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Pearl Jam - Ten 30 Years Old & No Code 25 Years Old Today!

BigAl

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1,124

risto

Member
Messages
468
F*ck I’m getting old! I remember waiting in line to get inside, Ft Lauderdale 10/7/96. Fastbacks and Ben Harper opened. Eddie climber up into the speaker towers. Hurricane Josephine almost cancelled it. Saw them 5 or 6 times afterwards, on various tours. Always a fun show. Love those guys.
 

ggwwbb

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
5,789
Just got done listening to it in honor of the anniversary. I remember reading a review of it in Rolling Stone a week or two before it was released and, seeing that it was made up of guys from Temple of the Dog (which I already owned and loved), got it the day it came out. It blew my 22 year old mind. I listened to part of the first song on the way home from the record store, then when I got home, I laid down on the floor in front of the stereo, and started it over. I'll never forget how it made me feel listening to it for the first time and it still makes me feel the same way every time I hear it. I'll never get tired of it. Top 3 record for me.
 

Droliver

Member
Messages
522
God I hated that “10” album back then. It was just played to death.

As a 21 yo alt rock fan at the time weaned on REM and The Replacements, they (Pearl Jam) were such a poseur grunge act to me compared to Nirvana, whom seemed much more authentic and important, a determination that has been validated over time. The whole stream of bands out of Seattle in those 91-94 years after Nirvana was a low point for good music as I saw it (except for The Posies whom were nothing like grunge)
 

Killcrop

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
11,885
God I hated that “10” album back then. It was just played to death.

As a 21 yo alt rock fan at the time weaned on REM and The Replacements, they (Pearl Jam) were such a poseur grunge act to me compared to Nirvana, whom seemed much more authentic and important, a determination that has been validated over time. The whole stream of bands out of Seattle in those 91-94 years after Nirvana was a low point for good music as I saw it (except for The Posies whom were nothing like grunge)
That is a bizarre take. PJ basically invented the genre.
 

supergenius365

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
11,409
I saw them on the second Lalapalooza tour in "Chicago" (it was the suburbs, really). I remember rain pouring down my face and singing "I'm still alive!" (which I now know is not the life affirming anthem I thought it was back then).
Vs. is still my favorite album.
 

Strummerfan

Member
Messages
4,194
Ten is a good album. Not a great one, and not one worthy of all the hyperbole I'm seeing in this thread, but it was a good album. I still listen to it from time to time. The best band out of the Seattle scene in that era was Soundgarden. No debate.
 

Killcrop

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
11,885
Ten is a good album. Not a great one, and not one worthy of all the hyperbole I'm seeing in this thread, but it was a good album. I still listen to it from time to time. The best band out of the Seattle scene in that era was Soundgarden. No debate.
I like SG but they just don’t have the catalog of songs PJ has. PJ first 3 albums are pretty epic.
 

Strummerfan

Member
Messages
4,194
I like SG but they just don’t have the catalog of songs PJ has. PJ first 3 albums are pretty epic.
For my taste, all the original run of Soundgarden albums are excellent end to end. Even the Screaming Life and Fopp Ep's are great. The reunion stuff, not so much. Whereas with Pearl Jam, I only ever really got into Ten. There are good songs on some other albums, but nothing all killer no filler in my opinion. YMMV.
 

bikeracr

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
1,268
I remember a lot of the same sentiments in the early 90s as I'm seeing 30 years later in this thread. So instead of simple sweeping generalizations like have been made by both camps in the comments above, let's hear rational arguments from each group...
 

the_Chris

It's All Been Done Before
Silver Supporting Member
Messages
3,819
I like SG but they just don’t have the catalog of songs PJ has. PJ first 3 albums are pretty epic.
Hmm, what about “Badmotorfinger”, “Superunknown” and “Down on the Upside”? All 3 were equally as great as anything PJ has released (especially “Superunknown” - that record was brilliant on so many levels).

This may not be popular opinion, but my favorite PJ records are probably “Ten”, “Vs”, “Yield” and the S/T (“Avocado” record). “No Code” and “Vitalogy” are decent records, but I wasn’t sold as an entire listen.

That live concert was fantastic - how great was Stone doing lead duties on “Mankind”?
 

Simon

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
7,292
I've always felt that Grunge was the last big Hoorah for rock music.
It's the only time in my life in which radio practically changed over night.

Big bands like Winger we're almost instantly gone, and bands like Nirvana, PJ etc felt refreshing, it seemed the guitar had gone full circle and playing less became more again.
Especially with Nirvana, they had great songs that didn't need solos, kinda like The Ramone's.

And yes! PJ is a great band. I'm Glad they're still doing It.
Grunge had some fine guitar players and really great singers. Chris Cornell is on my top ten favorite singers list.

Another thing I'll ad is that The Replacements pre date all of these bands, unless I'm mistaken?
They could have been household names if they weren't the most self destructive band ever.

The book about them is called Trouble Boys, and is a great read.

I always liked this one.

 
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Droliver

Member
Messages
522
I've always felt that Grunge was the last big Hoorah for rock music.
It's the only time in my life in which radio practically changed over night.
We all have our lenses we remember that era through, but I don’t really remember it like that at all. Nirvana’s “Nevermind” and grunge was bookended to me between the late 80’s college rock push and the mid 90’s alt-rock/Lollapalooza/Lilith Fair peaks.

Rolling Stone, Spin, and even MTV with 120 Minutes (kind of the arbiters of taste at the time) were pushing bands like New Order, Depeche Mode, The Cure, The Smiths, The Replacements, The pixies, REM, Concrete Blonde, Jane’s Addiction, Nine Inch Nails In the years leading up to Nirvana breaking through.

Hearing REM on the pop charts in 1986 with their “Document” LP was when I remember thinking radio changed to me and was the continuum that leads to Nirvana having the space to break through
 




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