Own a Collings 000-2HC. What next?

Discussion in 'Acoustic Instruments' started by rodr55, Jul 20, 2006.


  1. rodr55

    rodr55 Member

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    I own a Collings 000-2HC with Rosewood/Spruce. I have been playing a lot of acoustic lately and was looking to get another guitar. Any suggetions on style. I am not really into dreadnoughts. I was thinking a small jumbo like the Collings SJ in Maple. I also thought about an OM but it seems that it would be to close in style to my 000. I really like my Collings, i am just looking for something different maybe slightly louder.

    Any suggestions?
     
  2. opdev

    opdev Member

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    What about an all Mahogany? Those are cool.

    Also, get your next one in a short sale.

    Finally, for loud, how about a wood bodied National like an M2:dude
     
  3. riffmeister

    riffmeister Gold Supporting Member

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    Too bad, the Collings dreads are fantastic!

    I have an OM1A and a D1A and couldn't be happier......those two guitars cover alot of classic tones!!

    .
     
  4. royd

    royd Member

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    check out a Lowden O model... very different sound that is huge
     
  5. rodr55

    rodr55 Member

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    I should try a collings dread. Last time I played a dread (not a collings) it just didn't feel right. I maybe blown away by the sound of a collings dread as I am with my 000 and may have to deal with adjusting to the dread body style.

     
  6. urizen

    urizen Gold Supporting Member

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  7. rodr55

    rodr55 Member

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    Have you played one of them? Does it produce much volume with just F-Holes. It's a real nice guitar but an expensive one.

     
  8. 62Tele

    62Tele Supporting Member

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    I have a Sitka/Indian OM2HC which is really nearly the same thing (just scale lenght difference). For me, a D1A or an Adirondack/Mahogany CJ is in the crosshairs. An adirondack top might be a nice set builder for you - I don't buy that Adirondack is "better" but it is different - faster attack, faster decay, more cut. If you do alot of fast sinlge lines you'll likely appreciate the adirondack.

    BUT...for the acoustic set that makes me really smile, I play my OM and my National Resorocket and it really offers a huge range of timbres. The Nationals these days are VERY well made and despite the stereotypes as a slide guitar (and I'm a slide player) the thing does some really great stuff for fingerstyle and jazz. And it is nearly the same size as an OM and pretty well uts the "loud" thing to rest.
     
  9. urizen

    urizen Gold Supporting Member

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    I am totally with you re: Nat'l-Reso's product and the "ghettoization"* re: their applicability. I've a steel bodied polychrome tricone and a brass-bodied nickel-plate tricone cutaway---I intended to keep one in tuning(s) and one tuned standard, but they are just such great all-rounders (finger-picking and comping) that both have wound up in standard and rarely bottlenecked. They have a particularly PURE string tone, killer sustain, and pick/right-hand position offers a remarkable variety of tone.



    * Rics fall victim to the same phenomenon---my old 330 and my 381 can sound jazzy, pianistic, brash, rich-as-hell, and ALL sorts of stuff besides "jangly" (I wonder how many newbs or regular players have ever actually DELVED into the tone AND volume knobs AND blend knob across all three switch positions...I know Geo. Harrison earned some infamy by saying he didn't know what the blend knob did). The blend knob IS where the magic is!
     
  10. urizen

    urizen Gold Supporting Member

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    F-holed archtops can be louder than you'd think (they were capable of good "chop" in small ensembles), and sweeter (if you're only used to flat-tops, they ARE different tonally, but there's lots of variation... David Rawlings gets an awfully nice tone out of his old small bodied "budget" Epi archtop) The Carter family used an L-5 in unamplified situs, and it was competing w/their voices and other instruments.
     
  11. stephenT

    stephenT Supporting Member

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  12. urizen

    urizen Gold Supporting Member

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    Apropos of what I and jgm had to say about Nat'l-Resophonic guitars, if you wanted something louder with a difference, one of their tricones, especially the brass-bodied (nickel-plated or polychrome) might be quite a fascinatin' revelation to you----or, if you wanted to stick to wood, you might check out the upcoming El Trovador re-ish from Nat'l-Reso (which is also on me personal shortlist:

    http://elderly.com/images/new_instruments/50N/NGELT.jpg

    or their koa deluxe Estralita:
    http://elderly.com/images/new_instruments/50N/NGEDLX2_front.jpg
     
  13. urizen

    urizen Gold Supporting Member

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  14. urizen

    urizen Gold Supporting Member

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  15. Chops

    Chops Gold Supporting Member

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    I agree. I have guitars with both Adirondack and Sitka tops and the Adirondack does have more cut. For my playing, though, I prefer the Sitka.
     
  16. suttree

    suttree Member

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    get a santa cruz tony rice pro, and you'll like dreadnaughts again, i promise..
     
  17. 62Tele

    62Tele Supporting Member

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    As for the Nationals - and of course this depends on your playing - I really have to recommend the cutaways. These are relatively new for National and after owning two non-cutaway models (a Delphi years ago and a Polychrome Tricone) I really prefer the Resorocket. It just does something different - maybe it's the combo ofthe tricone style vents and the biscuit bridge. And the new stick-on National/Lace pickup is just amazing.

    Don't discount any body material until you sit down with it for awhile. They all have their applications as do all the cone formats. You also have to play the things with some serious attack to get the best tone - when played "like you mean it" the tone tends to round out. A lot of folks play them with a light touch and they can sound kind of thin.
     
  18. elambo

    elambo Member

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    Merrill's are beautiful guitars, but harder to play than Collings and I don't think they're as loud. They pack in a huge mojo though.

    I honestly thought they went out of business because of some family feuding. Is that not the case?
     
  19. elambo

    elambo Member

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    Slightly louder than a Collings? Seriously???

    I have a Collings dread (D2H) and I go deaf if I play it for very long. To call it a cannon would be a huge understatement.
     
  20. drfrankencopter

    drfrankencopter Member

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    I think he meant louder than a Collings 000...

    I've got a Collings 000-2HMSB (Mahogany instead of rosewood)....I love this guitar, it's the first guitar that I've had that makes me want to play slow and really appreciate every single note that comes out of it. There really is magic to it... but yeah it's not a loud instrument. Good for solo, and with voice, but I can see it getting overwhelmed in a band setting.

    Good luck with the search...

    Cheers,

    Kris
     

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