ordering a Suhr Classic HSS, weight question

ccoker

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
1,783
This should be interesting..
So, as much as I would prefer to play something before buying it..

If you were going to order a Surh Classic HSS and doing say classic rock, liked a big fat tone with lots of sustain and a shop had several in stock in the color you wanted of varying weights, what would you go for?

Let's say they had several between 7.5 to 8.25
 

ccoker

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
1,783
yes, if given my choice I would play a bunch of them and buy the one that plays great and rings acoustically.
I don't even care about plugging in until I have sorted through them..

But, if you can't...

People seem hung up on "lightweight" strats it seems but I tend to think the really light ones lack balls, at least in my experience.
 

bdm

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
3,352
yes, if given my choice I would play a bunch of them and buy the one that plays great and rings acoustically.
I don't even care about plugging in until I have sorted through them..

But, if you can't...

People seem hung up on "lightweight" strats it seems but I tend to think the really light ones lack balls, at least in my experience.
Not exactly the same senario but I recently got a Suhr T. I was on the hunt for a good Tele and had actually bought two guitars in rapid succession. The other guitar was actually really great. Super light weight and acoustically resonant. Almost sounded like it was a hollow-body. All other things being equal I ended up sticking with the Suhr even though it was a bit heavier and not as "acoustic". It just translated better through the amp that way.

I've owned a number of great t-style guitars over the years but time and time again the most lightweight and acoustically lively guitars often translated to a tone that just didn't jive with me once they hit the amp. They often seem to have an agressively bright attack or lack real body to the tone.

Same could be said for the '59 Junior I had. One strum unplugged and I was amazed. But fast forward months later and I just couldn't gel with the attack that that featherweight body gave the notes.

Same story with several otherwise fantastic historic Les Pauls...

For me personally there's a fine line to how light a guitar should be.
 

ccoker

Silver Supporting Member
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1,783
cool.
Personally, I don't get hung up on the weight too much and honestly have never really given it any thought.
I want TONE and vibe
 

stealthtastic

Member
Messages
2,810
Weight has very little correlation with tone in my experience. Generally I find lighter guitars sound better, but it depends on the species and woods being used. IE I don't expect an ash strat to sound better than a maho/maho LP because ash is an inherently lightweight wood.
 

59Bassman

Plank Cranker
Gold Supporting Member
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3,078
I've told this story before so I apologize if you've read it before...

I had 2 Hamer T-51's (incredibly close to what a modern Suhr Classic T is) in the late 90's. Both of them were from the same year (1994, IIRC), and were just a few dozen apart in serial numbers. Both ash/maple, one was a single piece body. Both had identical Duncan pickup sets. I set both of them up with machinist rulers and micrometers to get them as close as possible.

The one-piece body guitar was all wrong. It had no unplugged resonance to speak of - no jangle. It was also heavy, at greater than 9lb. The two-piece guitar was everything folks dream of in a tele. It was under 7lb and rang like a bell unplugged.

Plugged in it was a different story. The lightweight one disappeared onstage. It simply seemed to evaporate when the band kicked in. Everything I'd read told me that the lightweight one was the best one to work with, so I tried OD pedals, I tried EQing my amp differently - none of it worked. One night I brought the heavy guitar to a jam session and was stunned at what happened. That guitar was absolutely alive on stage. It hit like a velvet hammer. It had presence, tone, and weight behind it.

This isn't to say that non-resonant, heavy guitars are all tone machines. What I'm saying is it can be more complicated than how many ounces the guitar is. My Suhr Custom Classic is probably heavier than a lot of guys would consider optimal for a "dream" strat, but it's got the goods. I'm not going to complain a weight difference equivalent to a can of beer when the guitar sounds this good.....
 

JPIndustrie

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
1,358
I had my choice of lighter (6.8 lbs) or average weight (7.2 - 7.4). I went with the heavier guitar because it was the only butterscotch one in stock.
 

ur2funky

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
2,011
To me, a lighter guitar gets picked up and played more, and for longer. I always prefer lighter.
 

martyncrew

Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
2,102
I played a used Suhr HSS Pro yesterday at Guitar Centre in San Jose (PM me if you want details). The weight of the guitar wasn't noted on the tag but I'd guess it was right around 7.5 pounds. Obviously not tested in studio or gig conditions but the bridge tone was big and ballsy through a Fender DR. BTW, the roasted maple neck was very comfortable and felt great to play.
 

Ogre

Member
Messages
4,650
Once again, no connection between weight and tone. There are many factors that contribute to a guitars goodness. It all comes down to the individual guitar.
 

BMX

Member
Messages
3,522
At this point I would just play both and see which one felt better. In my unscientific experience heavier guitars sound better. That said a 12 lb guitar makes for a long gig so there are always multiple things to go by which is why I prefer to play them in person and just go with my gut of what I think of the overall package (how it sounds plugged in, how it feels when I'm sitting and standing with it, how well it plays).
 




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