People of the late 70's. What did you do to deserve this?

Discussion in 'The Pub' started by jcmark611, Jul 19, 2019.

  1. Badtone

    Badtone Supporting Member

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    At the time we thought American cars of the 50's were undesirable for their looks, etc., not modern enough like the cool stuff coming out Detroit - and they could had very cheaply. In high school (early 70's) it was popular to buy beater 60's muscle cars and do horrible mods to them. Now, of course, had we bought those and taken care of them we could sell a few and buy a 'burst.

    Having said that, I just can't see a 75 Monte Carlo bringing major bucks in the future, but we'll see what comes...
     
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  2. Sidney Vicious

    Sidney Vicious Member

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    :spit
     
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  3. Sidney Vicious

    Sidney Vicious Member

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    Yeah but plaintiff's lawyers like them!
     
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  4. Old Possum

    Old Possum Member

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    No doubt American car makers were having tough times back then. I had a 72 Buick LeSabre that I still wish I had to this day. It was used, but had the 454 big block.....it was like riding on air in a rocket with power everything included. before I had it, I never knew cars like that had that much power. In 86 I bought a new Mustang GT High Output and loved the quickness of it, but I know that LeSabre would swallow it whole.
     
    Last edited: Jul 20, 2019
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  5. Boris Bubbanov

    Boris Bubbanov Member

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    Some American car makers offered Safety but the Fords and Chevies were new, stylish, fancier looking and also cheaper. Kaiser full sized cars had a fully padded dash by about 1952. Studebaker offered a smaller but safer to operate sedan, than the Plymouths, Fords and Pontiacs that sold so well. Hudsons were always a better bet, to be in in a collision but the Market pushed them aside in time. Mercedes, Saab and Volvo offered safety but their market was very different.
     
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  6. Tom CT

    Tom CT Old Supporting Member Gold Supporting Member

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    The original version in HD without the silly music -
     
  7. soundchaser59

    soundchaser59 Silver Supporting Member

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    And 8 feet of hood sticking out front. I'm alive today because of a 1962 Gran Torino overloaded with real steel and a long front end. Due to very peculiar circumstances I rear ended a bulldozer on a country gravel road. We think the car was going 40-45 at impact. The bulldozer didn't move an inch. The car bounced 10 feet backwards. The steering column got pushed back into the drivers space, and my face hit the steering wheel even though I had a shoulder strap. Without that 8 feet of steel front end sticking out my head would have been smashed against the 6x6 inch iron push bar on the back of that bulldozer. If I had been driving a new car with all of those "safety features" I would not be here now. It's a miracle that steering wheel didn't hit my eyes or my teeth, just my forehead and my chin. But it did manage to break my sternum and 4 ribs, broken wrist, cardiac and pulmonary contusion, a-fib, torn muscles in my back. Damn, that was a good car too. It only had 20,000 miles on it when I bought it.

    I went back to school after that, instead of going back to work. That's why I work with computers now instead of inmates. All because someone talked me into buying a minty '62 Torino for $500.
     
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  8. Boris Bubbanov

    Boris Bubbanov Member

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    I will not lie.

    When I was offered a case where working people were in a Body on Frame car that had been rear ended by a well insured driver, I would cancel my vacation and work that case as thoroughly as I could. Because I pretty much knew, these people might not bounce back, and that the case could end up being worth $ 300,000 or something.

    By pressing to make cars safer, we've pretty much put ourselves out of business. The numbers of cases of this nature you will see on the typical court docket in 2019, are way down.
     
    Last edited: Jul 19, 2019
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  9. TopJimmy5150

    TopJimmy5150 Member

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    Those 2 tons of Detroit steel did a lot more to protect the 2 tons of Detroit steel than it did to protect the occupants. Cars today are designed with crumple zones to absorb the impact of a collision. Cars from the 70s....you were absorbing the impact.
     
  10. Boris Bubbanov

    Boris Bubbanov Member

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    Your Torino was probably a 1972 - there was no Torino in 1962.

    Torinos were "great for business" as Sidney Vicious was saying. People couldn't seem to control them and they had a decided propensity for being in wrecks - compared to some other cars.

    I mean no offense, but I am going to offer you the suggestion that, with a modern, easier to drive automobile, you wouldn't have hit anything at all.

    Before I graduated from law school and started my practice, I "studied the street" by running lots and garages in the French Quarter and I got to drive every vehicle they had up to 1978. And these Torinos, while obviously smaller than an Olds Toronado or Lincoln Town Car, were notoriously indifferent to steering and braking input. And some SOB in a big bumper Torino hit and ran my '72 Demon while parked mostly on my lawn - accidentally, I'm sure. I think your treasured memories of this car are over the top.
     
    Last edited: Jul 19, 2019
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  11. spunky

    spunky Member

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    Yes...I do not think that you are wrong....I understand the crumple zones and today's safety technology...but I also think that having a chrome bumper, elongated front end, and real steel, saved a lot of peoples butts from serious injuries. The cars were not perfect, by a long shot...the dashboards were not padded....no air bags...etc...but I'm thinking that in a high speed crash, the more steel and front end, and side panels.... you have the better off you are.
     
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  12. spunky

    spunky Member

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    You do make a good point here. Today's cars handle, and brake, so much better then cars from the 70's that it would indeed be very possible to avoid many of the crashes of yore....especially the ones involving the 70's muscle cars.
     
  13. MrSteve

    MrSteve Member

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    I know 2 guys who have that car. Well the one guy has a 72 and the other a 73. Both cars are white like the one pictures.
     
  14. MrSteve

    MrSteve Member

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    With half of that pushing towards you in a crash due to lack of crumple zones.
     
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  15. Ramboorider

    Ramboorider Member

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    At the time, none of us saw a problem with ANY of that, but with the benefit of hindsight, I'd say the only unmitigated GOOD thing on that list is "Rollerskating tube top/wideleg jean wearing hotchicks". Those jeans were tight where it mattered.

    Other than that, the first two helped bring us global warming, the next FOUR (excluding the aforementioned hotchicks) got a lot of people killed and/or maimed. The next one was a matter of taste, but I liked em all a LOT more then than I do now... And the last one, again with killing a lot of people...
     
  16. 84superchamp

    84superchamp Silver Supporting Member

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    My 1st thought: where's Ricardo when you need him?
     
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  17. Baxtercat

    Baxtercat Member

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    Kind of like an off-the-shelf Strat--you have to mod them.

    [​IMG]
     
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  18. mango

    mango Member

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    Hahaha..my first car was a '75 Cordoba ,like this with white vinyl on the roof.Got in '80 maybe
    Sadly no leather,cloth interior,looked kinda like a mexican blanket.
    400 4-barrel.
    [​IMG]
     
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  19. Timcito

    Timcito Member

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    The huge phallic bonnet (whoops, I mean 'hood'!) bespeaks a swagger, an unblinking self-confidence, if you will. Contrast that with some of the pug-nosed, apologetic, runty little vehicles currently being touted. Whatever happened?!
     
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  20. Echo Are

    Echo Are Member

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    I remember all of those in the cars in the OP. Man, those Ford LTDs were in so many crime-drama TV shows back then.
     
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