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Rex Anderson

Member
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5,068
Too bad we don't have a 2020 market replacement (with commensurate audiophile demand ala the 80's and 90's) for the excellence and accuracy the Dunlavy speakers offered. The SC-5's were and still are terrific speakers. John Dunlavy is missed by many that new him and or owned his speakers. The basic designs for his later USA built Dunlavy series stemmed from the research and manufacturing he had done in the early 1980's in Australia under the Duntech brand. He moved to Australia from the US because the government gave him a grant to open a speaker research laboratory in Adelaide.
I have learned a lot in the past two years. I read Floyd Toole's book and went to Harman for training. They produce some excellent loudspeakers that are accurate, measure well on and off axis, and sound great. Revel Salon2s are being discontinued, but the F328Be measures better and costs less. JBL M2 is still one of the most accurate speakers.

Dynaudio seems to have embraced John Dunlavy's philosophy (first order crossovers, MTM designs), while Harman believes that fourth order crossovers and waveguides are essential. I would choose Revel or JBL designs over Dunlavy or Dynaudio today. The Harman waveguides and crossovers yield the most seamless transition from treble to midrange I have heard, and the neutral off axis response makes the in room response better.

I recommend Dr. Toole's book to anyone who want to learn more about loudspeakers and room acoustics. I thought I knew a fair amount about both, but discovered I had had a lot to learn. https://routledgetextbooks.com/textbooks/9781138921368/

You would be surprised at how high the demand is for accurate loudspeakers in the home theater market. The use of Room Correction software (DIRAC) and tools like REW (Room EQ Wizard) allow consumers to get near perfect in room response if they start with accurate loudspeakers and multiple subwoofers.


 
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TD_Madden

KotWF
Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
2,494
cheap belt-driven turntable with a couple choices for cartridge (usually an Ortofon). 1963 Fisher 500C receiver and a couple of Klipsch Heresy IIIs...sometimes switch-in a couple smaller Infinity speakers.
 

Rex Anderson

Member
Messages
5,068
Update on my system: I finally have a room where a 5.2.4 system works. I sold the Bryston SP-2 and now use a Lexicon MC-10 surround preamp/processor. I'm using Revel F208's for the front L/R, a Revel C208 center channel and a pair of Revel F206's for surround speakers. I'm planing to get a pair of JBL HDI-1200P subs and four Revel C763L in ceiling speakers for Atmos. I moved the Mackie HR624's and HR626 to my master bedroom for a 3.0 system. I bought another Lexicon MC-10 (they are being discontinued and are almost completely sold out) for that system.
 
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john weires

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
407
I have learned a lot in the past two years. I read Floyd Toole's book and went to Harman for training. There are some excellent speakers that are accurate, measure well and sound great. Revel Salon2s are being discontinued, but the F328Be measures better and costs less. JBL M2 is still one of the most accurate speakers.

Dynaudio seems to have embraced John Dunlavy's philosophy (first order crossovers, MTM designs), while Harman believes that fourth order crossovers and waveguides are essential. I would choose Revel or JBL designs over Dunlavy or Dynaudio today. The (Harman) waveguides and crossovers yield the most seamless transition from treble to midrange I have heard, and the neutral off axis response makes the in room response better.

I recommend Dr. Toole's book to anyone who want to learn more about loudspeakers and room acoustics. I thought I knew a fair amount about both, but discovered I had had a lot to learn. https://routledgetextbooks.com/textbooks/9781138921368/

You would be surprised at how high the demand is for accurate loudspeakers in the home theater market. The use of Room Correction software (DIRAC) and tools like REW (Room EQ Wizard) allow consumers to get near perfect in room response if they start with accurate loudspeakers and multiple subwoofers.


Glad to meet a fellow audio enthusiast with a similar background to mine. I was in the industry for 45 years so I am familiar with Dr. Toole and also did Harman training.
I own the JBL 4367, the passive crossover version of the M2. The business that I previously owned is still operated by my employees and also happens to be a Revel dealer.

I started my audio journey in 1971 at the beginning of the 70's hi-fi boom. Over the years working at various audio specialty stores I saw just about every possible design, some very esoteric (Hill Plasmatronic anyone?), that came to market.

Many designers over the years have used single order networks, custom EQ crossover correction, sealed box alignments, time aligned drivers, vertical symmetrical arrays and high frequency breakup free soft dome drivers.

Duntech/Dunlavy was first, and to my knowledge still unique, in combining them all in a single product. They had exemplary measured performance including the ability to pass square waves.

And all of this was accomplished in the analog domain without the substantial complexity of digital correction whether used internally in the speaker or in the form of room correction after the fact. His speakers were inherently linear to begin with which was very important since digital room correction was in it's infancy in the 90's.

Perusal of older Stereophile test reports bear out the measured accuracy of his speakers at that time. They routinely embarrassed the test results of many high end marque brands. Most importantly his speakers also sounded uncolored and very neutral and were affordable by high end audio standards.

Some of today's DSP powered speakers with the latest digital in room correction do indeed provide a great degree of certain kinds of measured accuracy. But in a lot of cases any problems the speakers might inherently have are "fixed it the mix". How linear would their raw uncorrected response be in an anechoic chamber? I point this out not to denigrate fine well designed speakers using DSP etc but to highlite what an accomplishment Dunlavy's design was for it's time and the staying power they have had over the last several decades.

Not that John Dunlavy was opposed to digital networks or correction. He in fact showed a prototype at CES in Las Vegas in the late 90's but the company did not live long enough to produce it.

Obviously it is unfair to compare what was ultimately possible in speaker design 30 years ago to now. But I have listened to a number of the Dunlavy models that came in on trade in with what's available now and they have held up extremely well with time. Mostly they lack some of the resolution and detail that can be found in better speakers that enjoy today's driver technology. In many cases they still have lower overall coloration.

The study of psycho acoustics aside, there will always be some disagreement over which measurements matter most or correlate best with what we actually hear.
For Harman products smooth constant directivity is hugely important. For Dunlavy a linear step response was the single most important measurement. To get this meant no ports, no networks greater than single pole, no hard dome drivers with their typical high frequency breakup modes. Horns would have been out with their typical pathway errors and stored energy.

I for one did not have much use for the way Harman conducted their consumer listening tests and some of the premises surrounding them, mainly the "Harman Curve".
Nevertheless they are one of the few companies out there trying to make a better more accurate speaker in today's difficult market.
 
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Jared Purdy

Member
Messages
165
Where too start? Turn table is Acoustic Solid "Solid Edition" with their WTB 213 tone arm, fitted with a Benz Micro Wood cartridge. Phono preamp is Gold Note's PH10 and the PSU power supply. Amp is Sim Audio's Moon 7i V2. CD transport and DAC is Sim Audio Moon 650D, tuner is NAD Master Series M4. Speakers are Sonus Faber Olympica III, Cables through out, including biwire speaker cables, XLR and RCA interconnects and power cables are Cardas "Clear Cygnus". All plugged into a Cardas Nautilus power bar. Fun, functional art.
 

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fataxeman

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
2,104
Where too start? Turn table is Acoustic Solid "Solid Edition" with their WTB 213 tone arm, fitted with a Benz Micro Wood cartridge. Phono preamp is Gold Note's PH10 and the PSU power supply. Amp is Sim Audio's Moon 7i V2. CD transport and DAC is Sim Audio Moon 650D, tuner is NAD Master Series M4. Speakers are Sonus Faber Olympica III, Cables through out, including biwire speaker cables, XLR and RCA interconnects and power cables are Cardas "Clear Cygnus". All plugged into a Cardas Nautilus power bar. Fun, functional art.
Quite a nice system you have there and I'm sure it sounds spectacular.

Why is the speaker in the picture (and I assume the other channel as well) partially behind your sofa?

Thanks
 

johntoste

Member
Messages
1,531
NOT MY RIG
It belongs to my friend Rene.
Just posting for porn value.
René's rig Acoustic Signature triple x 'table and arm
Hana cartridge
ModWright/Pioneer sacd player
SPL pre and amp
Synergistic Research cables
Spatial Audio M3 Sapphire speakers
Pretty, pretty good!
 

Ascension

Member
Messages
1,097
My system in the living room is a 1960's Dynaco PAT 4 into a Dynaco ST 120 both with updated boards from update my Dynaco and for now are pushing a set of 1970's JBL L 50's. Sony direct drive turntable from the 1970's and a Sony 100 disc changer.
 

iowa

Corn fed basement hack
Silver Supporting Member
Messages
1,843
NOT MY RIG
It belongs to my friend Rene.
Just posting for porn value.
René's rig Acoustic Signature triple x 'table and arm
Hana cartridge
ModWright/Pioneer sacd player
SPL pre and amp
Synergistic Research cables
Spatial Audio M3 Sapphire speakers
Pretty, pretty good!
Would love to hear the Spatial speakers. I'm jonesing for the Sapphire M5 even though I've never heard them.
 

johntoste

Member
Messages
1,531
Would love to hear the Spatial speakers. I'm jonesing for the Sapphire M5 even though I've never heard them.
Yes, yes. Excellent speakers, definitely worth a listen. Trouble is, they're direct sale, no dealer network. So, to hear them you must "know someone" or get bogged down in a home trial.
Another open baffle speaker I'm interested in hearing has the same logistical issues: Pure Audio Project.
 

grunf

Senior Member
Messages
262
Thanks to Spotify I got rid of almost everything except a pair of bookshelf Kefs and this:

 




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