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Playing triplet sequences in groups of 4

dead of night

Member
Messages
2,650
Hi, I'm experimenting with playing triplet sequences in groups of 4. In other words, playing a 3 note sequence in 8th note patterns.

However, this gets very confusing and it is easy to lose myself, not knowing where to start next. I even have to stop after two patterns, confused and discombobulated.

Can you offer any tips and suggestions about how to keep the patterns and sequences straight? I find this technique offers riches and new patterns I've never played before even within the confines of a simple, pentatonic scale.
 

guitarjazz

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
22,191
Hi, I'm experimenting with playing triplet sequences in groups of 4. In other words, playing a 3 note sequence in 8th note patterns.

However, this gets very confusing and it is easy to lose myself, not knowing where to start next. I even have to stop after two patterns, confused and discombobulated.

Can you offer any tips and suggestions about how to keep the patterns and sequences straight? I find this technique offers riches and new patterns I've never played before even within the confines of a simple, pentatonic scale.
A Dr. Beat can be helpful 'cause it has subdivisions.
 

handtrix

Member
Messages
2,353
video ^^^ Eddie Van Halen 101
__________________________

Hi, I'm experimenting with playing triplet sequences in groups of 4. In other words, playing a 3 note sequence in 8th note patterns.

However, this gets very confusing and it is easy to lose myself, not knowing where to start next. I even have to stop after two patterns, confused and discombobulated.

Can you offer any tips and suggestions about how to keep the patterns and sequences straight? I find this technique offers riches and new patterns I've never played before even within the confines of a simple, pentatonic scale.
How about thinking triplets simply in up & down sets. Physically conscious of the downstroke set of triplets, then the upstroke set. - dud udu dud udu. Or down-2-3 up-2-3 down-2-3 up-2-3......
Putting a rhythmical sense to it might help in syncopation.
To build coordination, and as an even number, you could try sextuplets which might be easier for long practice runs. You still accomplish triplet feel.
123 123 123 123 becomes 123/456 123/456...
 

guitarjazz

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
22,191
I think he means duple 8ths w every third note accented. Technically not triplets but does achieve a polyrhythmic effect.
 

dead of night

Member
Messages
2,650
Do you mean the typical playing 3 against 4, or quarter note triplets in 4/4 time?
3 against 4. In other words, the first set would be a descending triplet sequence, plus the first note of the second triplet sequence, played as 4 8th notes.
 

StevenA

Senior Member
Messages
3,976
I believe the rock pentatonic universe utilizes these triplet patterns. After getting use to this, try patterns of 5 and 7
 

guitarjazz

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
22,191
I think six different rhythmic constructs have been brought out in an attempt to stab the meaning of the original post.
 

DNW

Member
Messages
466
Still not 100% on what you're doing, but I gather the word "triplet" doesn't really belong. What you're actually wanting to do is play three note groupings in straight 8ths (or 16ths), yes?

So if you were going up a G major scale, the sequence might be: GAB, ABC, BCD, CDE, DEF#, EF#G, etc.
But rather than playing it as triplets, playing: GABA, BCBC, DCDE, DEF#E, F#G, etc.

If that's what you're doing, all I would suggest is playing it slow to a metronome, and using picking accents to give a better feel for where you are in the sequence. If you're getting stuck, go slower, give yourself the time for your brain and hands to get a hang of it. Once you get it you can start speeding it back up.


If you are actually talking about triplets... then I still don't understand what you're trying to do. :red
 

dead of night

Member
Messages
2,650
Still not 100% on what you're doing, but I gather the word "triplet" doesn't really belong. What you're actually wanting to do is play three note groupings in straight 8ths (or 16ths), yes?

So if you were going up a G major scale, the sequence might be: GAB, ABC, BCD, CDE, DEF#, EF#G, etc.
But rather than playing it as triplets, playing: GABA, BCBC, DCDE, DEF#E, F#G, etc.

If that's what you're doing, all I would suggest is playing it slow to a metronome, and using picking accents to give a better feel for where you are in the sequence. If you're getting stuck, go slower, give yourself the time for your brain and hands to get a hang of it. Once you get it you can start speeding it back up.


If you are actually talking about triplets... then I still don't understand what you're trying to do. :red
Yes, this is exactly what I mean, playing three note groupings in straight 8ths, or 16ths. It's tough, mentally, but it will result in note patterns not usually played.
 

JonR

Member
Messages
15,069
Yes, this is exactly what I mean, playing three note groupings in straight 8ths, or 16ths. It's tough, mentally, but it will result in note patterns not usually played.
Seems you're talking about what's commonly known as "melodic patterns":
http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/less...e_melodic_patterns_for_guitar_-_lesson_1.html
http://www.justinguitar.com/en/IM-136-BuildingMelodicPatterns.php
http://www.guitarhabits.com/6-basic-major-scale-sequences-melodic-patterns/

Your use of "triplets" is what was confusing. "Triplets" are groups of 3 played in the space of 2 - as Kiwi Joe laid out.
Melodic patterns are much more extensive than groups of 3 8ths, of course. Very powerful practice devices, as described in those links (and others).

As for your question - how to keep track of where you are (relative to beat and measure) - I suggest just starting slow. Play to a metronome, set to quarter-notes at first. Obviously make sure you're thoroughly familiar with the scale pattern and its fingering (playing up and down note by note in beginner fashion). Play the melodic pattern steadily all the way up (two octaves), and down. If you get lost - slow down a little and start again.

Where melodic patterns get really creative (and musical) is when you start varying the note durations. Eg, you'll naturally start with 8ths (or 16ths to be challenging), but once you're comfortable with a few patterns in 8ths, start changing note duration - eg (in a 3-note sequence) a quarter followed by two 8ths, 8th plus 2 16ths,etc. Randomise the durations (while keeping to the sequence). You'll discover lots of cool licks this way (or useful melodic motifs anyway).
 

guitarjazz

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
22,191
Seems you're talking about what's commonly known as "melodic patterns":
http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/less...e_melodic_patterns_for_guitar_-_lesson_1.html
http://www.justinguitar.com/en/IM-136-BuildingMelodicPatterns.php
http://www.guitarhabits.com/6-basic-major-scale-sequences-melodic-patterns/

Your use of "triplets" is what was confusing. "Triplets" are groups of 3 played in the space of 2 - as Kiwi Joe laid out.
Melodic patterns are much more extensive than groups of 3 8ths, of course. Very powerful practice devices, as described in those links (and others).

As for your question - how to keep track of where you are (relative to beat and measure) - I suggest just starting slow. Play to a metronome, set to quarter-notes at first. Obviously make sure you're thoroughly familiar with the scale pattern and its fingering (playing up and down note by note in beginner fashion). Play the melodic pattern steadily all the way up (two octaves), and down. If you get lost - slow down a little and start again.

Where melodic patterns get really creative (and musical) is when you start varying the note durations. Eg, you'll naturally start with 8ths (or 16ths to be challenging), but once you're comfortable with a few patterns in 8ths, start changing note duration - eg (in a 3-note sequence) a quarter followed by two 8ths, 8th plus 2 16ths,etc. Randomise the durations (while keeping to the sequence). You'll discover lots of cool licks this way (or useful melodic motifs anyway).
Are we back in the mood?
 

DNW

Member
Messages
466
Yes, this is exactly what I mean, playing three note groupings in straight 8ths, or 16ths. It's tough, mentally, but it will result in note patterns not usually played.
Well in that case, as I said, use a metronome, start slow, use accents. If you're still struggling, go slower. Give yourself time to think and keep track of what's going on. If it's just the stumbling on the pattern thing, but your technique is ok, you might even find that once you're past that bit of confusion and you can nail it at a slower speed, the problem is kinda out of the way and you can build the speed up pretty quickly.
 




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