Order of Meguiar's application

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by Rich G., Apr 30, 2015.

  1. Rich G.

    Rich G. Member

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    I have a guitar that had a lot of scratches on the back that I wanted to clean up. I went through the process of wet sanding using increasing grade numbers of MicroMesh. The finish is all smooth now, but looks cloudy. I picked up a few Meguiar's products to finish the job: #1 Medium Cut Cleaner, #7 Show Car Glaze, and #9 Swirl remover 2.0. I'm wondering in what order should these products be applied?... and should I use anything else after that?
     
  2. wetordry

    wetordry Member

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    Swirl remover will likely do it all if you are using a buffer/foam pad. Works around here anyway on almost everything from pickguards to paint but 3m is what I usually have.

    But medium cut is like rubbing compound and the regular order would be rubbing compound, swirl remover, then glaze which is basically wax.

    Personal opinion is the medium cut might be excessive.
     
  3. Rich G.

    Rich G. Member

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    The #1 Medium Cut Cleaner and the #7 Show Car Glaze feel very similar to me. They look the same both having a tan color and have the same runny consistency. The #9 swirl remover is more like Elmer's white glue. Since #1 and #7 feel so similar I'm thinking the order should be #1, #7, then #9.

    Is the #7 I got the right stuff? It doesn't feel waxy at all to me.
     
  4. dc_jcm800

    dc_jcm800 Member

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    Traditionally, for a car any way, it would go scratch removal>swirl removal(compound)>polish>wax.
    Meguiars has some goods tips on their website. #1 might be too aggressive and #7 is definitely for final application. I have never used their pro products.
    I would think after micro meshing to a smooth cloudy finish, compound and or polish and then wax would do it.
     
  5. wetordry

    wetordry Member

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    There are exceptions and the rules aren't always hard and fast, because the products are used for different scenarios....but speaking in terms of paint in general, like auto paint, which the products are basically made for...

    Rubbing compound is a step used after wetsanding, or on heavy oxidation, orange peel etc. It cuts.
    It is followed up with a finishing compound or swirl remover or polishing glaze.
    Swirl remover can also just be used to remove those typical type waxing marks that accumulate over time.
    Show car glaze is what you wax the showcar with after all the rest.

    And there are other steps or products depending on need...but for something like a guitar which I would consider a bit more delicate and possibly thinner, I'd bypass the cut of rubbing compound unless the finish is in serious distress. Try the swirl remover for a sec and if that doesn't cut, or you want a deeper fix for scratches, maybe try the medium cut.

    There is a bit of redundancy(overlap) built into these products. Some also are not going to do alot with just elbow grease...they almost require rpms and a pad.
    2000-2500 grit, personal experience on bikes, guitars, rougher pickguards etc...is I use 3m perfect-it foam polishing pad glaze-dark(on a buffer) for just about everything. It's fast and painless and seems to work on a variety of conditions. Maybe followed with wax for protection.

    ooops, I see that dc jcm800 got it.
     
  6. paintguy

    paintguy Long Hair Hippy Freak Silver Supporting Member

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    #1, then #9, then #7 if needed.
     
  7. Rich G.

    Rich G. Member

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    Thanks guys! Per recommendations I went #1, then #9. I probably could have stopped there, but I went ahead and applied #7. The results were stunning! It came out showroom condition. I couldn't be happier.

    Check it out:
    [​IMG]

    If you're interested in the process, here's what I did:
    For the application I used white terry application pads, three grades of cheap buffing pads I got at Harbor Freight and some Microfiber cloths.

    Before anything I numbered each item with a 9, 7, or 1 so as to not mix anything up.

    For the application I started with the white pads. Using a spray bottle filled with plain water I spritzed the pad. Next I applied the Mequiar's product to the pad and smoothed it out over the pad. I then took a sponge with water and lightly 'painted' the back of the guitar with it. I then worked the pad over the entire back surface of the guitar until I had given the whole area. Next I took the rotary application pad, spritzed it with water, applied some product as before, then stuck it to the backing plate already attached to the cordless drill, then buffed the back on the low speed setting. I avoided the high speed setting for a few reasons: a) I didn't want to generate too much heat, b) I didn't want to burn through the finish, and c) I didn't want product flying all over the workshop.

    Once I was done buffing I let it cool for a bit before wiping it down with the Microfiber cloth.
     
  8. wetordry

    wetordry Member

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    Looks really nice!
     
  9. dc_jcm800

    dc_jcm800 Member

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