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Painting Advice for Squier Telecaster

BPF55555

Senior Member
Messages
722
So about 3 years ago, my friend gave me this Rolling RockSquier Telecaster (Not very good). I plan on repainting, installing new PUP’s, and putting a new pickguard on it. I already asked a question about putting a Fender Tex-Mex PUP in the Bridge (I bought an Arctec for the Neck). I've restored guitars in the past and sanded them down to bare wood. Now, I'm not really interested in doing that for this guitar, so my plan is to sand the surface with sanding paper to get through the Finish - so that the Primer will have something to adhere to. Then I’ll paint it, and then do multiple coats of Poly. Is this a bad idea? Any suggestions? I mean, I know the right way to do it would be to sand all the Finish and Paint off, but I'm trying to avoid that. (I'm being lazy). Does anyone have advice for me? Also, what are some good tuning pegs in the $40.00 - $50.00 range? Thanks guys, Brian
 

BPF55555

Senior Member
Messages
722
Also, I'm doing this because I enjoy restoring/working/f@cking around with guitars and fixing them up.
 

losergeek

Member
Messages
567
I've done a similar thing with a bass in the past, and although I'm still learning a lot about this here's a couple things I've come up with...hopefully more knowledgeable people will chime in to add to, or argue against my points.

I've found that the best paint is just automotive spray paint - it seems to be the most resillient...but don't cheap out on this too much - I've found the difference between a 5$ and an 8$ can makes the difference between one that sprays nicely and evenly and one that's going to cause endless frustration and globs. Also, and this might go without saying (it didn't for me), but I originally thought that to get that really glossy, mirror finish, you just needed more coats. Turns out, the way to do this is actually sanding and buffing at the end - search online for more exact tips, but basically once you're done you want to wet sand with at least a 1500 grit paper and then buff out the finish with a automotive polishing compound. Alternatively, you can just sand it with 1500 or higher to leave it with a matte finish, which I tend to prefer anyway.

After all is done, the only other advice I have is to let it sit long enough to cure - paint can take up to 30 days to reach it's full 'durability' - it'll seem dry and you can definitely use it, however it's going to be much more prone to scratching - I ended up with some real crazy buckle rash on my bass because of this (not that it really bothers me).

Again, this is all amature, trial and error advice from me....I'd love to hear someone chime in with better tips.
 

BPF55555

Senior Member
Messages
722
Thanks for the tips....I bought Rustoleum Metallic Black Paint (It was like 8 bucks - looks awesome) as well a Rustoleum Primer. But you think I can get by with just roughly sanding the body (not down to bare wood), so that the Primer adheres to it? Thanks
 

losergeek

Member
Messages
567
Thanks for the tips....I bought Rustoleum Metallic Black Paint (It was like 8 bucks - looks awesome) as well a Rustoleum Primer. But you think I can get by with just roughly sanding the body (not down to bare wood), so that the Primer adheres to it? Thanks
That's what I did and it seemed to work - just roughed it up really nice with something around 100 grit paper I think. Now, will this last 20 years? Who knows...and I won't because I already traded the bass to someone else.
 






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