Over humidified Taylor

Discussion in 'Luthier's Guitar & Bass Technical Discussion' started by chill, Apr 16, 2016.

  1. chill

    chill Member

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    I have a GS Mini that has really high action now. I checked Taylor's website and have figured out that the guitar has been exposed to too much humidity. The top at the bridge and below has swollen, pushing the level of the bridge above the fretboard causing the high action.

    I live in an area with very high humidity but now I know the problem I can take steps to protect it, but is there any way to fix it? Taylor's website offers no suggestions beyond an anecdotal story of drying out a guitar with the damage.

    Please help!
     
  2. Barnzy

    Barnzy Member

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    I'd dry it out in a room with controlled humidity first, then assess for any need to change it's setup once it's at 45 percent. Things I'd also look at are loosened binding and loose internal braces. A dehumidifyer and a good hygrometer are needed. It'll take days, not hours to get the humidity back to normal.
     
  3. chill

    chill Member

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    Thanks, I will try this. Right now, we are at 72% humidity!
     
  4. Barnzy

    Barnzy Member

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    Yikes!
     
  5. billyguitar

    billyguitar Member

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    Detune it while it acclimates. I've had success doing this.
     
  6. great-case.com

    great-case.com a.k.a. "Mitch"

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    ^ Yep... it may be that easy. @Barnzy also offers sage caution, be patient.

    I gotta ask for photos, measurements and a look inside to see if the braces are strained at the gluing points. If the top-popping it is slight, and the bracing is merely bowed with the top, it might return all by itself in a dryer environment. Bob Taylor has shown how overly dried guitars with cracks can be recovered by adding moisture, but I see no reference in his library to the swamp-story.

    New food for thought. I hope it is helpful. Moisture Shock is the most dangerous thing one may do to an acoustic - unless you like smashing them, that it. If you over-dry this baby and do it too quickly, your efforts to recover it may send it over the other edge. I wish I could tell you how to be certain, but here is where I add the best advice I know: Have a Luthier look at it.

    In the long run, assuming the best: Be careful with desiccants near the guitar. Dryer packs assume some air spacing / most carrying cases have negligible air around the instrument. In the sound hole, in a tight case, desiccants are not a great idea. There are better carrying cases on the market (Ameritageā„¢ comes to mind often) with generous air spaces - allowing Hydration Equipment to work at their best. I build wall cabinets to attack such concerns... but to say more would be shameless shill. Goo dluck and let us know how it goes.
     
    Last edited: Apr 22, 2016
  7. John Coloccia

    John Coloccia Cold Supporting Member

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    If it's like that all the time, just have the neck reset and then you can probably forget about it. It's a trivial procedure on most Taylors. Really low humidity is very bad, because once the top/back have shrunk to flat, there's nowhere else to go....and tops cracks, braces come loose, bridges pop off, etc etc. Too much humidity usually just makes the top and back bulge a bit. 70% isn't terrible. It's no worse than Florida. If you were in a rain forest, sitting at 85% or 90%, I would be a little more concerned. We generally like to build guitars around 40% or so humidity because it tends to work well for all but the most extreme climates and results in a playable guitar almost everywhere you might take it.

    But the advice to have someone look at it an excellent idea because there are a number of conditions that can cause this problem.
     

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