Overheard in music store: amusing sayings or songs

Tiny Montgomery

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
10,182
Heard two within seconds of each other today at GC.

The first was a discussion about 7-strings between 3 employees. The first guy (at the point I heard their convo) said “They were around before Korn, but they had a high A string then. I have no problem with that.” The three then went on to deride the nu-metal power chord guys for “not learning shapes.”

Right after that, a young girl needed a cable to go with the (solid body) bass she was buying. The guy behind the counter said “you need at least 10 feet or it will feed back.”
 
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618
On the flip side of the Les Paul (guitar not man) commentary - back in 2010 I was in Willcutt Guitars in Lexington KY, killing time at their main store before going over for my "appointment" at the high-end store to check out a couple of Dr. Z amps (didn't buy the Dr. Z; bought a Mesa Boogie Lonestar Special instead) and overheard a father point out a couple of LP Studios and Classics to his son saying "How about one of them?" The kid replied "Nope; I want a LEAD guitar". :facepalm :jo

Perhaps he had been learning from one of these books:

s-l500.jpg


91i1BebUzhL.jpg
 

ripgtr

Member
Messages
12,021
Often, I've been asked, "Do you work here?"
Back in the 90s I got a job working at a music store to supplement the income.
First day, I dress nice. My best cowboy boots (the nicest shoes I had that were not stage shoes), a nice shirt, best jeans. I walk up to a guy, ask if I can help him. He goes "You work here? You look like a customer." Lol. I had to get a tshirt the next day to wear. I never wore tshirts before that.
 
Messages
2,802
Heard two within seconds of each other today at GC.

The first was a discussion about 7-strings between 3 employees. The first guy (at the point I heard their convo) said “They were around before Korn, but they had a high A string then. I have no problem with that.” The three then went on to deride the nu-metal power chord guys for “not learning shapes.”

Right after that, a young girl needed a cable to go with the (solid body) bass she was buying. The guy behind the counter said “you need at least 10 feet or it will feed back.”
Hahha well the 7-string pontificators were slightly right — Lenny Breau’s had a high A string, and so did “Maestro” Alex Gregory’s which I believe was the first production solidbody 7-string

But of course, Vai was using a production low-B seven-string years before Korn, and Bucky Pizzarelli as well I think (and John Pizzarelli’s use of them probably predates Korn as well)

“Not learning shapes” is a hilarious turn of phrase
 
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2,802
There was a guitar shop in Orono? I lived there in the 2000's and no such luck. Even the record store (Dr. Records) is closed now unfortunately.
Oof! That stinks that Dr Records closed, I practically lived in that store. The clerks were cool and always let me buy “Parental Advisory” tapes (such as FNM “Angel Dust”) even tho I was only like 11 or 12

Yeah, Uncle Funky’s used guitars was in the same building, directly above Dr Records (tho it had the whole floor, whereas I think Dr Records was only half of the basement level if memory serves)

It was an amazing shop- they had some really unusual stuff in there — here’s a few things I remember seeing (tho I couldn’t afford them because I was just a little twerp at the time, early 90s)

- Series 1 Alembic for $800
- Brown 80s Flying V for $600 (this formerly belonged to my first guitar teacher, Louis, who worked there. He switched to PRS and around the same time introduced me to Mahavishnu, Weather Report, and all kinds of good fusion stuff )
- They nearly always had Kramer Pacers in there and NOBODY wanted them, they were about $400
- Jackson Fusion with weird face graphic, $500
- and they had literally PILES of silverface Fender amps, mainly Bassmans, that nobody wanted and they could scarcely give them away— the Bassman 50s were $300 and the 100s were $350

The guys who worked there (they seemed like old wizards to me, but in reality were probably 18 or 19) were all into fusion and VERY good players, it was an amazing place to hang out and just learn about music

Were you going to UMO when you lived there? And did you ever hang out at Pat’s Pizza?
 

Jorge E

Member
Messages
4,478
I bought a pedal once and it was not as described . It was not as it was positively reviewed in guitar magazines and after a frustrating day I brought it back . The clerk says ,

I saw you buy that the other day I knew you would bring it back it's terrible


I said ,
thanks for the heads up and traded it for a Boss distortion
 

modal-wool

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
181
Oof! That stinks that Dr Records closed, I practically lived in that store. The clerks were cool and always let me buy “Parental Advisory” tapes (such as FNM “Angel Dust”) even tho I was only like 11 or 12

Yeah, Uncle Funky’s used guitars was in the same building, directly above Dr Records (tho it had the whole floor, whereas I think Dr Records was only half of the basement level if memory serves)

It was an amazing shop- they had some really unusual stuff in there — here’s a few things I remember seeing (tho I couldn’t afford them because I was just a little twerp at the time, early 90s)

- Series 1 Alembic for $800
- Brown 80s Flying V for $600 (this formerly belonged to my first guitar teacher, Louis, who worked there. He switched to PRS and around the same time introduced me to Mahavishnu, Weather Report, and all kinds of good fusion stuff )
- They nearly always had Kramer Pacers in there and NOBODY wanted them, they were about $400
- Jackson Fusion with weird face graphic, $500
- and they had literally PILES of silverface Fender amps, mainly Bassmans, that nobody wanted and they could scarcely give them away— the Bassman 50s were $300 and the 100s were $350

The guys who worked there (they seemed like old wizards to me, but in reality were probably 18 or 19) were all into fusion and VERY good players, it was an amazing place to hang out and just learn about music

Were you going to UMO when you lived there? And did you ever hang out at Pat’s Pizza?
Sounds amazing! I did my shopping at Northern Kingdom in Bangor, which I always thought was generally decent. Of course I knew nothing at the time.

I lived there during middle and high school. Mom is still there, I go back a few times a year. Pat's is always my first stop :)
 
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2,802
Sounds amazing! I did my shopping at Northern Kingdom in Bangor, which I always thought was generally decent. Of course I knew nothing at the time.

I lived there during middle and high school. Mom is still there, I go back a few times a year. Pat's is always my first stop :)
Pat’s rox!

I vaguely remember Northern Kingdom — I think that’s where my dad bought our first amp (a Dean Markley); they had a big rack of new Strats and for some reason had a disproportionately high number of “wine red” strats

Did you attend OMS / OHS? If so, i’d be very interested to know if you knew or have any recollection of any of the following teachers:

Mr Glueck (OMS)
Mr Chilleli (OMS)
Mr Chapman (OMS)
Mr Blair (OHS)
Mr Phippen “Phip” (OHS)
Mr McLean (OHS)
 
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modal-wool

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
181
Pat’s rox!

I vaguely remember Northern Kingdom — I think that’s where my dad bought our first amp (a Dean Markley); they had a big rack of new Strats and for some reason had a disproportionately high number of “wine red” strats

Did you attend OMS / OHS? If so, i’d be very interested to know if you knew or have any recollection of any of the following teachers:

Mr Glueck (OMS)
Mr Chilleli (OMS)
Mr Chapman (OMS)
Mr Blair (OHS)
Mr Phippen “Phip” (OMS)
Mr McLean (OMS)
Yep! I had Glueck, Chapman, and McLean. All are retired now, but all were great folks. Was Mr. Hodgdon the band director when you were there?
 
Messages
2,802
Yep! I had Glueck, Chapman, and McLean. All are retired now, but all were great folks. Was Mr. Hodgdon the band director when you were there?
The name of the band director escapes me for some reason -- maybe because I couldn't hang with the reading in Jazz Band and kind of had to slink out -- when I was there, the director was a nice fella who had a grey mop of hair, moustache, and a pronounced hunchback -- is that the same guy?
 

modal-wool

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
181
The name of the band director escapes me for some reason -- maybe because I couldn't hang with the reading in Jazz Band and kind of had to slink out -- when I was there, the director was a nice fella who had a grey mop of hair, moustache, and a pronounced hunchback -- is that the same guy?
Sounds like him! I know he was there for a long time, so I bet it's the same guy. I couldn't read much either but he let me play guitar in the jazz band anyway...definitely a formative impact.

Always great to meet other Orono folks. I find I run into folks with a connection there way more often than one would expect.
 

Tiny Montgomery

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
10,182
Hahha well the 7-string pontificators were slightly right — Lenny Breau’s had a high A string, and so did “Maestro” Alex Gregory’s which I believe was the first production solidbody 7-string

But of course, Vai was using a production low-B seven-string years before Korn, and Bucky Pizzarelli as well I think (and John Pizzarelli’s use of them probably predates Korn as well)

“Not learning shapes” is a hilarious turn of phrase
Vai was the first to come to my mind. I can all but guarantee the guy wasn’t talking about Lenny Breau. And even if he was, why would he have a “problem” with range being extended downward, but not upward? Strange thing to say even giving him the benefit of the doubt on the history.

The “shapes” thing was slightly paraphrased for the sentence. He mockingly said “why spend all that time learning shapes when you can play songs with one finger?” I suppose I should have just quoted “shapes.” If I’d felt like engaging the guy, I might have said “why spend all that time learning how chords are constructed when you can just learn shapes?”
 
Messages
2,802
Yep! I had Glueck, Chapman, and McLean. All are retired now, but all were great folks. Was Mr. Hodgdon the band director when you were there?

Ran across these BDN clippings when i was going through some old books recently, thought you might get a kick out of em —

Glueck “Downlink” and Chilleli “Uplink” always did a big science project that took several months; in the class before mine, it was a life-size reproduction of the Gemini space capsule; for my class, it was a working Wright Bros glider :
 

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