Poll: What kind of amps do the younger-ish crowd use here?

You're under forty years of age and you mostly play...

  • High gain metal amps

    Votes: 33 18.0%
  • Mid gain amps (for hard rock and alternative to fusion)

    Votes: 52 28.4%
  • Low gain or edge of breakup amps (from blues to pop to light alternative)

    Votes: 42 23.0%
  • Cheesy Dumble-style amps :P

    Votes: 9 4.9%
  • Clean amps with some effects

    Votes: 27 14.8%
  • Clean amps soaked with effects

    Votes: 12 6.6%
  • Clean amps all the way

    Votes: 8 4.4%

  • Total voters
    183
  • Poll closed .

somedude

Member
Messages
8,069
That's really interesting. Does it speak to the style of music your friends are into, or the style of instruments they prefer? Strats seem to have fallen afoul of trends (visually, at least) more so than Les Pauls (which tend to have cache across all types of music).

It might also be that your friends think Strat = quack, or Strat = thin - which is a pretty common public misunderstanding in my experience (albeit one perhaps fueled by those players who really do pursue a more traditional Strat --> clean Fender amp tone).

I think it’s more fueled by what happens when you take a Strat, plug it into the insane gain setting on whatever device you’re using, then flick to the bridge single coil and try to pound out some heavy, palm muted riffs.
 

Guitar Dave T

Member
Messages
11,404
I'm in my late 20s and have been using cranked Fender blackface amps for most of my guitarist life. I started out with a Deluxe Reverb and upgraded to a Super Reverb, which I just deeply love. The Deluxe Reverb has been converted to a head and gets used most of the time to power a Leslie cabinet.

As soon as I start a thread on TGP asking for a 2lb solid state alternative because I can't carry that Super Reverb anymore I'll just quit playing.

You make us old guys proud. Keep on keepin' on, you're on the right track.
 

Prince

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
1,965
I'm 31 years old.
ME = Wooly Coats Spanky MKII and have recently owned a 65 PRRI and Vox AC4HW1.
Friends = Fender & Vox camps, one buddy rocks a Mark IV, and a few others (myself included) are into modelers, primarily Line 6 Helix.
Guitars = Strats, Teles, Mustangs, Jaguars, ES-...all mainly single coils or P90s.
Pedals = pedals, lots of pedals
Music = Jam band, electronic, "Indie Rock"
 

Trickyrick85

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
13
33 year old here, I rock a boogie mark IVb widebody. I bought it shortly after high school and spent, what still remains to me, a small fortune. Over the years I've learned to keep her reigned in, for as a youth she proved much for an inexperienced lad to handle. Now we get on famously and she continues to astound me with the breadth of her tonality. I've considered other lighter and lower wattage options that I may someday explore, but it has been made explicit to me that due to our "spacial limitations" it would behoove me to not make any unsanctioned purchases. God help me... anyway I couldn't see myself selling the mark iv to make room for anything else at this point.
 

bucketsofcake

Member
Messages
302
Everyone in my age group wanted the amps they used to make, and when they finally started making them they put them out at a price no one could afford, and those that could afford them could also afford boutique.

In the meantime Orange (and a bunch of other companies... Bogner, Splawn, etc) filled the gap for a Modern, British style amp. I don’t think the long term effect of the Tiny Terror as an entry level tube amp can be overstated. I think that if your first experience with a companies entry level products is positive then you’re more likely to continue with that company as you work your way up, and IMO Orange nailed it with that amp.

Excellent point. Brand attachment is very real. I think this is one among many of the reasons Gibson has also struggled so much of late. If you price your gear out of reach of the young, odds are they're less likely to reach for it when they're old.

Orange has done a brilliant job marketing to the doom and thrash kids Marshall ignored in quest of the Boomer dollar. The Tiny Terror is the metal equivalent of the Blues Jr.
 
Messages
1,385
27. EVH 5153.

I am probably the youngest person here by far.

Not quite! Also 27 :D hi-five.

Mid-gained amps for me, specifically an Orange Dual Terror and a Bassbreaker 45. Set crunching but not super-saturated, then cleans come from the volume knob. I run pedals in front as neither amp has an FX loop; my primary PT Nano is just OD, delay and a tuner. Works for me so far.
 

Jay Axis

Member
Messages
641
I’m 43 and I pretty much like them all. Older, lower gain 1959SLP to JCM800s, up to Soldano SLO, Suhr SE-100, hot rodded Ceriatone Chupacabra, and so on. I also love boost pedals, OD pedals, various effects pedals, high end rack effects, Strats, Les Pauls, my own home built guitars, etc. You name it, and I probably like it for something!
 

BarArt

Senior Member
Messages
159
Orange has done a brilliant job marketing to the doom and thrash kids
Oranges amps all have this characteristic slightly fuzzy low-end to their distortion. Which makes sense for Doom, but not for Thrash (at least the traditional Thrash I'm thinking of). I personally never got along with any Orange amps because of that.
 

somedude

Member
Messages
8,069
Orange has done a brilliant job marketing to the doom and thrash kids Marshall ignored in quest of the Boomer dollar. The Tiny Terror is the metal equivalent of the Blues Jr.

I never really thought of the Tiny Terror as a Blues Jr for metal heads, but I think you hit the nail on the head.
 

somedude

Member
Messages
8,069
Oranges amps all have this characteristic slightly fuzzy low-end to their distortion. Which makes sense for Doom, but not for Thrash (at least the traditional Thrash I'm thinking of). I personally never got along with any Orange amps because of that.

When they came out they were known for sounding great in the store and struggling to cut live. Thrash and Hardcore guys didn’t like them because they were too fuzzy, and the Doom guys didn’t like them because they didn’t sound like an OR-120. I think they found a niche with the alt rock and sludge crowds, particularly when they reduced the gain and released the Thunder series of heads.
 

Jecht

Member
Messages
1,625
I'm 28 and I play the 50 watt 5150III 2.0 head with the concentric volume and gain pots. I need to have everything from pristine cleans to full on distortion and that amp allows me to do just that. I love my affordable Jet City head too and I'm probably going to grab an Amelia at some point for the same purposes. Single channel heads are great, but the volume drop from rolling back the volume knob and the slightly dirty cleans won't work for the music I play, at least in a live setting. For recording, bring out the single channel heads. :)

I'm also starting to save up for my first high end boutique head and I'm really intrigued by the new SLO 30 in development.
 
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bluesoul

Member
Messages
4,646
None of the above. All guitars parts can be done on a computer without the need for an amp or a guitar. Dah, get a clue old dudes!
 

Burt-Reynolds

Member
Messages
119
35, I voted mid gain. I go back and forth between either my Mesa express 5:50+ or my Mark V35. The express isn't as high gain as the V35, but I love the cleans it has and I usual boost it with an OCD if I feel I need a little more juice.
 

bucketsofcake

Member
Messages
302
I never really thought of the Tiny Terror as a Blues Jr for metal heads, but I think you hit the nail on the head.

It's the amp you buy when the amp you want costs a grand more than your student budget can afford. Both are phenomenal values.


Oranges amps all have this characteristic slightly fuzzy low-end to their distortion. Which makes sense for Doom, but not for Thrash (at least the traditional Thrash I'm thinking of). I personally never got along with any Orange amps because of that.

I guess it's tough to define modern thrash according to the increasingly blurred sub-genre lines of metal, but you're right, most of my thrash friends like Mesa not Orange. Is Mastodon post-thrash? alt-metal? new heavy metal? third wave prog-metal? I'm not really sure.
 
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BarArt

Senior Member
Messages
159
Is Mastodon post-thrash? alt-metal? new heavy metal? third wave prog-metal? I'm not really sure.
Depends on what albums you're talking about. All albums including Crack The Skye and before were more Prog-metal with a dash of Thrash. All albums afterwards were still Prog-metal, but with a more mainstream Heavy Metal influence. Also, their early albums were vintage Marshall amps. For example, Blood Mountain was a JMP and an 800.
 

bucketsofcake

Member
Messages
302
Depends on what albums you're talking about. All albums including Crack The Skye and before were more Prog-metal with a dash of Thrash. All albums afterwards were still Prog-metal, but with a more mainstream Heavy Metal influence. Also, their early albums were vintage Marshall amps. For example, Blood Mountain was a JMP and an 800.

Prog-metal with a dash of thrash is a solid description. I'm not going to pretend to be a real metalhead capable of parsing the distinctions. My friends often rag on me for only liking "hipster metal." As far as Mastodon goes, I really loved everything until Crack The Skye, but have been totally lukewarm to everything after, except Cold Dark Place, which I adore.

Which Mesa amp? I wouldn't imagine a Rectifier. That tone is more old school or 90's Death Metal, to me. Or just that generic 90's metal tone.

My friends are super old school. Basically, if Metallica used it, they're into it. Mostly Marks.
 




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