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Pettydrive v2 or Pettydrive Deluxe

65pr

Member
Messages
16
I know the deluxe has the special opamp chip, but the v2 looks like it has a wider range of frequencies it can dial in? Does the v2 have the higher gain mods standard? Just curious if anybody has any experience with both and can give me your two cents. Thanks.
 

galibier_un

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
2,067
I quoted the entirety of Stephen's response below - from this thread: https://www.thegearpage.net/board/i...ive-standard-or-deluxe.1608627/#post-20463940.

The V2 comes with the OPA2134 installed in the Iron side, and there's a dummy socket which holds an optional JRC4558.

I just popped the lid on my V2 and I see an OPA134 chip on the Chime side.

IOW, where a standard vs. Deluxe choice may have been relevant to the V1, I don't believe this differentiation applies to the V2.

I can't speak to the higher gain mod.

Hi ToneGrinder and others!

Stephen Pettyjohn here from Pettyjohn Electronics. Sorry, I checked through our emails and unfortunately nothing came through. A good email is info@pettyjohnelectronics.com for anyone who has questions! Now down to attempting to answer some questions:

There are 3 chips that are different between the Deluxe and Standard model. Besides the knobs they are completely the same otherwise.

A) Iron Side Burrs Browns vs JRC4558: The Deluxe has 2 Burr Brown OPA2134 chips in the Iron side while the Standard has authentic JRC4558s. (Bare with me as describing tone with words is a bit ambiguous at times!) The resulting tone difference is the Deluxe is a bit more detailed with a more "modern" sound vs the classic clipping nature of the 4558's that has a smoother top and slightly thicker lows and mids for a more gooey "vintage" tone. Also, the Burr Browns chips are quieter then the 4558s for less background noise, although I wouldn't call the 4558's "noisy", it's a very quiet drive pedal overall.

B) The Input buffer of the Deluxe is equipped with a discrete opamp derived from the PreDrive's buffer. Everyone at the shop agrees that it adds a bit of extra "magic", sensitivity, openness and musicality over the Standard. Due to the high cost of the Discrete opamps I searched hard for a less expensive chip that could credibly fill it's place in the standard version. I settled on a Burr Browns OPA134 chip, which, out of every chip I tried got closest to the clarity of the Discrete Opamp. Its still a very nice chip and expensive compared to whats in most pedals these days. I felt like it made for a pedal I still completely enjoy playing.

Just FYI, if you price check the Burr Browns chips we are using they are MUCH more then 15c a chip ;-)

Now to address another comment... The term studio-grade is not meant to be a meaningless piece of marketing jargon, even though I can understand why it may come across that way. I am a studio engineer by trade and have made my full time living as an audio engineer for the past 12 years and been mainly a post engineer doing analog mixing and mastering for the past 4 years. I am use to listening to analog gear that costs $1-4K per unit and I must admit there is something disappointing to me when I plug into most pedals these days. High end studio gear always adds depth, musicality and clarity to my signal while I find most pedals add a flat, squashed 2-D type of sound when I engage them. Not un-usable but often leaving something to be desired in the inspiration department. I also find that while mixing and mastering guitar based music there are often problem areas that need alot of eq and compression to "fix" them. In designing these pedals, my goal was to use the same level of components that are in my VERY expensive studio gear while voicing the circuits to create tones that sound much closer to what finished albums sound like after Im done with post. I audition many types of high end components and voice the circuits for overall balance in my fully treated, acoustically balanced Mastering studio, which allows me really focus on smooth, sweet, deep tone thats feels great to play, mics well and translates through a sound system or recording with minimal corrective EQ.

IMHO, it could be that in many cases the chips uses don't make a huge difference because the components around them are actually coloring the sound more then the chips do. Also, just swapping chips may introduce the chip to an operating condition its not optimized for. In my circuits I spend much time and money on high-end parts that allow the details of different chips to come through more clearly. And optimize each stage individually, down to listening to every cap, to try to deliver a more touch sensitive, organic tone.

In general, I like amp overdrive but don't like most overdrive pedals. My goal with the pettydrive was to create two circuits that stack extremely well and add light amounts of grit and saturation without compromising the feel or depth of the guitar. For me, this pedal kicked every other drive pedal off my board and together with my Pettydrive I can get almost any drive tone I could ever want.

A side note: the standard does fine on 9Vs but the Deluxe, due to the discrete opamp, really prefers 12V or 15V to have studio quiet operation... it will still work fine on most 9V adaptors with a hair bit more noise, like slightly below the normal noise of a single coil pickup.


Hope that helps a little!

Stephen Pettyjohn
Cheers,
Thom
 
Last edited:
Messages
240
I quoted the entirety of Stephen's response below - from this thread: https://www.thegearpage.net/board/i...ive-standard-or-deluxe.1608627/#post-20463940.

The V2 comes with the OPA2134 installed in the Iron side, and there's a dummy socket which holds an optional JRC4558.

I just popped the lid on my V2 and I see an OPA134 chip on the Chime side.

IOW, where a standard vs. Deluxe choice may have been relevant to the V1, I don't believe this differentiation applies to the V2.

I can't speak to the higher gain mod.



Cheers,
Thom
Correct on the dummy chip holder! There is a video on our channel that I walk through the chip swap procedure, its the same for the V2! Thom, correct both sides have OPA134 Input buffers! The Chip that gets swapped out is the 2134 on the Iron side that is the gain stage!

Thanks!
Stephen Pettyjohn
 

Modulator

Member
Messages
2,731
Are there any comparison demos of the two chips online? I have the Pettydrive V2 and am curious about the differences between chips, but it's hard to compare since I can't hear both at the same time.
BTW, I love the Pettydrive V2, it's on my main board, Chime side set to a slight dirty boost, Empress phaser and CB Warped Vinyl in the loop, Iron side set to a medium to high gain. Sounds obscene and my mom would hate how it sound (i.e. it sounds pretty awesome) once I turn on the fuzz before the PD.
 

galibier_un

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
2,067
Thanks Stephen! Having played "straight-in" for so many years, I dipped my toe into the world of boosts and overdrives this past Spring.

I have to say that this journey really had me scratching my head - especially over the highly regarded pedals I ended up buying and selling - getting nowhere near the expected results. Some of this was no doubt a function of my learning how they interact with my amp (Vintage Sound 20 - a Princeton Reverb circuit with beefier output transformer), as well as refining my touch sensitivity.

Still, I got the feeling that all of the stoke I was reading about was a case of "the emperor's new clothes". Lots of money down the drain and selling on the Emporium - nothing new for folks on this forum. I won't name the guilty, because I suspect many of these products are very good when used in the right context, but still, I was puzzled as to why they didn't work with a basic Blackface circuit.

My "rejects" were either extremely finicky in dialing in a sweet spot, or there was no sweet spot to be found. Many were "buzzy". If I was able to dial in a base tone, most were lacking in note articulation and touch sensitivity/dynamics, in spite of the multiple comments stating that these pedals responded dynamically like another stage of your amplifier.

Until I tried the Pettydrive, the only pedals I could bond with were the RC Booster, the Timmy, and a Kingsley Minstrel. The Pettydrive has easily found its way into this "elite" group. All four of these pedals have a wide sweep of sweet spots and tonal options. I'm finally exploring the harmonic textures I expected to do.

Careful readers of this forum will note that I bought and subsequently sold the Kingsley Minstrel. This was more of a gear reorganization move to fund the purchase of a Digitec Trio +. I need to get better at staying in the pocket - good tone does you no good if you have no rhythm.

I had no intention of replacing the Minstrel so soon, but a used Pettydrive appeared within an hours' drive from me, and being sick and tired of buying and selling my disappointments, I decided to check it out.

I would say to those considering the very fine Kingsley pedals, that you add the Pettyjohn products to a very short list. The fact that it's easier to power is certainly a bonus.

Obviously, I can't predict which one you'll prefer, but I suspect that it will be a difficult choice. They're both that good.

Great work, and I'm excited about trying more of your gear, and now that I have an experience of your design sensibilities, I have no problem with purchasing new Pettyjohn products. The Predrive is definitely tickling my curiosity.

Cheers,
Thom
 
Last edited:
Messages
240
Thanks Stephen! Having played "straight-in" for so many years, I dipped my toe into the world of boosts and overdrives this past Spring.

I have to say that this journey really had me scratching my head - especially over the highly regarded pedals I ended up buying and selling - getting nowhere near the expected results. Some of this was no doubt a function of my learning how they interact with my amp (Vintage Sound 20 - a Princeton Reverb circuit with beefier output transformer), as well as refining my touch sensitivity.

Still, I got the feeling that all of the stoke I was reading about was a case of "the emperor's new clothes". Lots of money down the drain and selling on the Emporium - nothing new for folks on this forum. I won't name the guilty, because I suspect many of these products are very good when used in the right context, but still, I was puzzled as to why they didn't work with a basic Blackface circuit.

My "rejects" were either extremely finicky in dialing in a sweet spot, or there was no sweet spot to be found. Many were "buzzy". If I was able to dial in a base tone, most were lacking in note articulation and touch sensitivity/dynamics, in spite of the multiple comments stating that these pedals responded dynamically like another stage of your amplifier.

Until I tried the Pettydrive, the only pedals I could bond with were the RC Booster, the Timmy, and a Kingsley Minstrel. The Pettydrive has easily found its way into this "elite" group. All four of these pedals have a wide sweep of sweet spots and tonal options. I'm finally exploring the harmonic textures I expected to do.

Careful readers of this forum will note that I bought and subsequently sold the Kingsley Minstrel. This was more of a gear reorganization move to fund the purchase of a Digitec Trio +. I need to get better at staying in the pocket - good tone does you no good if you have no rhythm.

I had no intention of replacing the Minstrel so soon, but a used Pettydrive appeared within an hours' drive from me, and being sick and tired of buying and selling my disappointments, I decided to check it out.

I would say to those considering the very fine Kingsley pedals, that you add the Pettyjohn products to a very short list. The fact that it's easier to power is certainly a bonus.

Obviously, I can't predict which one you'll prefer, but I suspect that it will be a difficult choice. They're both that good.

Great work, and I'm excited about trying more of your gear, and now that I have an experience of your design sensibilities, I have no problem with purchasing new Pettyjohn products. The Predrive is definitely tickling my curiosity.

Cheers,
Thom

Tom! Thanks for taking the time to share this! Appreciate it and Im stoked your enjoyng your PettyDrive!
Stephen
 
Messages
240
Are there any comparison demos of the two chips online? I have the Pettydrive V2 and am curious about the differences between chips, but it's hard to compare since I can't hear both at the same time.
BTW, I love the Pettydrive V2, it's on my main board, Chime side set to a slight dirty boost, Empress phaser and CB Warped Vinyl in the loop, Iron side set to a medium to high gain. Sounds obscene and my mom would hate how it sound (i.e. it sounds pretty awesome) once I turn on the fuzz before the PD.
Shnobel tone did a swap out video. Mainly just about 10% thicker/smoother tone. The OPA is what I prefer but sometimes if you have a fairly bright rig the 4558 can be a nice tamer of the "zing".


Cheers! Stephen
 






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