Potentially VERY stupid pick-up question...

Discussion in 'Luthier's Guitar & Bass Technical Discussion' started by Cheebatone, Nov 12, 2005.


  1. Cheebatone

    Cheebatone Member

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    This sounds like a question that's been asked a million times before but I've done a search and found nothing, so...

    I don't like the out-of-phase sounds on a Strat. Is there any way to wire the 2nd and 4th positions of the blade switch so the p/ups act more like humbuckers? Would I need to replace the (reverse-wound?) middle coil?

    Btw, is in-phase / out-of-phase the same as Series / Parallel? If so, which is which?

    Cheers,

    Charly
     
  2. Jim Collins

    Jim Collins Member

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    Positions 2 and 4 of a Strat are not out of phase. They are in phase, and parallel.

    If you want those two positions to be in phase and in series, you will have to purchase a Strat superswitch. The stock Strat switch is a DPTT switch (double pole, triple throw) with five positions. Positions 2 and 4 are not discreet positions, and that is what you need for positions 2 and 4 to be series positions. The Strat superswitch is a 4P5T switch, which is what you want.

    You would not need to replace any of the pickups. If your middle pickup is RWRP with respect to the other two, the two series positions would still be hum cancelling.
     
  3. Cheebatone

    Cheebatone Member

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    My bad. I've always thought the 'quack' you got in 2 and 4 was called out-of-phase.

    Cheers for the help though, Jim.

    Regards,

    Charly
     
  4. Chiba

    Chiba Gold Supporting Member

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    People call it out of phase, but Jim's - right - it's not out of PHASE. If it was out of phase, the sound would be shrill and super nasal, plus probably way low output.

    When two signals are out of phase with each other, certain spreads of the sound spectrum are cancelled out - you won't hear them. You only hear what gets through. For some reason, with guitar pickups, when they're out of phase it's mostly the low & middle that gets cancelled.

    If two pickups were completely, truly, 100% out of phase, you'd hear nothing.

    It's another instance of 'common use' words being - for lack of a better determiner - wrong.

    Take - as another example - that non-hard-tail bridge on a Strat. What's it called?

    How many people call it a 'tremolo'?

    Well - if that's a tremolo, and my amp has a tremolo circuit in it ... but wait, the two things sound NOTHING alike. One of them is being called the wrong thing - but we (as guitarists) keep doing it!

    --chiba
     
  5. Cheebatone

    Cheebatone Member

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    This was my understanding of the term and it went a long way to causing the confusion I was suffering on this matter.

    Yes. Nobody uses 'Vibrato'. My mother used to call it 'The Wobbler' ...unless she was talking about me, that is... :(
     
  6. Chiba

    Chiba Gold Supporting Member

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    I call it a 'whang bar', unless it's a Floyd Rose type - then it's a 'whammy bar' :D

    --chiba
     
  7. Cheebatone

    Cheebatone Member

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    Thank GOD my mother never called it that! "Hello dear. Playing with your Whang Bar again?" :eek: :eek: :eek: :eek:

    Interestingly (or not, you be the judge) I once had a 335 with a Bigsby. I used to call that 'The Goes (And Stays) Hideously Out Of Tune-a-tron'.
     

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