PA Recommendations for My Bar Band

Discussion in 'Recording/Live Sound' started by ledvedder, Jan 31, 2020.

  1. Eliju

    Eliju Member

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    The tablet is nice because it's small and doesn't need wires. Also since I do the mix I can walk around the bar. Other than that, there's not really any other advantages. Having a laptop set up is slightly more reliable because you don't have a wifi issue, which like I said, I haven't had since working on a 5ghz network.
     
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  2. dspellman

    dspellman Member

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    I'd suggest you have a separate board and power amp and NOT a powered mixer.

    I've been looking at a Behringer X32 for a project i'm working on, but they came out with something called the WING...
    The X18 (and an iPad) might do you very well.
     
  3. BadAssBill

    BadAssBill southofnash.com Silver Supporting Member

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    If I were in this position I'd get amps for the power and an XR16 for the board. I agree I would not get a powered mixer. 10 years ago we were lugging around an "orange monster" that was what you had...just a monstrous super heavy amp case. It took two people to lift back when my back was okay. We played with some other guys who had a rack and it was easily half the weight...Behringer amps. He said he never had any problems with them either.
     
  4. Milkman

    Milkman Supporting Member

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  5. Allthumbs56

    Allthumbs56 Member

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    Just about every band in our area uses these. Both bands I'm in use them. One band uses Yorkville Elite 15" mains and cheap Yorkville passive monitors. The other uses 12" Elite mains and Yamaha powered DBR10's for monitors. Pretty solid and pretty consistent - I have no complaints and I can set them up with my eyes closed. Only complaint is that the knobs have a habit of coming off and rolling away in the dark.
     
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  6. ToneShapers

    ToneShapers Member

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    My wife and I were going to see some friends play. The venue is outdoors at an upscale theater in Florida, lots of wealthy people, local movers and shakers. The drummer called me at 6:20, sounding panicked. "Man, can you bring a board? We can't get the board working! There are 500 people looking at us, we were supposed to start at 6:00!"

    So my wife and I get there as quick as we can, I have to stop by our shop to pick up a board, a QSC TouchMix 16. This was an ad hoc band, thrown together for this occasion, and one of the guitar players had brought the PA. It was a Behringer digital mixer, and they couldn't get its built-in wifi working, so no connection to the iPad he was going to use to run the thing. They were completely dead in the water, and we got there with the QSC roughly 45 minutes after they were supposed to start playing. The place was packed, lots of people watching us, the stress was high. I was trying to figure out what the rest of the PA was, the snake channels were not marked, we were trying to figure out what mics were in what channels, it was a mess.

    The QSC saved the day. It's a little pricey, but it has a built-in touchscreen display. You can control it remotely from a tablet via wifi (like most of these digital mixers it produces its own wifi network). But if wifi ain't working for you, you can control it via the built-in touchscreen, so you're not dead in the water. My opinion is that this is one of those "get what you pay for" examples.

    Digital mixers do lots of things that analog mixers don't. The other side of that is that analog mixers present all of their controls to you at once, so you have immediate access - right now! - to that one knob that's going to dial out the mic feedback that has everyone grabbing for their ears. There's no wading through menus, though to be fair there's very little wading with the TouchMix, don't know about some of the other brands. Of course, some of the digital mixers have very sophisticated wizards that will ring out the system better than all but the most skilled engineers can do anyway, so if handled properly - even by a novice - you would theoretically have notched out all of frequencies that would be producing mic feedback in the first place.

    I like digital mixers, I've had quality analog mixers too, but digital mixers - if you trust them - use technology in clever ways that solve problems. But after my buddy's experience, I would only buy a digital mixer that can be controlled directly, or via a wired control. Just in case!
     
  7. riffmeister

    riffmeister Member

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    Thats why you must have an external router with the Behringer mixer. Without it - lost connections. With it - no lost connections.
     
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  8. Rod

    Rod Tone is Paramount Supporting Member

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    A $1600 mixer for $300 gigs? plus power amps ?
    I’d recommend a Yamaha SX500 powered mixer. Analog..2 7 band graphic EQ’s for mains and monitors $500.....500 watts rms
    Reliable as the day is long.. We use ours these days as a mixer only and use powered speakers
     
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2020
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  9. sct13

    sct13 Supporting Member

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    We have a soundcraft 16 channel mixer, two Berringer 2400 amps...in stereo, 6 compressors and an old peavey EQ with a lot of bands on either side....we only need the PA for vocals, We have 15" passive cabinets and four wedge monitors. a 150 ft snake cable is nice. and you should have all the same mics....because having a scatter array of crappy and crappy old mics really is a pain in the ass.

    We are severely underpowered unless the mains are bridged. So don't skimp on wattage. you need those vocals cutting above cymbal crashes and loud guitars.

    It takes $$ to drive a good sound system. I am shopping right now for a wireless digital system and its going to run past $4k (from Sweetwater) just need to get the members on board....who are cheap...

    but they are old like me and hate moving the gear around. So lighter and more compact is defiantly a selling point
     
  10. modulusman

    modulusman Member

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    Where did the OP say they were only getting $300.00 gigs? Also no such thing as a SX500 mixer as far as I know. Maybe he should buy a snow mobile instead.:rolleyes:
     
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2020
  11. tpwaterhouse

    tpwaterhouse Member

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    A pair of Yamaha DBR 10'S (700 watts, 23lb each), Behringer 500 watt sub, 43 lbs., Soundcraft Ui16 (really light) in roadcase with Furman power conditioner, pair of Behringer Eurolive powered monitor wedges (250 watts and 23 lbs. each + Polk 100 watt wedge for drummer. Now my 16 channel board is iPad clamped to my mike stand and it's enough clean power to get our six piece band through most gigs, including outdoor.
     
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  12. Tatom

    Tatom Member

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    We switched from passive to powered speakers some years ago. We now use the JBL PRX series (712, 812, 815 etc.) Pair that with a Soundcraft board and it kills it. Super clean with effects. Wouldn't change a thing.
     
  13. Badstrat

    Badstrat Member

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    First of all. Get a good sub. There’s plenty to choose from. They are expensive but worth every dollar if you want good sound. Everyone says get a digital mixer but your moneys better spent on a good sub. A digital or analog desk won’t sound any different. That said I’m looking to get a digital desk and ditch my huge rack and desk.
     
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  14. jamme61

    jamme61 Silver Supporting Member

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  15. mikebat

    mikebat Member

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    I hear ya, but you can get the XR18 for $600 new. It is reliable too, and flexible beyond that Yamaha, which I would gladly use too. The SX is discontinued though, and the EMX5016CF is about $999....so...

    Whatever works, plus, it's your money!
     
  16. iluvfender

    iluvfender Member

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    Since you're playing bars, are you just using the p.a. for vocals ? Or are you miking everything ? What size bars ?
     
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  17. TonyK

    TonyK Member

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    So every thread needs a stupid question, so I'll go for it. Especially as I hope to be in the same position of choosing a system within the next several months. For vocals only or vocals plus a few additional mics, is it not worth considering the Bose-type solutions (L1 Pro I think)? I realise they are not necessarily cheap but from what I've seen in this thread, even if more than one system would be required, the price could still remain "reasonable" (sort of like buying a couple of extra pro-level guitars). "Stupid" aside, are these solutions not really viable for pub/club type gigs? I was very hopeful having heard some great sound quality reviews and the fact that they are so light and fast/easy to set up.
     
  18. Luke V

    Luke V Supporting Member

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    It depends on what type of music you’re playing, they sound fine with acoustic acts but just don’t cut it for a rock band. The vocals just don’t seem to cut through. The midrange doesn’t have the punch that a rock band needs.
     
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  19. Mike Monte

    Mike Monte Member

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    Revisiting the original post:
    In my area most large clubs have an installed system and the small ones don't.
    IMO: just keep-it-simple. Get a http://yorkville.com/mixers/micromix/product/m1610-2/
    or its little brother the m810-2 and call it a day.

    When I had my club/GB band (in the 90's) I used a powered mixer for all of our gigs.
    It was was easy to set up, not complicated at all, (even the chick singer could set it up), not too heavy.

    You already have passive cabs, use them with an upgraded powered mixer (as above).

    Our band did well in our local market, just a little verb on the vocals and sax and that was it.
    You really don't need much.

    I still have my band's mixer (Crate PCMDP..I think) and it still works!
    I have since added a Yorkville m810 to my inventory as it is a lighter option.

    I run a small/local sound company these days thus I have alot of bells'n whistles (A&H digital boards, Itech amps, etc.) but if I was playing in a band (as you mentioned), powered mixer is the way that I'd go.
     
  20. modulusman

    modulusman Member

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    Did you notice the picture he included showed subwoofers? That Yorkville mixer you showed is the wrong tool for the job. But since the OP bailed on his thread and won't tell us what speakers he is using no one can really give him any good advice.
     
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