Opinions and cost of refret...

tommygunn1986

Member
Messages
2,854
This is my first guitar. Had it since I was 16. My family didn't have much money and couldnt afford to buy me a guitar. A friend of mine gave me this guitar when he got a new one. It was in terrible shape when I got it. Dented frets with razor sharp ends, poor tuning machines, unusable vibrato system, etc. but I played the hell out of it anyways. It also had some really lame band stickers on there which I tried to sand off. The coolest thing is that its a 3/4 scale body with a full 25.5" scale length. I'd never get rid of it but it is completely unplayable.

Lately I've been thinking about making it playable. It would need a refret, new bridge saddles, new tuning machines, and new pots and jack (as they are very scratchy). I've also thought about putting an HB sized P90 in it.

How much does a refret cost and what do you think of this idea in general?

1226162304_zps57byndyr_edit_1482812411753_zpsxpr5uizc.jpg


1226162304a_zps9tmu8hlg_edit_1482812484552_zpsfcbswwra.jpg


1226162304b_zps9zn5zmpb_edit_1482812595923_zpskecdf5wd.jpg
 

blong

Member
Messages
2,688
It has sentimental value, and no $ amount can replace that. I say go for it. You may just need a fret level and some setup. Get a GFS Dream 90 pickup, some good CTS pots, adn have it rewired and made to play.

A fret level should cost between $75 and $150. It can vary depending upon how much nut work is needed. A refret could cost between $200 and $400, depending upon how much work is needed to prep the fretboard. Also, different luthiers/shops charge different amounts. Look at 3rd Coast Guitar Repair, Fingerlakes Guitar Repair, or the Guitar Repair Bluebook to get a ball-park figure on the cost of all the repairs. Then take it to a reputable luthier (not just the guitar tech at any store, b/c some are good and some are learning on your giutar), and get a price on it. I believe in playing guitars until they are worn out, so get it done, and play the hell out of it. For between $200 and $500 you could make your first guitar a killer player. I would also buy some tuners from GFS, which should be about $40 for locking, staggered tuners. A great, great price for those. Get the pickup, tuners, and pots, and then take it to a luthier and have him/her do the fretwork and wiring, and install the tuners, and you can have a killer guitar.

Again, the sentimental value is incalculable, and if it has a good feeling neck, then get her done and play her. Many others might say hang it on the wall and spend your money on something better, but it could be a killer guitar with the right setup and decent electronics and tuners.

Bob
 

blong

Member
Messages
2,688
Here are the parts I would use:

Something from this page:

http://www.guitarfetish.com/Humbucker-Sized_c_578.html

If you want EVH tone, go for the VEH. If you want p90, get Dream 90, but look around this page and pick what you want. The pickups are great sounding and great pricing. This stuff is good, despite the price.

For the trem, get this, but check the spacing. Yours might be import spacing, not USA spacing, but get the brass block. It fattens up the tone yet has a nice zing to the top end:

http://www.guitarfetish.com/USA-Spaced-Solid-Brass-Block-Tremolo-Complete-Kit_p_1239.html


Then these:

http://www.guitarfetish.com/Now-STA...-Tuners-Sperzel-Style-String-Lock-_p_514.html

I would buy two CTS pots and take it all to a luthier, or do as much as you can yourself so save some money. The parts could be about $150. Put the tuners on yourself, put the trem on (watch a vidoe on how to do it, and make sure you get the right spacing), and if you can solder, copy the circuit that is in there. Then pay a luthier to do the frets, a nut, and setup, and it will be a killer guitar. I have used GFS parts for many of my personal builds and their stuff is just fine. I would even get a bone nut put on. If you're gonna be a bear, be a grizzly. Get it put together the way you want and it could be your number one. It will be killer, trust me, and you won't regret it if you intend to keep it. I have a Squier strat I did this to and people are blown away. It plays and sounds killer, and everyone thinks it's a boutique build. Actually, it kinda is, from my boutique.

Enjoy.

Bob
 

blong

Member
Messages
2,688
By the way, others may poppoo the idea, but I would do it. You will enjoy it, and extra payoff comes when people plug it in and play it and you see their jaw drop. My uncle had an old, ugly, rust El Camino, but he was a mechanic and put a 550hp engine in it and drag raced. He won a lot of money, and people laughed when he bought that rust bucket. Their eyes popped and their mouths dropped when he blew most people away in their corvettes and mustangs. You can do the same with this, for not too much. If you lived in Texas, I would hook you up and do a killer job. I love doing these things.

Enjoy.

Bob
 

teleman1

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
16,204
If Blong is doing this kind offering, check on shipping to Corpus Christi. Might be worth it.
 

luv

Member
Messages
3,152
Doesn't seem worth it to me. But as blong eluded to, sentimental value can go a long way.
 

Ncp10

Member
Messages
1,443
Fret level is a good idea if there's enough meat left. With all those changes, be prepared for it to be a somewhat different instrument that will take getting used to. But like they say, when you need new tires...
 

cardinal

Member
Messages
5,657
$300 plus or minus for a nice refret and fret level. Obviously the guitar isn't worth that much, but if you've got the money and want to do it, why not. I could easily think of less virtuous ways to rid yourself of $300.
 

swiveltung

Member
Messages
14,483
A decent refret is expensive now days. I'm not sure why, "what the traffic will bear" I think. I refretted a friends fender style neck this year. 2 hours womb to tomb. I have the gear, but it's not setup and ready like a luthier should be. So he ought to be able to do that easily. If you figure $80-100 an hour, a refret on a non bound neck ought to be <$200. Unfortunately I don't think that is the case.
Of course there are other factors, a fretboard in poor shape etc that make the task take longer.... so it depends.
 

blong

Member
Messages
2,688
Those Duncans are nice p90 style, and I also meant the Mean 90, not the Dream 90. It's a little snarlier when pushed, and covers more ground. I like the Duncans, but I would try to keep the cost down, unless $$ is not an issue.

I passed on fixing up one of my old junky guitars (a Samick SG, bolt-on, given to me by a friend). I put the money into something about what I could have spent fixiing this guitar. B/c it was a gift, but not worth much, I just couldn't justify the $ to fix it up. The gift guitar was still sitting there, staring at me. I had some nice pickups lying around, and some good tuners, so I fixed it up. I don't regret it. It plays and sounds great. I took it to two local shops and A/B'd it with other SG's of various makes. It hangs with any of them. If you don't scratch that itch, it will probably always be there. Get it done, don't spend way too much, and I bet you play it a lot more than you ever have.

You won't regret it, especially if you plan on keeping it.

Bob
 

bob-i

Member
Messages
8,762
I've refurbished 3-4 guitars like that over the years. Typically the frets are not well seated and dressed so pressing them back in and supergluing them will go a long way. Once that's done you can dress them out, crown and polish. Tuners, bridge and electronics are nothing, GFS makes great stuff at good prices.

I really wish I'd saved my first guitar, kudos to you for giving it a good home.
 

Tone_Terrific

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
38,116
If you can get by with a fret dressing do that.

There are options such as GFS for cheap replacement necks, or you buy a discarded Squier or similar, with a good neck, and salvage the neck.

Or you pay more.:)
 




Trending Topics

Top Bottom