• New Sponsor: ShipNerd, Ship Your Gear with Us... for less! Click Here.

Performing with Mediocre Vocals vs Instrumentals

Based on this sample I would choose

  • Vocals

  • Instrumental

  • Other (respond below)


Results are only viewable after voting.

shawntp

Member
Messages
1,808
I play guitar with another guy (sometimes a conga player) at some local coffee shops, a small brewery tasting room, and sometime other small spaces. We struggle with vocals, the other guy is worse than I am vocally. I have come up with some decent instrumentals with melodic leads, we write lyrics to and work on songwriting but I feel like things are easier for us instrumentally (and sometimes I feel like lyrics and singing are a burden where my voice can't translate the emotion I want that my fingers can). I know people like to hear vocals and instrumentals are basically background music but I dont really care either way, I just like playing.
Here is a quick sloppy rendition of Tears In Heaven to give an example of my point. One pass with vocals and the second as instrumental. This was just a quick capture on my iPad with a Apogee Mic.

[SOUNDCLOUD]http://soundcloud.com/shawnparslow/tears-in-heaven-test[/SOUNDCLOUD]
 

Julia343

Member
Messages
7,610
Your singing melodically is okay. It's your vocal timing that is off. I'd simplify your guitar playing while you're singing to something more chunky rhythmically and save the fancier stuff for the stuff in between verses. It's hard to play intricately and sing at the same time. Forget the fills and stuff and your vocal timing will get better.

When I'm doing it on the piano I'm just playing very very basic chords and I can play my ass off otherwise.

Some people are good at multitasking this stuff others are not.
 
Messages
1,440
I think your voice is MORE than passable and I think if you took lessons you could do quite well. Your vocal quality is actually good and that right there is sometimes rare.

I agree with the above post...you may just need to practice a LOT singing and playing what you want simultaneously to achieve what you desire.

I think you're better off singing if you want to attract attention but if you're just background music and you like doing leads instead of vocals then do that.
 

GulfportBound

Member
Messages
8,741
I keep hoping the next blues group I put together will include players who also have good, solid singing to bring. I got pushed into singing with my last blues group because nobody else wanted to sing, and I know I'm not even close to the best blues singer around. I can handle something if it's to my natural range (baritone-leaning-bass) but I'd really rather play my guitar and write the songs (and pray the next band isn't chickensh@t about trying original material, as my last one was) and let someone else in the band (I'd like another quartet setup: keyboards, bass, drums) do the singing.
 

Funky54

Member
Messages
4,898
I think they gave you good advice, simplify while singing, work a little on pitch and timing. I think it was decent. Besides if the stones can get this big and sing that horrific, we already know a voice doesn't have to be perfect to be enjoyed.
 

Thinline_slim

Member
Messages
3,293
Your singing melodically is okay. It's your vocal timing that is off. I'd simplify your guitar playing while you're singing to something more chunky rhythmically and save the fancier stuff for the stuff in between verses. It's hard to play intricately and sing at the same time. Forget the fills and stuff and your vocal timing will get better.

When I'm doing it on the piano I'm just playing very very basic chords and I can play my ass off otherwise.

Some people are good at multitasking this stuff others are not.
^^ I agree completely except I can't play piano. :messedup

I was a singer first and then I started playing guitar. Now hold on, I wasn't that guy, I had sang all my life and had my choice between being a vocal major or bassoon major in college. Singing was easier. :rotflmao

Anyway, I learned quickly that there is one simple fact when playing guitar and singing at the same time, for most of us, that one aspect HAS to be practiced to the point that it goes on auto-pilot. If I want more feeling in the vocals, I bust my arse on the guitar to get it where it needs to be that I don't have to think about it. If it's a complicated run, I work the vocals (AND have the lyrics memorized! If you really want to screw yourself up, be the lead vocalist, guitar player and READ all at the same time.). Doing both at the same time just isn't an option for most of humanity.
 

taco-man

Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
3,309
You could bring in a professional-ish singer and compensate them by hugging/high-fiving them up-and-down.
 

fjblair

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
14,519
Do both. The singing is okay really and the instrumentals will take the spotlight off of the vocal for every tune.
 

shawntp

Member
Messages
1,808
Do both. The singing is okay really and the instrumentals will take the spotlight off of the vocal for every tune.
I might take a few vocal lessons and see if I can make improvements and do just this. Just do a little in between vocally and instrumentally to have arrangements that lighten the load. Find songs without a lot vocally.
 

Porrig

Member
Messages
3,830
As said already, it just sounds as you need to work some on your timing and pitch. You have a nice voice.
 

Pax

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
3,681
Your singing melodically is okay. It's your vocal timing that is off. I'd simplify your guitar playing while you're singing to something more chunky rhythmically and save the fancier stuff for the stuff in between verses. It's hard to play intricately and sing at the same time. Forget the fills and stuff and your vocal timing will get better.

When I'm doing it on the piano I'm just playing very very basic chords and I can play my ass off otherwise.

Some people are good at multitasking this stuff others are not.
This really is your answer.
 






Trending Topics

Top Bottom