Paisley Tele-like FINISH question... (project guitar)

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by SW33THAND5, Feb 15, 2012.

  1. SW33THAND5

    SW33THAND5 Member

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    ok boys... its my understanding that the fender paisley finishes that fender did in the 60s were basically CON-TACT paper applied to the body and then they put a small fade/burst of color around the edges to hide the edge of the CON-TACT paper. Then they would cover it all with a urethane/poly type clear-coat....


    now here is my question(s)

    #1 i have heard of people using other materials like cloth or wrapping paper:huh how do they adhere these materials to the body of the guitar to keep the underside from bubbling up underneath the clear coat? is this all rubbish...or can it be done?

    or do i have to use a CON-TACT type of paper or wallpaper...


    THANKS! any help would be appreciated. :hiP
     
  2. SW33THAND5

    SW33THAND5 Member

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  3. stratoskier

    stratoskier Member

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    I've done quite a few fabric finishes. Usually I sand to bare wood and use Titbond wood glue spread evenly on the body to apply the fabric. After drying, you seal the fabric (fill pores in cloth) with multiple applications of sanding sealer. This fills and disguishes the transition from cloth to edge on rounded edge bodies. Then trim edges of fabric, color coat edges of body with slight overlap to top. Clear coat. Complete description is available in the tutorial at Project Guitar.

    On one recent project, I decided to try one without complete stripping. I used Weldwood contact cement. It worked, but it was a lot harder to get it right.

    As far as the bubbles, etc -- this shouldn't be a huge problem on a flat surface body like a Tele, but is much more so on a curvy shape like an Ibanez JS. Nonetheless, I always have to do some spot repair by carefully slicing the area with an exacto knife, putting some wood glue or super glue below the fabric, and pressing the fabric down with painter's tape. Once the clear coat is applied, you can't tell a repair was done.

    One tip -- it can take a LOT of sanding sealer and then clear coat to fill the pores and get a smooth finish. You'll be amazed at how many coats one of these projects will eat.

    Here's one I did awhile back:
    [​IMG]

    Have fun!
     
  4. bumblefingers

    bumblefingers Member

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  5. SW33THAND5

    SW33THAND5 Member

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    ok...what kind of sanding sealer do you use. i have done a few nitro refinishes and the sanding sealer was almost like a putty suspended in a lacquer :huh wouldn't that affect the color of the print?


    btw... that is a kick ass strat:omg
     
  6. Tele71

    Tele71 Gold Supporting Member

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    You can get rattle cans of sanding sealer. Or I just cut my lacqure about 40/60 with lacqure thinner and use that as sealer. I increase the the percentage of lacqure as I apply additional coats until I get the desired mil thickness. I tend to keep my finishes on the lighter side but you can build them up to any thickness you want. Curing and drying time is critical to a good finish as is sanding between coats.
     
  7. stratoskier

    stratoskier Member

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    I've used Parks Sanding Sealer and more recently MinWax. Both are clear liquid in a quart can. You just brush it on (I like the sponge brushes). I generally go with about 3 coats, then light sanding and on to the clear coat. The Project Guitar tutorial has pictures that demonstrate how the first coat of sealer hardens the fabric, making it easy to trim around the edges of the body. After it's trimmed up, a few more coats of sealer will smooth out the seam at the edge of the fabric. Some light sanding along that interface makes it invisible.

    Thanks. It actually has a rosewood neck on it now, which it seems to like. This one gets several hours of play time every day.
     

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