver Supporting Member
Messages
26,585
I prefer my delays bright with some chime, like a EP-3, so regular digital delays works better for me than analog.
 

punX

Member
Messages
52
Well, it's certainly a question of personal preference. But saying they mostly just add mud in a band sound to be sounds weird. Some absolute classic recordings have analog delay/echos on them and countless of stunning live shows have been performed through them. They certainly have not caused concerns here.

I believe it's down to needs. To me it simply sounds your tone/playing/sound might not require what analog delays bring to the equation. I guess it's why many have both, an analog or analog-voiced echo unit and a digital one. There are many delays that offer both. Just go with one of them and use the delay tone needed.

I've been swearing by my vintage EH DMMs. It's very rare that I feel the need for a digital delay. But i also know it's down to the type of music I'm playing.



I've been trying to love analog delays for a long time. I know many of us prefer them over digital. My experience is that in a band setting, they mostly just add mud. Occasionally if the song if very spacious, they can sound pretty good. Usually, it just feels like I'm mucking up my sound.

I've tried Maxon AD80, TRex Replica, DLS Echo Tap (I know, the last two are digital, but they they are "analog voiced").

Am I alone on this? :confused:
 

StompBoxBlues

Member
Messages
19,962
That's my experience too...

I still have a few analog, never use them. I like the flexibility and the sound of digital. I know lots of others prefer analog, I'm just not one of them. And I'm okay with that.
 




Top