One dead note

lubdub

Member
Messages
45
So I'm beginning to think I am becoming ridiculously picky as I age but I recently bought a brand new Taylor 814ce after a relatively short stint with a Gibson SJ200. I love the Taylor for its warm tone and versatility for my playing style but I found that although the tone stay balanced even capoing up there is one note, the low G when on capo 7 (technically D) dies out disturbingly rapidly and doesn't really happen anywhere else along the neck. Anyone ever run in to anything like that? Maybe a little less with a Paige or Shubb capos than the the others I tried but still noticeable.
 

LeicaBossNJ

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
2,629
There is a big thread on Strat Talk right now on this very thing.

Unfortunately, it is not uncommon for a guitar to have dead spots where all the energy gets sucked out of a note. There are ways to suss out if it is a fret thing or something more serious, but you may be stuck with a dead note.
 

lamenlovinit

Member
Messages
3,843
I had a guitar that had a dead note on the 5th string 11th fret. How often do you use that? Unfortunately it was prominently featured in a Leo Kottke song I used to play a lot... It literally went "Thunk" when you hit it. I thought it was my hearing. But when I acquired a second guitar it was undeniable. Dead spot.
 

lubdub

Member
Messages
45
Good to hear I'm not crazy. Thanks for the Strat Talk direct. Not sure I want to mess with it a ton since it is brand new but was thinking of having a luthier maybe take a peek. Don't really want to mess up the other 72+ notes necessarily for that. Think its worth contacting Taylor?
 

danl13

Member
Messages
11
I had a bass guitar I used as a backup years ago that had one bad note.. It was way up on the high end and almost never needed
to be used.. Yet, just KNOWING it was there made me, perhaps even subconsciously, end up there... I don't think it'll
ever leave your mindscape...
 

LeicaBossNJ

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
2,629
Taylor really can't do anything to help, unfortunately. If it is really really bad, maybe an exchange.
 

lubdub

Member
Messages
45
So interestingly it does still die out even without the capo but I will admit it is subtle and limited to just that note. However, thinking that maybe I was a little crazy I did go play another 814ce at a Guitar Center and heard the same thing. When I talked to the luthier about it he first gave me the "look" but then heard it as well. You are right that it does kind of sit in my head a little but I had him set up the bridge a little and tried some D'addario EXP 26's and that helped a bit and since it really really serves my purposes well I can deal with it. When I played for others they didn't know what I was talking about. :rolleyes:
 
Messages
6,600
Ouch. An 814 is what, a 3K guitar? No way should it have a dead note. I'd get in touch with the dealer and Taylor, see what they have to say
 

Irving Pye

Member
Messages
578
[QUOTE="lubdub, post: 23167413, member: 181875". Anyone ever run in to anything like that? .[/QUOTE]

Kinda.......F# on the high E string was doing the same thing. Found that the 3rd fret was slightly elevated at that side of the neck ....15 minute fix and back to playing!;)
 

gentlyweeping

Member
Messages
1,209
On my Epiphone Masterbilt the F# note was noticeably weaker on all strings everywhere on the neck for the first 6 months or so but it's gradually strengthening with consistent playing.
On my very recently acquired Taylor 210ce I have the same thing going on except that its the F note.
I'm going to assume this will improve with age like the Epiphone did.
Now on the (too many) Strats I've owned the A note is and always was the weak one but only concerning sustain.
 

jazzguitar14

Member
Messages
1,927
This may or may not help... but its worth a try.

Somehow, possibly a looped recording or keyboard drone, I use a Peterson tuner pitch generator, play this note in an infinite loop through your biggest baddest speaker at a reasonably loud volume. Then lay the guitar in front or on the speaker and go-to to work for the day, effectively vibrating the guitar to the D frequency. Eventually, in theory, the guitar will "open-up" to this range.

There are other similar tricks, but they require more specialized tools.

I have done this successfully in the past with both guitars and violins. Other times it was complete waste of time. YMMV.

Best of all, you neighbors get to hear a loud drone for a few days while your out...
 
M

Member 37136

In the electric world, there are a few notorious dead spots: on fretless bass guitars, the G-string 5th fret area is often short on sustain, and on semi-hollow ES-335 style guitars, the sustain of the 12th-fret on the G-string is often limited. One common fix is to attach a "Fat Finger" to the headstock, which changes the mass of the neck and can correct such dead zones. The only caveat is that sometimes it just relocates it to another spot on the neck.

fender-fat-finger-guitar-chrome-sustain-headstock-tools-rochford-uk-p7607-7188_medium.jpg
 

Paleolith54

Member
Messages
3,445
You are totally correct. The dealer wasn't particularly helpful. I think I will contact Taylor
I think you should, and I wouldn't assume "that's just the way it is", though that could turn out to be the case. I had a dead spot in my Tom Anderson Crowdster; talked to Tom about it, sent it in, he found that it was caused by a fret repair/replacement that someone had done a poor job on. In the course of discussing possibilities, though, he remarked that his favorite acoustic guitar (an Olson) has a definite dead spot in it, and that there was just nothing to be done about it. My (fallible) memory is that he also said that mahogany necks are a bit more prone to the problem. So if it does turn out to be an inherent feature of the instrument, you're actually in pretty good company.

Good luck!
 

lubdub

Member
Messages
45
Thanks all. I have been playing it to death and, like a sore tooth although still noticeable to me seems like it is less and less. It is funny how the "global tone" of a new guitar takes a little getting used to when you're picky about tones and we so habituated to a previous sounds.
 

royd

Member
Messages
2,042
This may or may not help... but its worth a try.

Somehow, possibly a looped recording or keyboard drone, I use a Peterson tuner pitch generator, play this note in an infinite loop through your biggest baddest speaker at a reasonably loud volume. Then lay the guitar in front or on the speaker and go-to to work for the day, effectively vibrating the guitar to the D frequency. Eventually, in theory, the guitar will "open-up" to this range.

Yes it is the nature of the beast that a guitar will have some frequencies and spots that are more dead than others. @jazzguitar14 is pointing to my first thought. The guitar is new. You could use his method or... Play it... and play it... and play it... and it will loosen up and open up, especially to the styles and keys you play most often.

Second, try a variety of different strings on it. You may find that one string lessens this more than others.
 

DRS

Member
Messages
13,659
Capo on the 7th fret? Acoustic guitars are not designed to be perfect capoed up this high. I guess if you're trying to make your $3000 guitar sound like a $300 mandolin . . .
 
M

Member 37136

Capo on the 7th fret? Acoustic guitars are not designed to be perfect capoed up this high. I guess if you're trying to make your $3000 guitar sound like a $300 mandolin . . .

Please elaborate: to what fret are acoustic guitars "designed" to allow a capo? "Hotel California" was recorded with a capo on the 7th fret, and "Here Comes the Sun" used one on the 8th. They both sound pretty good to me.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

lubdub

Member
Messages
45
Thanks OM Flyer I agree that there are quite a few capo 7 songs that are good and I know that the volume certainly is less when capo'ed up high but what I was referring to was the note sustain and balance which should maintain relatively evenly throughout the neck and which clearly dropped off just for that note.
 




Trending Topics

Top Bottom