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Poco, what is it about them?

frankencat

Guitarded
Gold Supporting Member
Messages
13,401
Growing up I was always hearing my friends and band mates talk about them. They are/were talked about along with bands like Little Feat, Outlaws, Eagles etc like they were on the same lever or something. They are just way too sugary sweet for me and I never really got into them. I don't mean this to be a bashing thread so let's not go there. What am I missing about Poco and what makes them so great to many people?
Thanks -Frank
 

keefsdad

Member
Messages
2,210
Growing up I was always hearing my friends and band mates talk about them. They are/were talked about along with bands like Little Feat, Outlaws, Eagles etc like they were on the same lever or something. They are just way too sugary sweet for me and I never really got into them. I don't mean this to be a bashing thread so let's not go there. What am I missing about Poco and what makes them so great to many people?
Thanks -Frank
I'm a huge fan, but i know what you mean. What made them great to me was the fact that they were so incredibly tight, had great harmonies and wrote some musically great songs, and had a great pedal steel player in Rusty Young(I think he's the only original member now, if they are even still together). When I listen too them now, I find a lot of the lyrics pretty weak. They also had a lot of personnel changes, that IMHO impeded their progress at a certain point. To me, after "Good Feeling To Know", they became a different and more commercial band that didn't interest me nearly as much.
 

keefsdad

Member
Messages
2,210
One thing that always puzzled me is that "From the Inside" absolutely blew me away, and yet in interviews they themselves weren't really fond of it at all
 

Spoonful

Member
Messages
206
Well, at the time, Country and Western music was something totally different than it is today. Poco, Buffalo Springfield and the Flying Burrito Bros helped change all that. They were breaking new ground. Did it always work or stand the test of time? Sometimes. Plus there was some serious talent is these bands.
 

Brutus

Member
Messages
3,557
Heard them at Convention Hall in Asbury Park back in the day. There wasn't anything sugary about how they sounded when they kicked out the jams towards the end of their show. That was one of the best concert closing workouts I ever heard, and I was not a fan of theirs.
 

Rimbaud

Tarnished Silver
Messages
8,569
Heard them at Convention Hall in Asbury Park back in the day. There wasn't anything sugary about how they sounded when they kicked out the jams towards the end of their show. That was one of the best concert closing workouts I ever heard, and I was not a fan of theirs.
saw that concert too..amazing musicianship and voices like a choir of kick ass Angels..
OP..I think what sold me personally on the band was their intriguing harmony and vocal range and arrangement.
Don't get any better'n them.
Timothty B's vocals and bass and Rusty Youngs haunting steel pedal closed the deal.
 
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fenderball

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
3,591
saw them live a number of times '73-'74..great band, great live for sure...
first time i saw rusty young pick up his metal folding chair, stand up and use the chair as a slide on his pedal steel, my mind was blown!
 
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23,963
Frank, check out the first albums, the ones where Jimmy Messina is still there. I'm pretty sure you won't find those as sugary.

I didn't quit buying right away when he left and I never saw the Paul Cotton era as "sugary", I just realized in steps that the big magic was mostly gone.
 

Laurence

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
9,211
There's a direct connection between Byrds, Springfield, Poco, Burrito Bro's, Ronstadt, Browne, Loggins and Messina, Eagles (where things started to 'tilt' as it were). The Outlaws, Little Feat, etc. is a whole nutha thing. Not comparable in style or execution IMHO. Not talking better or worse, just different.

Now, if a person mentioned Poco in relation to the Ozrak Mountain Daredevils, then maybe we'd have a different conversation...

Big Poco fan from the beginning, but I feel as though Cantamos was the beginning of the end
 

swiveltung

Senior Member
Messages
14,485
Well, they are out of context now. At the time popular was Country Rock somewhat blended with CSNY. (think Eagles Desperado) Poco had superb vocals. And BTW, some Poco's became Eagles!
 

gem

Member
Messages
932
RLD has it right. That album with the oranges is fantastic. it has their great vocals but extended jams with great bass lines, guitar work, keys/organ etc. It is an album that never gets old. My son is a hardcore metal shredder and sometimes i hear him jamming that stuff. He loves that album. "Sagebrush Serenade" was a second runner up and then they got kinda shmaltzy, albeit very talented.
 

DustyRhodesJr

Member
Messages
11,960
I think I have every one of their albums up into the mid-eighties.

They hardly even put out a single album that wasnt really good- the
quality of their stuff has stood the test of time.

I actually prefer the Paul Cotton era the best.

It is always good to hear "Crazy Love" or "In The Heart Of The Night"
on the radio, two of their songs that still get airplay.
 

DrumBob

Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
18,755
I was a huge Poco fan, because I was a Buffalo Springfield/Richie Furay fan and still am. I began to lose interest after Richie left the band. I had a chance to hang out with them when they were doing the four piece band thing. Paul Cotton and George Grantham were nice guys. Tim Schmit wasn't, and Rusty was a bit strange. George was particularly nice to me, and is sadly unable to play anymore due to a debilitating stroke years ago.

Don't let the studio stuff fool you; as others said, they could jam hard and always did in concert. I remember seeing Rusty Young using a steel chair to attack the strings of his pedal steel in concert. I honestly thought he would smash it up, and he came close. The harmonies were always brilliant, and Richie Furay was such a positive force onstage, a great performer. He still is. Later on, Poco became extremely commercial with all that "Crazy Love/Heart Of The Night" balladry that I didn't care for.

Rusty Young still has a band called Poco, but they're basically a tribute band now. I have met and talked with Richie a number of times over the years, and he's a real gentleman.
 
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Rimbaud

Tarnished Silver
Messages
8,569
I played the hell out of this way back when.
funny..I remember the band was all gravitating to the 'countrified' look and Messina was still all Brit/Beau Brummel-ly lookin'
Speakin' of 'in..my bro pointed once out that some many of their songs always dropped the 'g' from 'ing' word endings.
'and settlin' down'
'good feelin' to know' etc.
 
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gmann

Member
Messages
8,825
I played the hell out of this way back when.
This LP was my introduction to them. Fantastic! I listen to it still and it's the one I play 1st when anybody asks me about POCO. When Ritchie was still in the band they were the best, nothing sugary about it. Should have been bigger.
 

gmann

Member
Messages
8,825
One thing that always puzzled me is that "From the Inside" absolutely blew me away, and yet in interviews they themselves weren't really fond of it at all
Great LP, one of my favorites! I also get the feelin' they weren't too fond of it. Produced by Steve Cropper too!
 






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