Playing pentatonic scale all over the neck exercise

oplatner

Member
Messages
303
Hi,

I want to practice playing the pentatonic scale all over the neck, but not playing at each position as whole but rather combining positions, let's say playing the scale on 2 strings on one position and moving on to the next position. Can't seem to find any tabs on google for this kind of practice, anyone here can help ?
 

lifeinsong

Member
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1,844
Check out "Fluid Pentatonics" by Tim Quinn(Mel Bay Publication)...really great book that'll get you playing pentatonic scales all over the neck and teaches you how to tie different patterns together. There are a few other books in the series that are equally as good...Fluid Arpeggios and Chord-Lead Soloing for Guitar(Hendrix style).
 

monty

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25,363
see if you can find some Richard Lloyd articles on the Guitar World page. He had a couple of great lessons on this very thing that I found very useful.
 

Dajbro

Member
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2,140
Do you know the notes of the guitar neck? If not, it would really help if you did.

A minor pentatonic = A C D E G (Just starting with that Am pent randomly. If you prefer to begin with another, go for it). If it helps you, print out a blank fingerboard diagram and map out where all these notes are on the neck.

Play those notes up & down the first string

Play those notes up & down the second string

Play those notes up & down the third string

Play those notes up & down the fourth string

Play those notes up & down the fifth string

Play those notes up & down the sixth string

When playing up and down the single strings you can play from A to A and it is also good to start on the lowest note in the scale that's on the string and play up and down the entire length of the string. On strings 1 & 6 you'd start on the open E; string 2 start on C (1st fret); 3rd string start on open G; 4th string start on open D; 5th string start on open A.

After you've done that, you should have a much easier time seeing the scale all over the neck and not being trapped in one position.
 
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scotth

Member
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1,494
I just memorized each position and the roots very well. When I switch from positon to position I just tell myself, for example, "now I'm in position two" or "I'm in two, lets go to four".

The way I learned the major and minor scale positions all over the neck was by playing in one position and learning the sound of intervals. Now I can instinctively play major and minor up and down the neck on 1 string, 2 strings, 3 strings etc. I figured this out farther into my musical journey, and believe it to be a superior method to my approach with the pentatonics.
 

Silver

Member
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2,496
Um well, ok, how 'bout three notes per string pentatonic..go....

This. Can be a bit stretchy with the standard Pent, tho', ime. I seem to remember that in the (for me) pre-web, guitar mag days, it being attributed to Zakk Wylde a lot. That may help refine your searches? Stuff like this.
 

PatrickE_FenderADV

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
29,736
OP... The back of one pent box connects with the front of another box and so on. As you look at the five shapes, you can go up and down the neck in any major or minor pent key once you realize that you can play four or five pent notes on one string connecting those boxes (see the beginning of the Phil X/Marty video above). Once I learned this, the neck completely opened up to me and I got away from soloing in one neck position.
 

Kyle B

Member
Messages
5,290
I want to practice playing the pentatonic scale all over the neck, but .... Can't seem to find any tabs on google for this kind of practice, anyone here can help ?

Draw them out yourself. It's NOT hard, and it'll be WAY more effective for 'getting it into your brain' than looking at what someone else has done.
 

Clifford-D

Member
Messages
17,045
Um well, ok, how 'bout three notes per string pentatonic..go....
Jack Zucker's book Sheets of Sound has some great studies on three note per string pents. Add the string crossing and wide stretches and it breaks you away from position playing.

I really like Jacks book, and if you're into Gambale, Holdsworth and Shawn Lane styles, it's a goldmine.
 




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