Pedalboard power supply options?

LEGO

Member
Messages
5
To start off, here's my situation:

I've got about 5 9V dc pedals, a digitech whammy and a Line 6 M13, which are both 9V ac, all which i am setting up on a pedaltrain pro.
Basically, I am looking for 1 power supply i can rig to the bottom which has at least 5 dc, and 2 ac ports. Most of the power supplys ive been looking at only have 1 ac port.

I found a couple which work out for me (but have problems):
Dunlop MC-403 MXR: pretty much every vender online has the same goup of pictures, and one of them being something that doesn't look like the other pictures.

CIOKS AC10: damn near impossible to find a reputable vender (in US), or any vender for that matter.


If anyone could back-up the MC-403 or find me a reputable vender in the US of the CIOKS AC10 that would be great!

thanks
 

kenneth

Member
Messages
932
I used the pedal power, and added a three plug short extension cord/conditioner under to handle the AC pedals. If you are using the pedtrain pro, I would think there would be more then enough room to do this. It was tight with the pedal train Jr.

You should check the power ratings of the pedals, but i think they are all pretty reasonable in general.
 

soundguruman

Member
Messages
140
To start off, here's my situation:

I've got about 5 9V dc pedals, a digitech whammy and a Line 6 M13, which are both 9V ac, all which i am setting up on a pedaltrain pro.
Basically, I am looking for 1 power supply i can rig to the bottom which has at least 5 dc, and 2 ac ports. Most of the power supplys ive been looking at only have 1 ac port.

I found a couple which work out for me (but have problems):
Dunlop MC-403 MXR: pretty much every vender online has the same goup of pictures, and one of them being something that doesn't look like the other pictures.

CIOKS AC10: damn near impossible to find a reputable vender (in US), or any vender for that matter.


If anyone could back-up the MC-403 or find me a reputable vender in the US of the CIOKS AC10 that would be great!

thanks
The main trouble with pedal board power supplies is that a lot of them add AC noise to the audio chain.
Ideally, there would be choke and capacitor filtering, very beefy, with separate 9V regulator for each output jack. It would have enough filtering to equal the performance of a good stereo amplifier.
Advantage of that being that when you run several pedals off the same power, you can get a lot of inter-modulation through the power wiring.

The power supply needs to perform like a battery, no noise at all. Not even a little bit.
You see, when the amplifier is high gain, it will amplify any added noise hundreds of times. That's why you need a very quiet power supply.

Ideally then, you would take a stock unit and have a tech beef it up, till it was perfectly quiet. OR build one from scratch.
Unfortunately, most stock units do not produce the quietest power possible. Some of them are downright noisy, like Buzzzzzzzzzz.
And so it's hard to say what you are buying, unless it comes with very specific performance specifications, like voltage, current, ripple rejection, noise measurements, etc...

And then even more ideally, the power supply transformer would be located away from the pedals, to minimize the AC field affect on the audio path. It is very easy for an audio circuit located near a transformer to pick up and amplify the 60 cycle noise. That's why you have so much 60 cycle noise in these systems.
But as you can see, it is possible to get most of the noise out, through careful planning.
 

Julia343

Member
Messages
7,611
I have the Gator stuff and it's just fine. BTW I think the Whammy uses a 12v power supply and has a positive ground. Don't quote me on that though, check your Digitech power supply or look at the pedal itself.
 




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