Power Questions: Ciokolate and The New Board

Discussion in 'Effects, Pedals, Strings & Things' started by somethingclever, Jan 27, 2015.

  1. somethingclever

    somethingclever Gear Addict

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    Hi Guys,

    Putting together a new board using a Cioks Ciokolate as the power supply.
    When the project started my thought was, "16 pedals and 16 outputs on the Ciokolate, perfect." After more research, I have learned it's not that simple.

    For those of you who are familiar with the Ciokolate or pedal power in general, how would you suggest I wire the following pedals? Will some need to be daisy chained? If so, which? Is there anything I should avoid if I don't want to ruin any pedals? Basically, I lack a basic understanding of current draw, voltage, and how it relates to pedals and would be very appreciative for any help.

    Here's the list of pedals and a picture of the board-to-be:

    Polytune Mini: 9V DC, 40 mA
    Lele Little Dual: 8 - 20 V DC or AC, 55 mA
    MXR Carbon Copy: 9 V DC, 26 mA
    EQD Afterneath: 9 V DC, 65 mA
    EHX Micro POG: 9.6 V DC, 200 mA
    TC Ditto X2: 9 V DC, 150 mA min.
    Smallsound Buzzz: 9 V DC, 18 mA
    EHX Superego: 9 V DC, 140 mA
    Wampler Sovereign: 9 V DC, 4 mA
    Snazzy FX Mini Ark: 9 V DC, 200-650 mA
    Iron Ether Subterranea: 9 V DC, ? mA
    Darkglass B3k: 9 V DC, 20 mA
    Darkglass Duality: 9 V DC, 20 mA
    Timmy: 9 V DC, ? mA
    T1M Buffered Volume Pedal: ?
    T1M Mini Buffer: ?

    [​IMG]

    Thank you kindly...
     
  2. somethingclever

    somethingclever Gear Addict

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  3. off2kamp

    off2kamp Member

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    I don't have the time to think that all through but you are def right 16 outlets does not equal 16 pedals because some of those outlets you can only use 1 of 2 choices for the slot. I ended up having to make a spreadsheet to figure mine out. You will def need to daisy chain. most pedals can handle a bit more current than they are listed for (someone correct me if I am wrong), but you def don't want to give a pedal more voltage than it can handle. Since you don't seem to have anything that requires AC voltage maybe you don't need a Coikolate.
     
  4. somethingclever

    somethingclever Gear Addict

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    Thanks man. Yea, that's what I'm learning. Still trying to find a way to make it work before moving on...
     
  5. somethingclever

    somethingclever Gear Addict

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  6. gibs5000

    gibs5000 Member

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    pedals only consume as much current as they need, so you won't damage a pedal that consumes about 20mA by connecting it to a slot that offers 400mA

    in general, don't under current a pedal, and don't over voltage a pedal. Undercurrent won't necessarily damage the pedal, but it more than likely wont work (if the pedal is digital) or it will not work as intended. But overvoltage, unless the manufacturer says that its ok to run at a higher voltage, will usually result in damage.
     
  7. vibrostrat43

    vibrostrat43 Supporting Member

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    The lower the current draw a pedal has the less noise it will induce into the power line, so generally drives, boosts, and fuzzes can be daisy chained without affecting the signal to noise ratio very much. However, there are definitely some pedals that are more sensitive to noise in the power line than others, and those pedals, if they happen to be boosting signal level or adding drive, will boost the noise as well.

    So what I'm saying is probably the easiest way to figure what to daisy is to put as many drives, and boosts and such on one chain as you can, and then try isolating different ones as you have them on and you'll quickly find out if any of your gain pedals are sensitive to power line noise. The ones that are you can isolate and the ones that aren't very sensitive you can daisy chain.

    From my experience usually drives are totally fine, but the more dirt they put on the more likely they are to amplify noise, compressors are usually better left isolated even if they themselves don't draw much current because they amplify noise, and how much extra noise a boost adds depends on how much boost you're using (just small boost and you're probably fine to daisy chain, but giving a fairly large boost you may want to isolate).

    A high current pedal could possibly be on the same as another pedal if neither is boosting the signal level in any way, but generally it takes almost all of the current on a high current tap to power a high current pedal, and the only current left over could only power a low current pedal which are usually the type of pedals that boost signal.

    Also, different power schemes can effect what type of noise a pedal will induce as well. I used to have a Strymon Brigadier, and an EHX DMMTT110 (kinda wish I still that crazy good delay section), and they had similar current draw, but the Brigadier added a much high pitched whine that was much more audible than the EHX if either were daisy chained. That's not a slam against Strymon stuff at all, but just the way they power it caused that kind of noise if the pedal wasn't isolated, and both pedals were designed to be isolated.

    So there are a lot of factors that play into noise in a board, and I gave some general guidelines that help, but the only way to finalize your board is trial and error.
     
  8. somethingclever

    somethingclever Gear Addict

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    Thanks guys, this is some incredibly helpful info. Usually I plug things in first and ask questions later so hopefully this will help me avoid any potential screw ups....
     

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