P&W Rigs/Pedalboards

Discussion in 'Effects, Pedals, Strings & Things' started by Abandoned, Feb 12, 2015.

  1. boyce89976

    boyce89976 Silver Supporting Member

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    Loop Community
     
  2. kdm1218

    kdm1218 Supporting Member

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    @boyce89976 black and white band camp pictures are just fine :D
     
  3. Pax

    Pax Silver Supporting Member

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    Very cool pic. Looks like a solid design. I wonder why they didn’t use a threaded metal insert in the neck cavity as well? No matter. That neck isn’t moving anywhere.
     
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  4. boyce89976

    boyce89976 Silver Supporting Member

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    My short experience with my Novo Sectis is it's the most resonant guitar I have. And the neck pocket stability is better than anything short of a set neck.
     
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  5. dickjonesify

    dickjonesify Member

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    You mean Multitracks? Hahaha
     
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  6. boyce89976

    boyce89976 Silver Supporting Member

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    Haha, totally thought it was Loop Community... :p
     
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  7. JokeSmuggler

    JokeSmuggler Supporting Member

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    My 1981 DRV came in today...wow! I was not expecting to be as impressed as I was. I only had about 15 minutes but it took 60 seconds to understand how it has the hype it does. There’s a big range of useable gain, and a powerful cut control. The notes feel like they really pop off the guitar because of the character of the upper mids and it does that high energy squawky thing. I can definitely hear the relient K sound in it. It sounds smoother (not smooth like a TS, but less than something like a tonebender) and not as gappy in the EQ as the demos I’ve seen. I wasn’t expecting much, but was really blown away. Hoopes really came out big on this one!
     
  8. williamh

    williamh Supporting Member

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    Mine should hopefully be shipping this week(finally) after he got backed up on orders. Hopefully will come in early next week. Pretty excited to try it out.
     
  9. roxtc

    roxtc Member

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    Willing!
     
  10. dmutter

    dmutter Member

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    This is my my Bass player's rig these days (he also plays eleectric and acoustic through it).
    @Kylote you will notice that at least the 112 Headrush has 2 inputs with independent volume controls, so for just an acoustic/vocal performance there would be no need for a mini mixer.
     
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  11. Kylote

    Kylote Member

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    I think the Headrushes don’t have mic preamps (so they only accept line level signal, meaning a passive mic like your standard dynamic mic would be too quiet). Most FRFR do have a mic preamp, but being cheaper and guitar modeler focused, I believe these do not. So part of the reason for getting the mini-mixer is that it has a mic preamp built into one channel :D I was looking at a Rolls Mini Mic Preamp but the mini Behringer mixer appears to accomplish the same thing for cheaper and I can add guitar, backing track, etc.

    Of course this is just theoretical knowledge since I don’t have any of this stuff in my possession yet.
     
  12. caledoneus

    caledoneus Member

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    I've been looking into options for an FRFR for my Helix, and you are correct. The Alto 312(?) that the Headrush is based off of does have a mic preamp, but the Headrush does not.
     
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  13. Kylote

    Kylote Member

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    Yep, as far as I understand, the Alto 312 is basically a Headrush 112 with a mic preamp and a different EQ curve. The more guitar modeler focused EQ curve is something I'm interested in (vs. just a general PA EQ of the Alto).

    Alto 308 is $230 and Headrush 108 is $200, so basically the built in mic preamp costs $30. I am willing to add the preamp after the fact (with the mini mixer) if the Headrush EQ sounds better with guitar modelers than the Alto counterpart. Or at least that is why I went Headrush over just an Alto.
     
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  14. Andrew Roy

    Andrew Roy Member

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    I had someone direct me to post this here:

    First off, I spend most of time playing acoustic guitar. I play worship music and right now acoustic is what I am asked to do. However, lately I have had the itch to really dig into the electric. I have never been great at getting tones I want from an electric. Since I have never been great at getting tones from Line 6 stuff and seems lacking sometimes it does have me hesitant about buying a Helix instead of getting an amp and some pedals to go along with it. I do have the Pod HD500x now, and it doesn't seem like it is very intuitive or "easy" to get the tones I want, but that could be lack of patience and understanding.

    If I go with an amp and pedals it's going to look something like this:
    Vox AC15C1
    Little Green Wonder, OCD, BigSky, Timeline, and a PolyTune 3. (Compression, boost, and exp down the line)
    Then you have the power supply, cables, and pedalboard.
    So by the time you get to all of that, obviously it is more than what you would spend on a Helix. Also have a chance to get close to a couple hundred dollars off of it.

    So one of my questions is: Is the Line 6 Helix more user friendly than the Line 6 Pod HD500x? Are the delay and reverb effects on the Helix as good as the BigSky and Timeline? I have listened to demos and it is hard for me to hear a difference in some effects.

    I understand the convience of the Helix (not having to haul pedals and amps, relatively cheaper, etc..), but right now I am leaning towards an amp and some pedals.

    And does it make sense for me to spend more money on amps and pedals and have more gear to haul around compared to the Line 6?

    One other thing that makes me hesitant is our church does not use IEM's and I don't know if that makes a difference.

    I understand a lot of this is personal preference, but I am open to suggestions and opinions. Thanks in advance
     
  15. caledoneus

    caledoneus Member

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    I will go ahead and say that the Helix is actually super intuitive and easy to use for putting together tones. They really designed it with guitar players in mind with the way you can tweak anything really easily.
     
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  16. Gibs210

    Gibs210 Member

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    I’m gonna say if you go pedals, I’d steer away from strymons if an hd500 is too complicated. The menu diving on the strymons take some getting used to and aren’t cut and dry with all the abreviations for each menu. If your stuck on strymons then go blue sky/flint for reverb or dig/el cap/brigadier for delay. My personal preference is source audio, as I don’t like menu diving on pedals and their still just as powerful (if not more powerful in some respects) than the big box strymons, if I need to do deep editing, then I hook it up to the phone app or PC rather than menu dive like strymon, don’t do a ton of PC editing anymore as I have all my presets made up, so PC is less for the pedals and more for setting up my patches on my midi controller for the given set that Sunday.
     
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  17. -Empire

    -Empire Supporting Member

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    I don't know what that is, but I haven't had any issues with running it into the front of the Stomp. Definitely reminded me how noisy analog pedals are in comparison to all-in-one digital units though.

    Yes, it's by far the easiest digital unit I've ever used, including POD bean, POD XT Live, HD500x, Kemper, AxeFX II, AxeFX III, Atomic AF3, and Atomic Ampli-firebox.

    Everything can be done from the unit itself, no computer required, and nothing is buried under layers of menus. Here's a youtube playlist I compiled with a bunch of beginner videos, so you can get an idea of the operation of the unit. The capacitive footswitches thing is genius. Feels just like making adjustments on a real pedalboard.

    I had both of those pedals before making the switch and I do not miss them. Are they exactly the same algorithms? No. Can Helix's models be dialed in to do the "P&W cloud" thing? Yes. Do the nuances come through in an FOH mix? Definitely not. Worth spending $1000 on a delay and reverb for nuance? Not for me.

    This was one of the primary reasons I made the switch after 3+ years of slowly downsizing my rig from two boutique amps and a PT-pro full of boutique pedals.

    It's also worth noting that the direct signal from a well-dialed-in Helix, Kemper, Fractal, or Atomic unit will honestly blow away the signal from a random mic on a Chinese AC15, monitored through the same PA or stage wedges.

    Like I said above, with any of these units, how you monitor is the key. If you plan to run direct, make sure you're comfortable monitoring the signal from a mic on a cab in another room through whatever your church's monitoring paradigm is (probably stage wedges), and you'll be fine.

    If you're more used to having a live guitar cab in the room with you, you'll be better off not running direct, and instead bypassing the cab/mic block, and running an amp model into a neutral power amp and live guitar cab in the room with you. Many people are used to that paradigm, try a modeler through flat response speakers, and then mistakenly blame the modeler for the different monitoring paradigm.

    If you have some decent speakers or headphones at home, check out some of the recent Helix videos on my YouTube channel. Crank them up loud to get a feel for how they will sound live.
     
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2019
  18. Chance

    Chance Member

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    I have Tom Anderson's humbucker sized P90s in my Raven and love them! I also have cut switches going to both of them so I can coil tap the pickups and drop the output to normal single coil like levels with a switch.
     
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  19. kdm1218

    kdm1218 Supporting Member

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    @Andrew Roy welcome to the thread! First off, whatever you decide, I’d encourage you to stick around if you’re wanting to dive in and improve with electric guitar because this core group of posters is a wealth of knowledge about tone, theory, parts in popular P&W songs, and more. Lots to learn from here and we are a friendly bunch.

    My first question to you would be, have you owned an amp and pedals before? I ask because while the particulars are different, you still have to dial in good tone either route. And since you mentioned you didn’t feel like you’d ever gotten good tone with the electric guitar before, I’m not sure if that meant just with the HD500 or in general.

    If you haven’t been used to dialing in delays and reverbs, I would also personally caution you against sinking $850 into the Timeline and BigSky. Not that they aren’t great pedals, but that is already the cost of a used Helix LT and if you don’t really know how to dial them in, they’re not going to sound good or like your favorite songs of this genre either. There are plenty of cheaper more simple pedals that can accomplish a lot. Delays: Boss DD-7 plus a tap switch, EHX Canyon, Digitech Obscura. Reverbs: Boss RV-6, TC Hall of Fame, Digitech Polara. All simple and effective and you can pick any of those up used for just over $100 USD.

    My first electric rig was pedals and I didn’t know what I was doing tone wise or playing technique wise. And I probably sounded terrible. When I really started to grow was when I invested in a couple lessons locally (small city) before transitioning to some online Skype based lessons and video series kind of stuff. But that taught me how to actually dial sounds in, as well as theory knowledge I just never had before but really needed to be able to start learning to play in this genre or really anything for that matter.

    Along the way there I got tired of amp lugging and a 50lb pedalboard, and started down the direct solutions route. After a couple years on that journey I have settled on the HX Stomp with just a couple small mini pedals and it is my full rig. I do have IEMs so that’s not an issue for me on monitoring.

    I will say this on Helix stuff- I was a skeptic for quite a while. But it really is very intuitive to use right on the screen even on the Stomp which doesn’t show you much. And if you hook up to a computer to use HX Edit it gets even easier. There are also great presets available from guys right here on the thread like @-Empire and @yeatzee as well as others like MBritt (of country band Lonestar), Tone Junkies, and more. All quality stuff and you can honestly just pick one to buy for a few bucks and start learning from someone else who has more experience as far as how to set up different effects, amps, etc. Then I found it a lot easier to start there and tweak to my tastes, or start building some of my own patches.

    One more thing on Helix- if you went that route and then decided it wasn’t for you, it’s a lot easier to resell a high end modeler then it is to break apart a pedalboard and sell off that stuff and an amp if you started that route and changed your mind. You do still have to have a monitoring solution like an FRFR such as the Headrush referenced a few posts back, but also still way cheaper all in.

    Long post, TL;DR, yes it’s preference but from someone who’s done both I now prefer the modeling for lots of reasons.
     
  20. thiscalltoarms

    thiscalltoarms more gadgets than Batman. Gold Supporting Member

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    Can you compare the output on the TA humbucker-p90s to other humbuckers we might know? (490r/t, 57 classics, Thornbuckers, etc)?

    EDIT: in terms of OUTPUT.
     

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