On a Les Paul bridge, which side should the intonation screws be?

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by steved0x, Sep 15, 2008.

  1. steved0x

    steved0x Member

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    Should they face the bridge pickup, or should they face the tailpeice?

    I seem to see it each way, wondering what the "correct" way? Or if it is a period thing (ex: vintage goes this way, but modern goes that way)

    Thanks!

    Steve
     
  2. soli528

    soli528 Silver Supporting Member

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    I believe they should face the bridge pup. It seems like it would be a lot easier to adjust them that way.
     
  3. FrankieSixxxgun

    FrankieSixxxgun Member

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    Depends on the type of bridge as LPs can come with different types. Nashville bridges face the stop, the other one faces the pickup.
     
  4. Guinness Lad

    Guinness Lad Silver Supporting Member

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    They can go either way, it depends if you have enough room to intonate the guitar properly. If you run out of room you can flip them and this gives you a few more turns. Usually the problem is you can't make the string length long enough.
     
  5. mc5nrg

    mc5nrg Supporting Member

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    Usually the skinnier ABR original tunamatic sits with the screws facing the pickup, the heftier later Nashville tunamatic screws face the tailpiece. In general you want the flat face of the saddles as the leading edge for the strings( facing the pickup) unless you have to turn saddles around for intonation adjustment.
     
  6. HRydarcik

    HRydarcik Member

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    There's no correct way...it's a matter of personal preference.
     
  7. walterw

    walterw Gold Supporting Member

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    yep.

    nope.

    yep.

    nope.
     
  8. The Golden Boy

    The Golden Boy Member

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    Why not?

    Is there an actual reason other than "that's just the way it goes?"

    It's like asking why the adjustable poles on the LP pickups are towards the bridge on the bridge pickup and the nut side on the neck pickup. According to Seth Lover- "it just looked better."
     
  9. swimrunner

    swimrunner Member

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    IMO, working the screwdriver around is much more of a pain on a Nashville bridge.
     
  10. walterw

    walterw Gold Supporting Member

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    not really, :) other than the abr-1 screws tend to hit the strings if put on backward.

    if you wanted to take the time to tear apart a nashville bridge, turn all the saddles around so the flat side faces the vibrating string like it's supposed to, rearrange all the saddles so each string still sits on the saddle that was notched out for it, and then re-adjust everything, you could and it would work fine, but why? it comes with the screws facing the stop bar.

    IIRC, seth didn't even design in pole screws at all, the marketing boys wanted them.
     
  11. guitarfish

    guitarfish Member

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    My '07 Standard came with the screws facing the bridge. Coming from a Fender background, that seemed logical to me. On my Std, there seems to be no advantage in which way they face. I just left it as it was. FWIW, I only check the intonation about once a year anyway.
     
  12. Guinness Lad

    Guinness Lad Silver Supporting Member

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    If you can't intonate the guitar because the saddle will not go back far enough there is nothing else you can do other then flip the saddle.

    Perhaps you misunderstood my statement, the screw head will face the same direction but what you will do is remove the saddle, unscrew the saddle from the screw, flip the saddle and re-assemble the components. The screw direction will remain the same only the saddle will be flipped.
     
  13. The Golden Boy

    The Golden Boy Member

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    Depending on the angle at which the strings head towards the stop bar...

    I've replaced saddles on bridges with 3 different types of 'saddle retainment' the little staple clips, the little 'c' washers and the ABR-1 retaining wire. I've had to flip saddles for intonation purposes. For the purpose of having the saddles facing the same way or opposite ways or 3 forward/3 back... I don't know of any reason why it needs to be either way- providing the string isn't making contact with the screw heads, the back of the bridge or any other part of the saddle besides where the string breaks.

    Now that you mention it, I believe you're correct as well!
     
  14. walterw

    walterw Gold Supporting Member

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    no misunderstanding, and no argument here, either.

    also no argument. (ok, almost no argument. it's not a big deal, but i think it's better to have the flats of the saddles towards the neck where possible.)

    however, if the question is, "i was changing strings on my gibson and my bridge fell off, which way does it go back on?", the answer is: ABR-1? screws to the pickups; nashville? screws to the stop bar.
     

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