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Old guys, what was BOSTON when they came on the scene?

gtrdave

Supporting Member
Messages
5,102
I was 1 and already well into rock and pop and R&B, thanks to all of my older sibling's record and 8-track collections. When the first Boston album was released it was like nothing I'd ever heard before.
 

motokev

Member
Messages
4,266
".....but how were they received from Joe Blow six pack in the 70s? "

The 70s, what a special time for music.
There were so many great bands and music (unlike now).

Being in High School in the late 70s, KISS was the popular band amongst the kiddies.
I never cared for KISS. Pink Floyd was my favorite.

I remember Boston being played all the time on the radio.
I was never a fan.
I agree, too over produced.
 

Figaro

Supporting Member
Messages
12,432
I thought they were ok at first. They had a very different sound. I didn’t buy their music until later because I heard it on the radio so much. They were considered pop-rock and I was more into the lesser known, underground bands at the time. But I came to appreciate them more after the second album came out because of the quality of it’s production and it’s sound. I saw them live in 79 along with Poco and Atlanta Rhythm Section. Great show. In my opinion Brad Delp was one of the greatest voices ever and it’s mainly because of him that I like Boston.
 
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Alan Dunn

Member
Messages
1,222
I think they were a lot bigger in the USA than Australia. Here I can remember the two singles but I think I was the only one of my group of friends who purchased the debut album.
Frampton Comes Alive on the other hand everyone had a copy of at the time.
 

Guitardave

Member
Messages
9,817
I was a in 7th grade in Massachusetts when Boston hit the radio and I immediately went out and bought the album. Part of it was my age but that first album just blew me away.

For me albums were a luxury that I worked part time jobs to afford. In today's dollars it would be $40-$50 and rarely would be there be more than a few great tunes on it. That's why the .45s were still so popular. So albums like Boston and Hotel California where just astounding....every track was really strong and several were big radio hits that you heard everywhere!!
 

Stormin

Tele's and Plexis
Staff member
Gold Supporting Member
Messages
4,123
IMHO, you have to remember what else was HUGE at that time: Aerosmith, Kiss, etc. Then the Boston album comes out: it’s an Analog tape album recorded in a guys rented house (for the most part). IT WAS UNBELIEVABLE. Even forgetting the songs and the playing, that album set new standards for EVERYTHING in recorded music.

It has aged incredibly well for something recorded in 1976. It still sounds amazing by today’s standards and not dated. And yes, the songs, the playing and the guitar tones are fantastic too. IIRC, 7 out of the 8 tracks were radio hits.

When you think about everything else that had been released in popular music up to that point, you’ll understand just how huge it was/is.
 

Stormin

Tele's and Plexis
Staff member
Gold Supporting Member
Messages
4,123
More than a feeling was everywhere and huge. No one knew when it was released that it wasnt an actual band.
I disagree. They were very much of a band - in the beginning. Watch some of the live footage from the late 70’s.
 
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Kurt L

Member
Messages
4,763
Boston, Kansas, Foreigner, Heart, Styx, Toto, REO Speedwagon, Journey, and Survivor fit that mold. Guitar, bass, drums, keyboards, and wailing tenor vocalist. The genre came to be known as 'corporate rock'. The music was more polished than that of the first half of the 1970s.
Kansas doesn’t belong in that category, nor does Journey prior to Steve Perry.

Boston certainly has a smooth sound relative to a lot of other bands, but those first two albums were really good. Scholz knew what he was doing... and then we all went out and bought Rockmans! :p
 

Arcadia

Supporting Member
Messages
1,824
That first album is quite good. I liked it a lot back in the day. The second album was a disappoint, and the third was just bad.
 

DreamTheaterRules

Former Lyricist for Calhoun Tubbs
Silver Supporting Member
Messages
4,433
Kansas doesn’t belong in that category, nor does Journey prior to Steve Perry.
Exactly right. Anyone who knows ANYTHING about Kansas, knows they aren’t corporate rock. They were progressive rock, and DAMN GREAT at it! In fact, so prog that most of their songs weren’t big radio hits. Then Carry On hit and they got big. Then Dust in the Wind hit and was played on rock, pop, even country stations, and suddenly they were superstar big. But, corporate rock, not a chance.
 

Dr. Tweedbucket

Deluxe model available !!!11
Messages
47,816
Boston, disco, Bad Co, Foreigner and others around that time, I knew old school rock was over. :cry: I didn't really care for them because I was still soaking up Deep Purple, Beatles and Zeppelin for the most part. I didn't mind a few songs off their debut album, I mean they were catchy and good but when their second album came out, it sounded too much like the first and I think that's where I lost any interest :huh
 
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sandcastle

Member
Messages
1,247
They were big. I had the first album. A bit 'glossy' for me, but you can't knock More Than A Feeling. Loved the guitar work on it.

I'll take Triumph over Boston any time. But I'm Canadian (eh).
I saw Triumph more times than I saw Boston, living in Indiana they often crossed the border. I saw them as 'Rush-lite'. Not in a bad way.
 

sandcastle

Member
Messages
1,247
Exactly right. Anyone who knows ANYTHING about Kansas, knows they aren’t corporate rock. They were progressive rock, and DAMN GREAT at it! In fact, so prog that most of their songs weren’t big radio hits. Then Carry On hit and they got big. Then Dust in the Wind hit and was played on rock, pop, even country stations, and suddenly they were superstar big. But, corporate rock, not a chance.
Agreed. And Leftoverture is amazing. There's a good documentary out on Kansas, not sure the name of it.
 




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