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Perhaps a naive question about reverb and delay

Tarmac

Senior Member
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1,045
Recording, playing live and playing in your room; do these three environments mean changing the mix/levels? :huh

Is playing live a totally different deal when using reverb? or can you leave your settings pretty much the same as when your just jamming at home/
 
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6,841
I leave reverb pretty much the same, unless a very specific need, say "surf rock" comes along.

It really depends on the band/mix. Too much delay or reverb on a crowded stage kills "tightness" in a band especially if the delay repeats are fighting with a tight rhythm section, but when you're the only player, its kinda up to you to figure out the right feel/balance for the moment/song/gig.

Edit: NOT a naive question. Too many guitarists don't understand how to adapt, or they just don't want to.
 
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78deluxe

Member
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5,355
Recording, playing live and playing in your room; do these three environments mean changing the mix/levels? :huh
For the way I play, yes, all 3 environments will dictate some tweaking to Effect levels as well as decay times on my reverbs, same goes for delay too.

Agree, not a naive question. Many people don't understand the environment when working with these time based elements that can also create a perceived space as well.
 

fr8_trane

Silver Supporting Member
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7,100
If your playing in a really reflective environment with lots of uncovered cement, wood or glass (gymnasium anyone?) then reverb is redundant and can be turned off or you risk being completely washed out. In places like that delay is your best bet for added ambience.

In a dry room with lots of soft surfaces and a ton of people you may need to turn your reverb and delay mix up to compensate.
 

Tarmac

Senior Member
Messages
1,045
Thanks for the responses guys. I did have a hunch it'd be the case about tweaking.
 

Madsen

Member
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8,980
If your playing in a really reflective environment with lots of uncovered cement, wood or glass (gymnasium anyone?) then reverb is redundant and can be turned off or you risk being completely washed out. In places like that delay is your best bet for added ambience.

In a dry room with lots of soft surfaces and a ton of people you may need to turn your reverb and delay mix up to compensate.
:agree
typically the larger & more "reflective" the room, the more i'll dial back those effects, as the room will be providing it's own natural reverb & echo. the usual purpose of those effects is to emulate a fictionally larger space.

no need to CGI a ravine & cliffs when you're filming in a lovely canyon.
 






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