Opinion on OD type amp circuit

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs' started by toneman335, Apr 15, 2008.

  1. toneman335

    toneman335 Member

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    From those in the know would most agree that the HRM circuit would be the way to go in a "D" style OD amp? As I understand the HRM has the smoothest OD tone.
    I know tone is subjective but I would like to hear your opinions.
     
  2. toneman335

    toneman335 Member

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  3. Ayan

    Ayan Member

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  4. kimock

    kimock Member

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    I think the smooth thing probably has more to do with playing style and the rest of the rig than any specific circuit.
    My personal opinion re: smooth, which could mean different things to different people, is that on the actual Dumbles that I own or have played, the smoothest overdrive tone was on the non-HRM 50 watt amps in the "jazz" setting with the bass shift engaged and not a whole lot of gain.

    You still got to play the guitar to get the amp to do anything, and I think that point gets lost in a lot of these discussions. My opinion about the non-HRM style amps' smoothness is relative to my playing style, specifically the strength of the right hand attack.

    I'm most comfortable, in the zone, whatever, when I can really lean on the guitar. I want to be able to beat the tone out of the guitar, or squeeze it out or generally push through the amp to get it going. That's a relatively old-school approach, and it would work fine for flogging any non-overdrive Fender style amp. I want the amp to be just under that threshold where it's gonna distort and I want to supply the voltage that puts it over the top with my right hand attack.

    A lot of contemporary players, "lead guitar guys", mostly play with a much lighter right hand touch and lighter strings than I do normally.
    They're not going to get the same dynamic swing, regardless of the output of the guitar, at the input of the amp with that technique and setup that I get with mine, and as a result the circuits and settings that are "smooth and singing" to me could very well sound and feel unresponsive to them.

    I get the same unresponsive feel (although a much different sound) out of the higher gain versions of the D- thing because the amp is basically already clipping enough that my efforts to push it around are unrewarded; there's nowhere left to go. . .Up anyway.

    Now, imho when I check out the RF thing on a technique level, I see a guy doing everything he can with his hands to control an already distorting amp, lots of muting, coil taps, gtr. volume and/or tone rolled off as well. . .see where I'm going with this?

    I think the individual player's style is the tie-breaker on the HRM/non HRM D type amps that are the subject of interest around here.
    There's going to be some overlap between them, and they all sound way better when you crank them up, but I think the reason for the existence of those two basic voicings in the first place was to address the difference in playing styles that were either pushing the amp over the top, or trying to control it once it was solidly clipping.

    OK? You're getting to the same basic place (smoove) from just below clipping in one case, or just above clipping in the other.
    My preference for the non-HRM Dumble over the HRM, and I've owned both for many years is more or less dictated by playing style, which I'm kind of stuck with at this point, moreso than any "tone" preference. They all sound great, I'm just more in the zone when I'm pushing the amp than when I'm trying to hold it back, but to each his own.

    So that's my opinion.

    If you want some advice, here goes nothing. . .

    Just buy the damn thing whatever it is and DON'T SELL IT!!!!!
    The learning curve on that platform is steep, long, requires adjustment and progress with your technique, and it takes forever to really break in an amp, and that's half the battle.

    All new amps sound funny to me. . .;)
    ymmv

    peace sk
     
  5. Guitarzan

    Guitarzan Member

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    Really great information. Thanks for taking the time. I tend to side with you. I've played all sorts of Dumbles real and clone alike and the tones I pull out are much different than most guys mostly because I do attack the guitar more and use really big strings. I usually end up using the jazz setting as well. I tend to prefer non HRM because I'm mostly a single coil fender guy, however I have really enjoyed HRM with my 335.
     
  6. kimock

    kimock Member

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  7. jspax7

    jspax7 Member

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    I agree with Steve here, as I've always thought that the Jazz voicing is where these amp's show their dynamics.

    With a light touch you can't tell the amp is in overdrive, dig in, and it just sings. I dig the Rock voicing too, but when I want to make it talk, it's the Jazz switch for me.

    Playing an amp this dynamic can only help my technique. That's why the Dumble inspired amps are my favorite at this time. BTW, the non HRM works just fine for my needs. Smooth or aggressive, it's in there. You've just got to play the amp.
     
  8. Tom Gross

    Tom Gross Supporting Member

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    This is exactly what I dig about this type of amp (and other styles of good dynamic amp). Of the Dumbles and related amps that I've played achieving this type of effect has been independent of the presence of an HRM-type config.
     
  9. abergdahl

    abergdahl Member

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    I tend to prefer the Rock setting having the amp just OVER threshold so that it is clean when i pick light and sings when i play normal, what i lose is that it just compresses and roars when i really dig in, well lose is not the right word. I do like to set the clean sound on the amp so that it reacts in the way Steve explains.
    Here is a non HRM minimalistic D style Cougar amp CLIP. The speaker is Altec 417-8C that together with a non HRM circuit gives a OD sound more like Lindley than RF, bright and dynamic. (Guitar is Soloway T27 (tele-ish) with DiMarzio area T pickup)
     

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