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Overdriven Fender Amps

Barquentine

Member
Messages
1,929
Once upon a time it was generally accepted that Fenders were for cleans, Marshalls were for dirt. In the pre-rack days I remember a number of guitarists that would have a Twin for their cleans and an early Boogie for leads.

I've been looked at the thread concerning Fender's Tonemaster Twin and Deluxe Reverb. A lot is made of the attenuation feature which allows you to overdrive the amp at low volume. So you don't have to crank the amp in order to get that flubby, messy, undefined low end response. I've listened to the new Mesa California Tweed that'll do the same thing at a cost of several thousand dollars.

To me, a cranked Fender sounds absolutely terrible. Almost like they have a blown speaker or something has gone horribly wrong with them.

How many of you like your Fenders sounding like this ?
 

Jabby92

Member
Messages
3,524
I find they can sound pretty good if you get a drive pedal in front that adds in some more mids. To me they are relatively scooped, so added mids helps a lot and doesn't cause the bottom end to be so loose. Also, that Mesa amp fixes a lot of issues with old Fender circuits, the bass response is very clear on that amp across the whole range and at just about any volume level. That is not your normal Fender/Tweed circuit, its much more refined and pretty much as good as it gets.
 
Messages
4,878
Cranked Fenders sound terrible?? This guy would beg to differ.... (yes, even before he kicks in the Tube Screamer)

SRV didn’t play those Fenders ‘cranked’. Cesar Diaz reported that Stevie liked his Vibroverb at 6 n the volume. Diaz said that the volume pots would be set before Vaughn played through them. Diaz would do amprelim8nary os)nd setting...finding where the amps worked I. The venue. Diaz would then set the volume KNOB on the pot to reflect a setting of 6....when perhaps it was in reality 5, 5.5, 6.5, 7...whatever worked. SRV was then happy...or so the story goes. I use 5’s on the volume and tones as a starting point for BF/SF Fenders. That works. If the volume needs to be lowered, push the tones up. At higher volumes than 5, the tones need to be adjusted down...especially the bass.
if the amp has a Mi control push that if you want the best overdrive out of the amp.
The Pro Sonic that Fender Bigot mentions is not a BF/SF circuit, and it acts differently than do those BF/SF amps. The Pro Sonic has its roots in the 5F6A Bassman world.
 

Phila67

Member
Messages
1,930
Marshall amps were based on the Fender Bassman, cranked. "Won't Get Fooled Again", is a Gretsch 6120 through a Fender Bassman (I believe). Depends on the type of Fender amp, the tubes etc., the guitar & pickup. Blackface tones will be cleaner with higher headroom.
 
Messages
4,878
Marshall amps were based on the Fender Bassman, cranked. "Won't Get Fooled Again", is a Gretsch 6120 through a Fender Bassman (I believe). Depends on the type of Fender amp, the tubes etc., the guitar & pickup. Blackface tones will be cleaner with higher headroom.
http://www.thewho.net/whotabs/gear/guitar/history.html


The Bassman that was used on some were NOT the 5F6A that Marshall based his first amps on. The source above lists a blonde ‘64 Bassman.....I have not seen pics of that amp that would tell if that Bassman was a 6G amp or a transition AS864 Bf circuit in blonde cosmetics. note the use of a 1x15 BF Po. Years ago when a young fellow was trying out his Les Paul with new pickups through a 1x15 BF Pro I have, he hit some of those power chords. There it was....the sound of those Who songs was there!
 

Simto

Member
Messages
4,407
Once upon a time......it was generally accepted that Fenders were for cleans, Marshalls were for dirt. In the pre-rack days I remember a number of guitarists that would have a Twin for their cleans and an early Boogie for leads.

I've been looked at the thread concerning Fender's Tonemaster Twin and Deluxe Reverb. A lot is made of the attenuation feature which allows you to overdrive the amp at low volume. So you don't have to crank the amp in order to get that flubby, messy, undefined low end response. I've listened to the new Mesa California Tweed that'll do the same thing at a cost of several thousand dollars.

To me, a cranked Fender sounds absolutely terrible. Almost like they have a blown speaker or something has gone horribly wrong with them.

How many of you like your Fenders sounding like this ?
You were 100% looking at the wrong Fender Tone Master

 

d95err

Member
Messages
192
You don’t have to crank the amp all the way up to have use for an attenuator.

For Fender amps, the sweetspot is often that edge of breakup sound. This requires the amp to be turned up to around max clean output power.

Getting there with a Twin is way too loud for most venues or rehershals.
 




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