Praise & Worship: Starting Pedal Suggestions - New to TGP!

Discussion in 'Effects, Pedals, Strings & Things' started by brand0nized, Jan 24, 2012.

  1. brand0nized

    brand0nized Member

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    Hey guys! I just signed up for the TGP forum. My friend directed me here upon my interest in picking up electric guitar.

    A little about me:
    I'm 16 (Whoo! Fun!). I lead worship at my church. So far, I'm playing mostly acoustic guitar and lately have been trying to play piano. I know my basic chord structure and theory. I've only poked around with the electric guitar a little bit.

    I think I really want to go more into electric guitar and expand my musicianship. For now I'm going to stick with an old Fender Strat (I think it's one of those from Costco) and an old DigiTech RP3. I'm going to practice more with these before I buy my own semi-hollow (currently eye-balling the Epiphone Wild Kat) and more pedals. Right now, I want to get some pedals to play with. I like feeling the knobs and tweaking sound that way.

    Does anyone have any suggestions for me on where to start off pedals/effects-wise? (I'm okay with used gear in good condition!)

    Here's what I'm looking for:
    -Budget/Starting-out prices
    -Not crappy quality (my ears won't know the difference, but it'll give me confidence knowing that it's somewhat good)
    -Not too heavy on the rock sounds. The most rock I'll go is old-school rock bands like Switchfoot and Lifehouse
    -Sometimes warm mellow strumming tones

    Sounds I'm influenced by and would like to emulate:
    -Tenth Avenue North
    -David Crowder*Band
    -Hillsong United
    -Starfield
    -Switchfoot
    -Lifehouse

    Please give me your opinions and suggestions! I'm a dry sponge and your knowledge is water!
     
  2. thesooze

    thesooze Member

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    Go ahead and put yourself on the list for a Timmy overdrive pedal by Paul Cochrane.

    His number is 615-896-8555.

    It'll take a while, but it's only $129 that way. You'll thank me later :aok

    Also pick up a good delay pedal. I'd recommend a Boss DD-20 to get you started.
     
  3. ChorusCrackpot

    ChorusCrackpot Member

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    Go into the music shop, try everything and see what you like.
    TGP is notorious to recommend highly priced boutique niche music equipment based on inflated self-status & hype. Honestly I would take most of this forum with a grain of salt.


    If a particular device sounds good to your ears, then that is all that matters. "Quality" is irrelevant. Confidence comes from inside yourself, not in what others judge.




    Those bands you mentioned seem rather modern to me, not at all "old school rock", or even rock for that matter. But that's fine- you're free to enjoy whatever you want. Any amplifier or dirt pedal should suffice, just keep the Gain level low if you don't want the sound to be too "heavy".
     
  4. jkokura

    jkokura Member

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    The sounds the bands you listed are often filled with delay, so the recommendation to look into those is a good place to start. Often, a staple worship board (and i also lead and play at church) would include a tuner that mutes your signal, a way to either boost or drive your signal (an overdrive or distortion pedal will do both) and one or more delay pedals. If your amp is a solid tube amp, you can often get a lot of great sounds out of a simple 2-4 pedal setup, especially if you're playing rhythm.

    When I was your age and was learning to lead with an electric guitar, I owned Boss CS-3, an Ibanez TS-9, A Boss CH-1, and a Boss DD-3. You can have all of those pedals for about 200 bucks used. Load that on a $50 pedaltrain nano and grab a $20 onespot and a $10 daist for power. As you develop, you can sell or trade to upgrade and add to your setup. No joke, that's how I did it.

    The downside to this is that you're not getting what's considered the best around here. If you don't have a lot of money, you'll probably get tonnes of suggestions in a thread like this for gear you can't afford. That'd be alright to do, but you may or may not really get into this stuff. If you spend a lot now you may not get it back out if you leave this behind. If you spend a little now, you'll probably have more fun with that Epi you're looking at.

    Jacob
     
  5. jkokura

    jkokura Member

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    I very much agree with you, but to a 16 year old some of those bands have been around longer than he's been alive!

    Jacob
     
  6. ChorusCrackpot

    ChorusCrackpot Member

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    I'm not that much older than him, but most of music around isn't really old school- it takes at least few decades to even begin to be considered that. Different perceptions..I guess.
     
  7. telecasting

    telecasting Member

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    +1 for the 2-4 pedal setup Jacob suggests. Tuner, overdrive, delay will pretty much do it. What I would say is don't worry much about getting the best now, because you might find you find that you want something different and end up getting rid of something great and getting something rubbish. I swapped a great ibanez tubescreamer (ts9) for a boss cs3 compressor that I just don't use, and regret it, but I had at 19 no reference of what was better/fair etc.

    Also, use that digitech to find tones that you really like and don't be afraid to keep on using it for anything you haven't managed to buy if you so start playing electric in church.
     
  8. jimbugg

    jimbugg Supporting Member

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    Hey!

    Welcome to TGP--it is indeed a wealth of knowledge (and opinions!) that you'll find helpful, I think.

    I'm 17 and leading worship at church, so looks like we're in the same boat! Here's my current "church" pedalboard:

    [​IMG]

    I'm a huge Switchfoot fan and definitely going for a Drew Shirley vibe.

    I'm playing a Gibson Les Paul Goldtop, into the pedals (ZVex SHO - boost > ZVex Fuzz Factory - fuzz > JHS Sweet Tea - overdrive > Whirlwind Phaser - phaser > Strymon El Capistan - delay), into my amp, a 1960s Kay combo "set like it's about to explode," in Drew's words.

    I'm a huge effects junky, so for me that's a pretty basic setup. Essentially, what you're going to need starting out leading worship is, as others have said, a tuner, an overdrive pedal, and a delay.

    Tuners can be had easily and pretty cheaply--check out the Boss TU-2/3 or the TC Electronics Polytune

    Overdrives are literally everywhere. The Paul C Timmy is a very god one that seems to be really, really popular on here. I'd also check out the Ibanez TS-9 Tubescreamer, which is a very classic OD pedal and appears on Drew's pedalboard.

    Delays are also everywhere. Most of the Boss DD series would be highly recommended for a beginner. I'd also check out the Line 6 Echo Park, myself.

    I think most, if not everyone, on here will agree that your guitar and amp are also really important. I know you said you were looking at an Epiphone WildKat. For the music you want to play, I'd suggest looking at either Epiphone Les Pauls or Squier/MIM (Made in Mexico) Fender Telecasters--those should hit the nail on the head for the sound you're going for.

    What kind of amp are you using?

    Giving us a budget and some pictures of your current gear will help out, too.

    Hope this helps!

    Jim
     
  9. Ben C.

    Ben C. Member

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  10. jgribble57

    jgribble57 Member

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    +1 Delay. Essential for a lot of P&W music and excellent at creating an ambient atmosphere. I'd suggest that you want to be sure it has a tap tempo and you can do dotted 8th delays.

    Also, I'd highly recommend in your situation to consider multi-fx. Analog has tons of benefits, but come with limitations as well. Biggest one in your situation is cost. You could buy one standalone delay pedal that sounds great, or for the same price (or even less) get a pedal that offer multiple pedals including delay, overdrive chorus, compression etc. that good but let you do many more things. These can be good in front of an amp and offer modeling so you can plug straight into the sound system which can be useful for playing in some churches.

    Two examples are POD HD300($329) and Zoom G3($199). Both would offer high quality tones and a lot of choices to experiment with.

    In addition to the forum referenced above, check out the guitar praise forum and blog, they have lots of useful info.

    http://guitarpraise.17.forumer.com/
    http://www.guitarpraise.blogspot.com
     
  11. voorhiessa

    voorhiessa Member

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    Personally, I'd say get a nice, but cheaper multieffext unit, like a Line 6 M9 ($275 used). Simple to use and you can figure out which tones/effects you enjoy. Another would be the Boss ME70 ($200 used) or it's cheaper lil brother, the ME50 ($100-125 used). They are both "knob friendly" in that you dont have to wade through menus to change settings.

    If you really want pedals: Blues Driver, Tubescreamer, Boss DD7 (the DD7's built in looper will help you work on your skills), and a fun modulation pedal--like a phaser, flanger, etc.

    Should be able to get all that for around $200.
     
    Last edited: Jan 24, 2012
  12. powermatt99

    powermatt99 Member

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    I'm doing a youth P&W guitar clinic next month. I'm putting together a PT-Nano with just a stock TS-9 and stock DD-5 to illustrate the simplicity with which you can get good P&W sounds. Love it or hate it, most P&W guitar gear is just an offshoot of the TS-9 & DD-5 sound. Many of the musicians at my clinic are around your age with limited budget constraints. A used TS-9 and used DD-5 should run you about $160 and would be easily obtainable (i found both within a day in the emporium). Once you have a TS-9 or TS-type pedal and a reliable delay, you can add as you get more funds or get your parents to pitch in for xmas and birthdays and good grades or whatever.

    EDIT: I'm going to disagree with some of my TGP colleagues about the MFX devices. They usually require more time (some substantially more) time to dial in than simple stomp boxes. Pedals can be quickly interchanged and added to or subtracted from. With MFX units, you're stuck with what you get and they often require a greater percentage of your budget than individual stomp boxes.
     
    Last edited: Jan 24, 2012
  13. BigWave

    BigWave Member

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    I have found for the music your playing a delay and OD are most used. A delay with tap tempo will be helpful. I big delay out of synch sounds odd. And when you dial in your OD/Distortion, find a level you like then then dial it back some. The beginner tendency is to crank in too much distortion.
     
  14. guitarz1972

    guitarz1972 Member

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    +1 on all points stated.
     
  15. dlc1953

    dlc1953 Member

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  16. ToneRanger72

    ToneRanger72 Member

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    Volume is often a big issue - alot of times you can't get the amp loud enough to really sing and sustain, so OD's that have some natural compression and touch sensitivity will really help. A compressor or clean boost like the EP Booster will help on clean guitar parts.
    I find for rhythm OD's it's important to have something flat-ish or "transparent" as folks like to say - reason being that in the P&W genre it a cardinal rule (pardon the pun) that the vocals be heard. You don't want your OD or distortion's voice to be in that midrange competing with the vocals - guaranteed the sound man will drop your guitar down in the mix before he touches the vocals.
    I'm guessing this need for a "transparent" EQ arc is why pedals like the Tim/Timmy are so popular on P&W boards.
     
  17. cwcashiniv

    cwcashiniv Member

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    Welcome to TGP, brand0nized!

    In a short time, you'll realize that most people around here spend way too much time (and money) here, and it's an easy thing to do. I'm a P&W guy among other band endeavors, and I think the guys here are steering you well.

    1. Tuner. No doubt, one of the most important pieces of gear to own - after all, an out-of-tune guitarist is just plain obnoxious. :bonk Look into the Boss TU-2, Korg Pitchblack, Tc Polytune, or for TGP purism, the Turbo Tuner. I personally love my Pitch Black.

    2. Pick up a tubescreamer (TS pedal) of sorts. A TS-9, TS-808, or Full Drive 2 are all popular pedals for OD in P&W. In the same price range, you can look into cmatmods pedals. Very affordable, and Hillsong/United's guitar players are using the Butah and Signa Drives.

    2. Pick up a delay. Either a Bodd DD-5 or DD-7, DD-20, or Line 6 DL4 are all popular choices. The Tc Nova Repeater and Nova Delay are solid choices as well. The DD-20, DL4, and Nova Delay all have abilities to store presets, which is helpful for Sunday morning/youth set lists. Bottom line: you'll need something with a tap tempo for tapping to the click/music. Oh, and I would strongly recommend learning to tap a .1/8 rhythm. PM me for more details about it if you're interested, but the .1/8 pattern is typical of many Hillsong/P&W delay lines on guitar, and it will benefit you a lot to learn how to tap that pattern into any 1/4 note tempo without a dedicated .1/8 setting.

    Everything else is extra, really. But yeah - start with the above. Oh, and CALL PAUL COCHRANE AND GET ON THE LIST FOR A TIMMY! :drool For $129, it's one of the best low-gain ODs available. You'll have about 3 months to get together the money for it with no up-front cost! :aok
     
  18. dave12

    dave12 No commericals! No mercy!

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    Welcome to TGP!

    I'll add to the "get and Overdrive & Delay" theme. Get those two and PRACTICE, PRACTICE, PRACTICE! I started when I was about your age and found that the more time I spent with pedals, the less time I spent practicing. Get a couple of pedals and then work on your craft. As you progress, you can add more pedals and upgrade your board.

    If you have a tuner (easy to find a used one for cheap--Boss, Polytune, Turbo Tuner) and then add a cheap OD (like an Ibanez Ts9 or Timmy, as mentioned above) and a cheap Delay (Boss DD5/DD6, TC Flashback), you can keep it around $200 total. I wouldn't even bother with a board with only three pedals. I gig bag worked perfect for me. You can just throw all your patch cables and your power supply (onespot) into the bag and be ready to go in minutes.

    By the way, all of those pedals I mentioned are used by tons of pros, so it doesn't take a huge budget to have a huge sound.
     
  19. NHBluesMan

    NHBluesMan Member

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    if you're leading from electric, all you NEED is a good tap tempo delay, and 2 gain stages.... this video is a prime example- the 'Droff has a huge pedalboard, but he shows how you only really need a good delay and acouple drive stages
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uyHvABOuAUs

    for delay i'd recommend: Boss DD-5, DD-7, DD-20, Visual Sound Tap Delay or Dual Tap Delay, or the Line 6 DL4
    for overdrives i'd recommend: Timmy/tubescreamer combo, Tubescreamer/Rat combo, Fulltone Fulldrive, Visual Sound Double Trouble, Jekyll & Hyde, or Route 66, or a This1sMyne Pearl

    but really, i think someplace good to start would be an M9, cause it's got ALOT of options, and then if you like it you can stick with it, or you can see what patches you like buy pedals according to those sounds

    Welcome to the Gear Page- also, if you're on facebook, there's a group on there called Gear Talk: Praise & Worship that you can get some great help from as well
     
  20. Jammer2393

    Jammer2393 Member

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    Definately get yourself an overdrive and delay. also, get yourself a tuner off craigslist or ebay or something (Boss TU-2, Polytune, Korg Pitchblack all great choices)
     

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