Partsocaster question

Discussion in 'Luthier's Guitar & Bass Technical Discussion' started by Rockinrob86, Apr 18, 2008.

  1. Rockinrob86

    Rockinrob86 Supporting Member

    Messages:
    3,432
    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2007
    Location:
    Tampa, Fl
    I have a strat partsocaster with a neck from musikraft, and a guitar mill body.

    The problem is that either the neck is too thick, or the body is too thick at the joint. It works out that if I have the action on the bridge adjusted to the highest setting, it is perfect! But the problem is that this creates a huge break angle for the strings at the saddle, so I break strings like crazy unless I do the SRV trick where you put wire insulation around the string to protect it at the break angle. I don't really break strings too badly with the SRV fix, but still more than I would regularly on a strat. Also the guitar feels stiff, but I switched to 10's for this guitar and it feels better with them.

    I was thinking that I could use a belt sander to take just a bit off of the neck at the joint to get the thickness right. I dont want to ruin it though, as it works like it is. I would just rather use 11's like on my other guitars and not break strings so badly. It this a stupid idea? Suggestions for the best fix for this?
     
  2. clothwiring

    clothwiring Supporting Member

    Messages:
    6,735
    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2006
    Location:
    Central NY
    I would take it to a luthier and explain what's going on. Taking a belt sander is a good way to get it uneven (unless you really know what you're doing) and you could end up ruining the neck. Good luck on that, I understand the frustration as I've done a few parts guitars.
     
  3. sugarlou

    sugarlou Supporting Member

    Messages:
    3,656
    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2006
    Location:
    New Jersey
    Yeah, I agree..it would be difficult if not impossible to get the back of the neck flat w/ a homeowner type belt sander. Plus if you think about how much material needs to be removed it's pretty considerable ..1/8 inch or 1/4!! Thats a lot to ask.
     
  4. Wymore Guitars

    Wymore Guitars Member

    Messages:
    64
    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2008
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    I honestly think it would be easier to route the pocket deeper than to take wood off the neck. A decent luthier should be able to do it fairly easily with a router and a template.
     
  5. jkats

    jkats Member

    Messages:
    139
    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2004
    Location:
    Portland, ME
    I would place a shim at the tuning head end of the neck pocket first -- just cut up a piece of a business card and see if that changes the neck angle enough to allow you to bring the saddle height down. This is common - Fender itself would use neck shims on new instruments, and this is a good feature of the bolt-on neck concept. You'd be surprised how small a shim is needed to make this adjustment. I'd start with this quick, easy, conservative step first before routing the pocket or sanding the bottom of the neck.
     
  6. walterw

    walterw Gold Supporting Member

    Messages:
    33,549
    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2006
    +1 changing the angle of the neck's flat bottom by just a degree or 2 can translate to 1/8" worth of saddle height difference. try the shim first.
     
  7. Rockinrob86

    Rockinrob86 Supporting Member

    Messages:
    3,432
    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2007
    Location:
    Tampa, Fl
    I think I will try the shim. This isnt a huge problem, because it is one of my favorite playing guitars. I just know that I could set it up the same, but not break as many strings.
     

Share This Page