OK - so I'm a drummer now...how do I work this thing?

Aceman893

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2,027
So I saw this on CL, for $125 and I got it. Now, how does it work? Not "turn it on" I got that...

But as a 40+ year guitar player,
5+ year bass player,
2+ year hackey keyboard player....

What do you suggest I do to teach myself basic drumming?
 

fuzz_factor

Silver Supporting Member
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4,362
Lessons! At least for a couple of months.

When I was in 8th grade, I wanted to play drums. My band teacher wanted me to play sax. We made a deal that if I took drum lessons, I could move to drums but I'd start out on the sax (in hindsight, I love sax music and should've stayed with it).

Money being tight, my first "job" was cleaning the house every week to pay for those drum lessons with a drummer from the symphony. Sticks and a practice pad. This is the book I used:

Drum Method: For Band and Orchestra

There are probably better, more modern books, but getting your snare technique down will benefit you immeasurably.

I took lessons for a maybe a year (half a year?) - never on drum set - and played in school band through high school. All my drumset learning came from just jumping on kits when I could.

Those drum lessons helped in many way: Learning how to hold the sticks, learning rudiments, drum rolls and - importantly - how to sight read rhythms. I think taking a few months of drum lessons were more valuable to my guitar playing than any guitar lesson I've ever taken.

These days, I'd love to buy a drum set and probably will someday. My girlfriend is on board, but I don't think she knows how loud it will be! But, she might want to learn, however, or just f**k with out super annoying, rude, always loud and obnoxious neighbors.

Whenever I play with other musicians, there are always too many guitarists and no drummers, so I jump on the drum kit. I'm not great, but I can keep time if I don't get too fancy with fills.

Good luck!
 

Plaid Sabbath

Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
1,300
Once you get everything set up, look for some stuff with really easy beats. Oldies...like 50s and 60s stuff are really good for simplicity. Lots of doo wop tracks had some basic boom-chicka-boom beats. Focus on your snare, kick drum and hi hat to start.

British Invasion groups...Beatles, Stones, Kinks, etc. Lots of cool, simple grooves.

Load up on some disco tunes too. You might not dig the guitar parts, but the drum grooves are solid four on the floor stompers. A lot more fun doing Bee Gees tunes on drums. Trust me. I'm a card carrying metalhead for over 35 years.

Once you start getting some playing time under your belt, you'll start paying more attention to drums in everything you listen to.

My wife actually started playing my e-kit about 3 months ago. Complete novice. She's keeping up with lots of 70s-90s pop songs. Nothing crazy, but she can keep a steady beat and improved quite a bit. Previous musical experience was piano and bass. Making very steady progress.

Have fun. Be patient.
 

Aceman893

Member
Messages
2,027
Lessons! At least for a couple of months.

These days, I'd love to buy a drum set and probably will someday. My girlfriend is on board, but I don't think she knows how loud it will be! But, she might want to learn, however, or just f**k with out super annoying, rude, always loud and obnoxious neighbors.

You know...I got ELECTRONIC DRUMS. Amazing modern thing. Like pads, with headphones. 20 kits in a box! Small, lightweight and quiet. Unless I plug it into a little mixer and my 18" EV subs and 15" mains....
 

redchapterjubilee

Silver Supporting Member
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1,447
I teach students to recognize what limb makes what sound. Then identify the sounds on music you listen to. Then spend as much time as you can while listening getting in the habit of moving your feet when you hear a bass drum, moving your left/right hand for the snare, and left/right hand for the cymbals. Then take that to the kit. I use AC/DC as the example I show students. Then go from there. There are tons of Youtube tutorials as well.
 

wraub

Member
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2,016
As a bass player who wanted to play drums, I started with some pieces from a thrift store. They didn't really match, but. drums. :)
I played on these for quite a while, realizing I actually had some potential, and got a better set and better cymbals.

I suggest you start where you are, and play as much as you can. Start with basic beats and rudiments, stick control, etc.

On YT, I strongly suggest Rob Brown. No BS, straight talk, and he's a really good player too. Lots of videos from him and others that can help you.
 

Daytona57

Member
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3,158
I started out, playing with a jam band, having decades of Martial Art training, I was able to use all parts of my body independently, simultaneously at the onset

I took lessons for a few years, and could incorporate, the material into jamming right away. I still have a Taye Tour Pro semi Pro Jazz kit then upgraded to a Taye Studio Maple kit.

I started out with whatever cymbals, I could pick up used. Then bought used Zildjian K Customs set and Paiste 2002 and Giant Beats cymbals sets.

The best way to learn is lessons and playing with people and practice your weaknesses.
 

Marrsumm

Member
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84
If there's a local teacher whose playing you like, I would highly recommend taking some in person lessons for the first few months so you don't immediately start off with too many bad habits.

Also, Drumeo is honestly pretty fantastic. I'm working through Todd Sucherman's course and it's great.

 

In Absentia

Member
Messages
7,780
If there's a local teacher whose playing you like, I would highly recommend taking some in person lessons for the first few months so you don't immediately start off with too many bad habits.

Also, Drumeo is honestly pretty fantastic. I'm working through Todd Sucherman's course and it's great.


Hey, I’m working through the same course right now! I’m doing the method and some of the stuff with Gavin Harrison, too. But I’ve really enjoyed the Sucherman class.
 

Marrsumm

Member
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84
Hey, I’m working through the same course right now! I’m doing the method and some of the stuff with Gavin Harrison, too. But I’ve really enjoyed the Sucherman class.

Yeah, Sucherman is a phenomenal instructor. He really has an excellent ability to distill things down to the essentials. I'm getting so much mileage out of the Gary Chaffee/Rosetta Stone exercises.
 

tfblaster

Silver Supporting Member
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skydog

Silver Supporting Member
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My son is a professional drummer. Watching him play stuff involving 4-way independence just baffles me!
 

ZeyerGTR

Member
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4,158
On YT, I strongly suggest Rob Brown. No BS, straight talk, and he's a really good player too. Lots of videos from him and others that can help you.
Rob Brown is awesome. As another long-time guitarist that just started playing drums a few years ago, he's had a lot of good exercises that I've gotten a lot out of.
 

Daniel C

Member
Messages
1,032
+1 for Haskell Harr. And Carmine Appice's Realistic Rock drumming is still very good. I'd also recommend live, in-person lessons. Good drumming starts with good technique.
 

ToobNoob

Member
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556
I'm self taught, well I had 1 lesson years ago...

Get the drum book "Stick control" & practice it. Thats what lots of folks say.


:beer
T$
 

Wahlberg

Member
Messages
333
So I saw this on CL, for $125 and I got it. Now, how does it work? Not "turn it on" I got that...

But as a 40+ year guitar player,
5+ year bass player,
2+ year hackey keyboard player....

What do you suggest I do to teach myself basic drumming?
Where are you at after 2 months?
 

Aceman893

Member
Messages
2,027
Not much further. Had some gigs to play! LOL.

I can play standard beats:
bass-snare-bass-snare w/ Hats
Bass-snare-bass bass-snare w/ hats

I can do a basic tom roll bum bum bum bum - bum bum bum bum - bum bum bum bum -Crash
 




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