Pedal Steal Licks

blues3544

Member
Messages
7
I gotta say again, I am new to this website and I'm just blown away. The players and information are phenomenal and I can literally spend all day here searching and educating myself with every thing about it. Alright, back to what I was originally going to ask, I am looking for some cool pedal steal licks to incorporate into my playing, can anyone recommend where I might go or what I might buy?

muchas gracias.

Derrick.
 

jordanL

Member
Messages
1,479
Take a look at some country guitar books. on the Gear Side a Compressor can be useful.

One thing to keep in mind is that the bend needs a different fell from a blues band, its faster and more 'mechanical' sounding, you're trying to emulate a pedal pulling on the string. at the same time you hold down a fretted note on another string. Heres 2 licks that are pretty common, in the first one the bend is on the third string, the second occurs on the second string. In the first the 9th is bent to the major third, the 2nd has the b7th to the root.


------8-------8-------|-12-----------12-----
------8-------8-------|-11-b-13----r--11--
--7---b--9---r--7---|------------------------
-----------------------|------------------------
-----------------------|------------------------
-----------------------|------------------------
 

Garygtr

Almost as good!
Gold Supporting Member
Messages
7,435
If you are brand new to this technique, see if you can find one of Arlen Roth's HotLicks videos on country guitar. If you already know some of the basic licks, check out Truefire.com, they have some Hellecasters stuff that you can download for a couple bucks. If you want to really get into it, see if you can find a copy of Jerry Donahue's instructional video (I forget what company put it out-I don't think it was HotLicks)-that man is out there!:cool:
Also, GP mag did a feature on Johnny Hiland within the past couple years, he has some very cool steel licks also. And finally, check out the late great Roy Buchanan for some steel licks in a blues context :dude

Hope that helps...
 

Jon Silberman

10Q Jerry & Dickey
Silver Supporting Member
Messages
42,050
Take the National Guitar Workshop's Hot Country Licks class this summer like jordanl and I did in '01. Seriously - it worked for us and it'll work for you (plus you get a week to hit the clubs on Broadway in Nashville every evening where you'll get to see and hear pedal steel-like Tele licks performed in person 'til the cows come home).
 

Jack Walker

Waka52
Silver Supporting Member
Messages
866
I been doing these for a pretty long time. I started by listening to pedal steel players in some of the slower mainstream standard country songs.
Chromatic descending sixth chords are a good steel emulation and easy to play on a "5 chord" turn around. For instance in the key of F with C being the five, on the last four beats you play C6,B6, Bflat6, Bflat, return to F for the completion of the turnaround. If you use a compressor to get the "Nashville squash" sound, little slap back delay and a good volume pedal, you can get pretty close to a steel player. The middle position on a Tele or the out of phase positons on a strat work well in providing a good tone for steel emulation. I usually turn my amp up a bit and back off the volume pedal. I use Ernie Ball pedals because it is easy to adjust the pot so the volume comes on quickly. It's much easier to get the pedal steel crying sound when your volume pedal doesn't have to travel from completely off to completely on. Then you just have to develop a touch between picking the string(s) and rolling on the pedal at the same time. I have also developed a hybrid pick and fingers method like most country players so you can pick three or four notes simultaneously while bending one or more of the strings. For example playing an A, E, C# on the top three strings (E, B ,G strings)at the fifth position or an A (triad?) lends itself to an easy C# to D to back to C# bend on the Gstring. Or A to Asus to A. If you pick all strings simultaneously while rolling on the volume pedal and then with your middle finger (bird) bend the C# to D to C# you can simulate the classic "root to rootsus to root" lick you hear so much in country music. Many times I'll swell the volume pedal on the intial A again on the Asus and finally on the return to A.

These couple of licks will help you get a feel on steel simulation. Provided you can decipher what I'm trying to say here. As you can tell, I'm not an instructor.

Good Luck!
 

jackaroo

Member
Messages
5,107
A great lick is :

The third finger at the 14th fret A string, Pinky 14th fret D string, Index at the 11th fret G string. Pluck all three at once and pull down on the G string untill you've gone up in pitch a whole tone. Works over an E major chord. Play the Low E string and check your accuracy.The trick is not moving the pinky and ring finger while you bend the index, and doing the bend tight and exact. All kinds of licks come from this one, but it takes some practice.
 

TonyV

Member
Messages
618
Originally posted by fatang
I picked up the DVD "Pedal Steel Licks for Guitar" by Forest Tucker and there's a lot of great material there.

Here are a couple of cool links:

http://www.fenderplayersclub.com/pdfs/lessons/pedal_steel_licks.pd

http://www.wholenote.com/default.asp?iTarget=http://www.wholenote.com/cgi-bin/page_view.pl?l=147
You mean Forest Rogers, Forest Tucker was Sgt O'Rouke on F Troop. I hear Larry Storch has a Dulcimer DVD ;)

The Forest Rogers DVD is lower on this page
http://www.musicridge.com/steel_guitar.htm
 

Garygtr

Almost as good!
Gold Supporting Member
Messages
7,435
Originally posted by jackaroo
A great lick is :

The third finger at the 14th fret A string, Pinky 14th fret D string, Index at the 11th fret G string. Pluck all three at once and pull down on the G string untill you've gone up in pitch a whole tone. Works over an E major chord. Play the Low E string and check your accuracy.The trick is not moving the pinky and ring finger while you bend the index, and doing the bend tight and exact. All kinds of licks come from this one, but it takes some practice.
Ooh yeah, love this stuff-here's a variation of that:
First, position your fingers as described above and execute the bend and release-this is your "E"
Next, drop your third finger one half step to the 13th fret (Bb) and execute the same bend/release with your first finger-this gives you F#9
Now replace your third finger with your second finger at the 12th fret on your A string (A) and execute the same bend/release with your first finger, this gives you an Amaj7! Resolve to an "E" with a G# in the bass (11th fret on the A, 9th fret on the D and G). If you want to get whackier with that Amaj7, you can add a half step bend in addition to the whole step bend on the G string, so you're going (in single notes on the G string) from F# (starting point) to G# (first bend), and then bending an additional half step up to A, then releasing back to the starting point of F#-cool, huh?

Now here's another with an old school country ballad feel (ala "Green Grass of Home") for a I-I7-IV-IVm progression:

In the key of "E" again, assume the position (!) from the first lick-3rd finger 14th fret on A string, pinky 14th fret on D string, first finger 11th fret on G string..
Execute the whole step bend and release on the G string-this again is your "E"
Now, your fingering will change-lift your third finger and replace with your pinky at the 14th fret on the A string (B). Place your second finger on the 12th fret on the D string (D)-your first finger remains on the G string at the 11th fret. Execute the whole step bend and release on the G string-this covers an E7.
Time to change positions again-place your pinky on the 12th fret on the A string (A). Your third finger goes to the 11th fret on the D string (C#). Now put your first finger on the 9th fret of the G string (E)....do you see how we have gone from an "E" chord shape to a "C" chord shape? Now execute a whole step bend and release on the G string-this is your "A" chord.
Lastly, lift your third finger and place your second finger on the 10th fret on the D string (C) and execute your whole step bend and release-this is your Am! You can then again resolve to that E chord with the G# in the bass...
Notice too in the "E" shape you raise the 9th up to the third, so you have the standard E chord voicing after you bend, whereas with the "C" chord shape, you have the standard chord voicing before you bend, and then you raise the 5th up a whole step.....and also, that Am from the second riff can also function as a D7 in another place...

I think both these riffs are courtesy Arlen Roth, either from his old GP columns or his Hot Licks videos...:cool:
 

Jack Walker

Waka52
Silver Supporting Member
Messages
866
I think we should collaborate and start a company....

I'll try this one when I get home. Can't wait to get more hand cramps.
 

Garygtr

Almost as good!
Gold Supporting Member
Messages
7,435
Oh wait, almost forgot this very simple one courtesy the late great Roy Buchanan, works great in a slow blues:
If you are in "E", when you go to the IV chord (A), place your third finger on the 7th fret of the A string (E), your first finger on the 5th fret of the D string (G), and your second finger on the 6th fret G string (C#)-this gives you an A7 chord (imagine that the 5th fret low E is fretted (A) to help identify the chord)....now, simply bend that G string up a half step (C# to D)-this gives you an A7 to an A7sus-and release to go back to A7. Move it up 2 frets when the V chord (B) comes around....

This lick is standard Roy, but I think you can hear it on "After Hours" on the Second Album among other places :dude
 

Jack Walker

Waka52
Silver Supporting Member
Messages
866
Man, I used to watch old Roy play quite a bit when I lived in Washington.
He could make that Tele cry like a baby. (and make me want to sell my guitar)
 

Garygtr

Almost as good!
Gold Supporting Member
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7,435
Originally posted by Jack Walker
Man, I used to watch old Roy play quite a bit when I lived in Washington.
He could make that Tele cry like a baby. (and make me want to sell my guitar)
He was truly the man as far as I'm concerned-he pioneered so much of the stuff that is standard Tele vocabularly now. Those first two albums of his are must-haves...
 

scottyboy

Member
Messages
410
Originally posted by TonyV [/i]
You mean Forest Rogers, Forest Tucker was Sgt O'Rouke on F Troop. I hear Larry Storch has a Dulcimer DVD ;)

Tony V-a classic, Larry Storch has a dulcimer dvd. this thought will keep me chuckling for some time. i use to love F Troop. not too many times you get to use these names on a guitar site.

thanks

scott
 

Jack Walker

Waka52
Silver Supporting Member
Messages
866
You know Danny Gatton was also a mainstay at that time on the Washington scene. Many felt that Gatton was the better player.
I felt it was more like " what's your preference; Ferrari or Lamborghini"
I remember hearing Gatton and saying to myself " yeah, Gatton's got Roy by a little bit". Then I would hear Roy again and think "Maybe he's passed ole' Danny by." I'm not sure, but I think a local ordinance prevented them from playing on the same stage. Not enough fire extinguishers.
 

Garygtr

Almost as good!
Gold Supporting Member
Messages
7,435
Originally posted by Jack Walker
You know Danny Gatton was also a mainstay at that time on the Washington scene. Many felt that Gatton was the better player.
I felt it was more like " what's your preference; Ferrari or Lamborghini"
I remember hearing Gatton and saying to myself " yeah, Gatton's got Roy by a little bit". Then I would hear Roy again and think "Maybe he's passed ole' Danny by." I'm not sure, but I think a local ordinance prevented them from playing on the same stage. Not enough fire extinguishers.
I'm a big Gatton fan also...IMO Danny had more technique and was more fluent in jazz, but I think Roy had him in tone, feel and soul...again, my opinion. That being said, I think Gatton's version of "In My Room" is one of the most beautiful instrumentals ever...but I sure like Roy's "Sweet Dreams" and "The Messiah Will Come Again"...tough call!
 




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