Old guys, what was BOSTON when they came on the scene?

Howlin Maxx

Member
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79
I was in junior high in 75-76, high school 77-81... they were huge in my circle of friends. We all owned the 8 track lol.

"Man I'll Never Be" is still one of my fav alltime songs and Bradley Delp one of my fav rock singers.
 

BluesForDan

Silver Supporting Member
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8,988
you had to be there. There are not words in the languages of man that can adequately describe their success. Inescapable as a black hole's event horizon. It certainly seemed that way from our locale, given our proximity to the city of Boston.
 

Telebluze

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1,800
I liked a couple of their songs, but they weren’t really my cuppa.....yo me they were more pop-rock than hard rock, I put them in the same category/camp as Journey and REO Speedwagon.

The crowd I was hanging-out with were listening to Deep Purple, Black Sabbath, Ted Nugent, AC/DC, Pat Travers, Judas Priest, LZ, Thin Lizzy, UFO, Scorpions
 

donnievaz

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3,576
It was different, almost revolutionary. I was a kid into Aerosmith, Nugent, Skynyrd, Zeppelin, and Hendrix at the time and it was like nothing else I'd heard. I wasn't a super fan but I dug that 1st album and yes they were huge. Then Van Halen dropped in '78 and that was all she wrote. There were 3 rock albums that were complete "Wow this is really different and cool" moments for me. Boston, Van Halen, and Appetite for Destruction.
 

BluesForDan

Silver Supporting Member
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8,988
Up to that point, disco was flooding the charts and the airwaves. That first album was like a breath of fresh air. It was the right sound at the right time.

I bought the first "Rockman" headphone amp I saw. What does that tell you?

I bought one too. I think I may have found it when I was packing the family home for sale. Can't remember if I kept it or threw it away. *I think it had battery damage so it is likely it's gone* I threw away a lot of portable electronic gear for that reason.
 

ranchofm

Member
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777
Ah, the era when every band had its own spaceship.

That sound set the standard for bands in the area where I grew up and started gigging in the mid 80's (NE Pennsylvania). If your singer didn't sound like Brad Delp or Steve Perry and your band couldn't make a corner bar sound like an arena, you weren't getting any gigs. And that standard lasted well into the 90's. My band was playing INXS, the Alarm, the Cure. We weren't getting any gigs.
 

Boston617

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3,165
They fizzled when they didn't tour much or follow up the first album.

They may have fizzled during their downtime, but the 1987 "Third Stage" tour was their most successful. 74 dates & nearly 3/4 of the tour were multiple nights in the same city.

I'm also fairly certain it was the longest break between consecutive #1 studio albums on the Billboard 200 (8 years, 1 month, 21 days between Don't Look Back & Third Stage)

Philadelphia - The Spectrum - 3 nights
East Rutherford - Brendan Byrne Arena - 4 nights
Detroit - Joe Louis Arena - 3 nights
Inglewood - The Forum - 3 nights
Oakland - Oakland Coliseum - 4 nights
Tacoma - Tacoma Dome - 2 nights
East Troy - Alpine Valley Music Theater - 4 nights
Worcester - Centrum - TEN nights
Landover - Capital Center - 2 nights
Pittsburgh - Civic Arena - 2 nights
Richfield - Richfield Coliseum - 2 nights
Tampa - Sun Dome - 2 nights
Pembroke Pines - Sportatorium - 2 nights
Saint Louis - Saint Louis Arena - 2 nights
Denver - McNichols Sports Arena - 2 nights
Hartford - Hartford Civic Center - 2 nights
 

Sidmore

no talent hack
Gold Supporting Member
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3,271
I was in elementary school when their debut album dropped; it was MASSIVE then and still gets significant airplay on the classic rock stations in this area. Brad was a hometown boy; we graduated from the same high school (albeit about 20 years apart) and he still lived locally so it wasn't uncommon to occasionally see him out and about doing very un-rockstar things like grocery shopping and pumping his own gasoline.
 

Tone_Terrific

Silver Supporting Member
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37,144
Even the idea of dual guitar harmonies that weren't the Allman Bros. was thought to be technology and therefore fake.
? The dual lead guitar format was well established right through barband level players by then.
I saw them live during the height of their popularity and was disappointed with the sound. Maybe they had the wrong sound company doing the show. Maybe just a bad night for them. Maybe they were never going to recapture the studio sound in a live performance.
I saw them open for Trower on their first (likely) tour.
Poor sound in a half arena venue FAR before lights, screens and reliable stadium sound were developed. They were disappointing, as I recall, sounding and performing like a decent cover band.
The album remains great, of course.
 

MikeMcK

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
6,788
They were a mile wide and an inch deep - lotta calories, no nutrition... When they first arrived, it was new and different and, as a beginning player, Tom Sholz' "rockman" technology seemed kind of interesting. But like so many of those late '70's, early '80s bands (Foreigner, Kansas, Supertramp, Styx, Loverboy, Little River Band, etc, etc,etc, etc etc,) they were basically just power-pop bands. I guess they had a pretty big audience for a while, but none of them really had much staying power. I personally liked Head East, liked Boston for the first album, and pretty much didn't like any of the rest of that genre. I got really tired of Boston really fast too. I think I saw them (I saw EVERYONE in those days) but I can't even remember for sure, which tells you something...

-Ray
Kansas isn't a power pop band, and I will never understand how they get lumped in under the "corporate rock" thing. Power pop can be covered cold by any half decent band.

Pick any of the first four Kansas albums to cover, start to finish. If your band can get it down well enough to play in less than two months, you've got a good band whose members probably learned a few things about music while learning those songs.
 

JCW308

Silver Supporting Member
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10,195
Boston was HUGE in the mid 80's when I was in high school. Boston shirts, Boston cassette tapes, book covers, Boston albums, stickers in your locker, guitar effects, etc.... as guitarists we lived and breathed Boston and wanted that "Scholz distorted nasal guitar sound" that nobody likes today :) The Rockman half rack units and "Walkman-like unit" were all we wanted PLUS I think they had delay built in so we were set!

Bdx_01.jpg
 

Britishampfan

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3,034
Before my time but Boston was great, lasted well into the late 80`s on local classic rock radio. I guess we were puzzled as to why they didn't put out more music, something about a lawsuit, and then of course their final effort which had a good song or two but it just seemed like they waited too long and missed their time period. It was just good feel good rock, nothing heavy or mysterious and what's wrong with that? Still better than most new bands out there. Its classic rock.
 
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I bought one too. I think I may have found it when I was packing the family home for sale. Can't remember if I kept it or threw it away. *I think it had battery damage so it is likely it's gone* I threw away a lot of portable electronic gear for that reason.
I gave mine away to my nephew when he started playing guitar many years ago.
 

Teal_66

Member
Messages
3,319
I was a little kid when the first Boston album dropped. I distinctly remember that I was spinning Rush's 2112 and Led Zeppelin's Presence almost endlessly in my room, but when I bought the new Boston album I spun it into oblivion. I literally played it so much that the groves wore out. I recall that after making some bucks from my lawn cutting "clients" in the neighborhood, once I would rustle up enough money to get an album, my friends and I would all go to the local record store and spend a good amount of time choosing what to buy. It was a BIG deal. I very much remember when we all walked in there and saw the Boston album pasted all over the store. With a cover that cool, it was the obvious choice.
 

mosesblues

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
597
As others have said, this album hit like a ton of bricks. No filler at all and a unique sound. One thing that has stood out to me with Boston is that I've seldom or never heard a band cover them really well. The need for vocals, harmonies, lead guitar harmonies, and that big sound - all played with precision - is challenging.
 




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