Please Explain The Principle

Discussion in 'Amps/Cabs Tech Corner: Amplifier, Cab & Speakers' started by marty pollard, Feb 12, 2008.


  1. marty pollard

    marty pollard Member

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    What's happening when I am using: Realtube II preamp~>Behringer comp~>76 Twin Reverb.

    I found last weekend that when I had the TR input volume on about 7 and the master on 10 I was getting fantastic tone just by varying the output gain on the preamp and/or the compressor (but mostly the guitar volume knob).

    So basically the Twin was running almost wide open.

    Are there any negative ramifications to this?
    Is this the best order for the signal chain?
     
  2. Pedro58

    Pedro58 Supporting Member

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    No negative ramifications other than tube wear. A power tube wears out faster at higher volume as it is working harder. But that's what is going to happen anyway... You wouldn't expect strings on your guitar or tires on your car to last forever.

    As far as signal path goes, if you like the tone, then the signal path is correct. Are you "taming" the volume of the twin with the two input devices? That's what those devices were designed to do, along with the volume circuit in the guitar itself. It sounds to me like your getting a tone you like. Go with it.
     
  3. IIIBOOMERIII

    IIIBOOMERIII Member

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    I would run: Behringer comp~>Realtube II preamp~>76 Twin Reverb.

    Running the amp wide open is opening the door to alot of hiss and
    other noise. I dont think I would do that but to each his own. I
    dont remember if I was able to run the Twin as a slave by using
    the reverb in as a pre amp in. It has been a few years and the
    memory is a bit foggy on that one. Try it, see if it works if not go
    back to the way you were runing it.

    I am a big fan of the ADA MP-1 but hooking up a pre-amp is all the
    same. Whenever I tried to run the ADA thru another pre amp, be it
    a Fender or a Marshall amp, the sound suffered. It is always better
    to run into an effect loop in and use the amp as a slave or an even
    better solution is to use a tube power amp. Loves me some tube
    power amps....that is so 80's by today's standard, but it worked great!

    Good luck man!
     
  4. 5er Driver

    5er Driver Member

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    Sounds like you've found your tone. Pre-amp's dialed in, Amp's dialed in, Guitar's dialed in....I wouldn't change a thing. Power tubes are like tires. Low MV or slow speed, they'll last forever. High MV or fast speed (more fun) they wear quicker.
     
  5. Blue Strat

    Blue Strat Member

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    Where the controls on the amp are set has absolutely nothing to do with tube wear. How much power is being expended is what counts.

    For example, running an amp with all controls dimed and with no input signal puts no more wear on the tubes (or anything) than having all controls set to zero.

    Playing LOUDER causes wear.
     
  6. marty pollard

    marty pollard Member

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    Well the input signal is what's being manipulated.
    The amp pre and master sections are static (at a high potential volume setting).

    Can I overload or damage the amp pre section by injecting too hot a signal from my rack chain?

    And how does the power section 'perceive' the signal from the amp pre section? As if it were turned up to 7 (pretty hot) or as if it were at the level injected by the rack signal chain (pretty mild)?
     
  7. Blue Strat

    Blue Strat Member

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    The signal level being fed from the rack and guitar is all that counts.

    It's unlikely that you'll damage anything with too hot of an input signal, but at some point, you'll get clipping from the input stage and it won't sound very good.
     
  8. hasserl

    hasserl Member

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    I agree with Mike, you can't hurt the amp running too high a signal into it. You can cause clipping of the signal or even grid blocking, but it won't damage anything, it just won't sound very good.
     
  9. Pedro58

    Pedro58 Supporting Member

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    Mike's got it right. My answer is a bit off. If your preamp device is feeding a weak signal, the power section responds accordingly.
     

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