Paint, Or Not To Paint

ucsteve

Member
Messages
100
Ive been experimenting on several of my cheaper, mass produced guitars. I Like using various stains and use Tung quite a bit. I can lay it on pretty thick and hand buff the tackyness out, or i can get it pretty sunk into the wood and work in into a nice coat. Ill prob have to redo it in a couple years maybe. but that will just add to its flavour i figure
 

brentrocks

Guitar Hack/Player
Gold Supporting Member
Messages
4,236
The guitar is at our shop, which is 30 miles from my house. I went over and checked on it yesterday. The oil is drying slowly. I'm thinking at this point, i may let it set until Wednesday or Thursday before i do final sanding and apply the first coat of poly.
 

brentrocks

Guitar Hack/Player
Gold Supporting Member
Messages
4,236
Another change. I’m doing lacquer now. Lol. I talked to a guy that used to spray for heritage guitars in Kalamazoo. He convinced me that lacquer was the way to go.

Now that the grain fill was dry, I put coat of shellac on it this morning to seal the oil in. I’m going to wet sand with 800 next and then spray the first coat of lacquer.
 

Arcadia

Supporting Member
Messages
1,821
Korina takes oil finishes well. You could hand rub oil on it. That's what I did with my Korina guitar. Just be sure to put it on in very thin layers and wipe off the excess. Also, you can reapply later if you want. I went with a PURE tung oil. It's a very very nice finish IMHO. I'd also beware of oils with harsh chemicals in them.

But yeah if you want paint, I'd send it off to someone to be professionally sprayed with NITRO.
 

Arcadia

Supporting Member
Messages
1,821
What’s your opinions on Tru oil?
I looked into this when I finished mine and decided against it. It contains nasty spirit varnish chemicals... plus I've heard linseed can degrade over time. Honestly for an oil finish for me it would be pure tung or just paint it.
 

brentrocks

Guitar Hack/Player
Gold Supporting Member
Messages
4,236
Is it just the lighting, or will it still take many coats to completely level the pores of the grain?
That’s only 3 very light coats. Very light. And I have sanded with 800 between them. I’m not putting it on very heavy. I’m not sure if I will be able to completely cover all the grain pores.
 

wire-n-wood

Supporting Member
Messages
4,291
IMO, the best natural finish is tung oil. I have a black korina guitar, and an American ash tele that I built, and finished with only tung oil. They both look great.

It's natural, and non-toxic. It is super-easy to apply. It's practically impossible to screw it up. A durable finish, and it ages beautifully.
 

treeofpain

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
7,036
With open pore wood like this, you can either grain fill it until it is flat before spraying the finish, or else you put a lot of coats of finish, sanding between each one. This is a time to be very patient. Good work so far Brent!
 

brentrocks

Guitar Hack/Player
Gold Supporting Member
Messages
4,236
With open pore wood like this, you can either grain fill it until it is flat before spraying the finish, or else you put a lot of coats of finish, sanding between each one. This is a time to be very patient. Good work so far Brent!
Evidently I didn’t grain fill enough?
 

treeofpain

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
7,036
One option is to sand back down as flat as you can and apply more grain filler until perfectly flat after sanding. Look at it at an angle to verify the grain is absolutely positively filled with no voids. Then start applying finish. It is best to do this if you are wanting a factory type finish.

It is easy to talk yourself into "fixing it as you go" but that almost never works. It is like building a house where the framing is not quite square.
 

MaxTwang

Member
Messages
3,124
When spraying lacquer it may be best to spray outside then move the guitar inside to dry. Lacquer fumes are dangerous to your lungs and extremely flammable.

Re. buffing - check out the foam pads at StewMac, they work great and are reasonably priced. I've used them quite a few times with StewMac buffing compounds and the Meguiar's products sold by LMII . Remember to keep the buffing pads moving because if you stay on one spot you'll heat up and melt the lacquer.








 
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brentrocks

Guitar Hack/Player
Gold Supporting Member
Messages
4,236
One option is to sand back down as flat as you can and apply more grain filler until perfectly flat after sanding. Look at it at an angle to verify the grain is absolutely positively filled with no voids. Then start applying finish. It is best to do this if you are wanting a factory type finish.

It is easy to talk yourself into "fixing it as you go" but that almost never works. It is like building a house where the framing is not quite square.
Do you think if I was to wet sand with 400, and basically take it down to my original shellac coat and start over with lacquer again, that it would be enough to flatten it out?
 




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