Princeton Reverb: loud enough?

pfender

Member
Messages
10
Hey everyone,

This is my first post! hooray. I recently bought a '68 silverface princeton reverb, and I am considering selling my AC-30 reissue (CC212) in order to buy other stuff. My only concern is, is the princeton really loud enough for full-band situations? If I have a PA I assume it won't really be a problem but if not am I in a tight spot? As a side note... it does have an external speaker out. Would it be plausible to run the princeton with another small cab to bring it up to a decent volume? thanks so much for your time and comments!

-pfender
 

sethr

Member
Messages
467
I have a BF Princeton (not a P Reverb). I use a Premier reverb with it, and I gig with it all the time. It's plenty loud enough for the majority of my gigs.
 

chrisr777

Member
Messages
25,729
It really depends on the type of music and the room you are going to play. If you are playing Death Metal I would have to say no.

I would not try running a cab from the Princeton, but it depends on how the cab is rated.
 

Lance

Member
Messages
10,867
I borrowed a 65 BF P Reverb for a couple of gigs, and never turned it up past 6. Well, not entirely true, for one of those gigs I borrowed two of those from the same friend. Because the ONLY thing better than playing through one of those, is playing through two of them in stereo! Got lotsa compliments on my sound at that gig, and I usually play through a SF Twin Reverb. Really nails the Gilmour tone with a good strat.
 

gjf

Member
Messages
559
Congratulations! They are wonderful amps -- whether they cut it on a gig depends on numerous factors -- stage setup, room requirements, drummer volume, whether you have to get your sound over another guitar, etc. I have gigged frequently with SF and BF Deluxe Reverbs and have had it go both ways -- too much juice or not enough. So, depending on context, there are bound to be times when the PR is not enough, but when it is it will sound great -- they are my favorite all-time amp and I recently picked up a '68 drip edge after foolishly selling my BF PR a few years ago.
 

ando

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
347
this works really well...get an extra baffle for a 12" speaker..put in a jbl d or k-120 speaker...you'll be able to keep up & cut through a 10 piece band with horns & run the amp to get all that beautiful princeton reverb power tube goodness..if need be, stick a mike in front of it..
 

slider313

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
8,705
I had an early '69 and put in an Altec Lansing 10. I could do most small gigs with it. I had a good drummer who knew dynamics.
 

1973Marshall

Member
Messages
6,934
I'd say NO

I have played Casinos with it and lol I was too loud on 2 (but stage volume there is LOWWWWWWW)

Problem is when I need clean headroom its not great. For rehearsal and gigs where mic'd very well, yes it can be pretty good. I don't think it's ideal for rock bands or even blues unless you have 2, or you wanna mix in another amp.
 

hasserl

Member
Messages
4,708
Swap out the output transformer for a Deluxe OT and it'll do small club gigs easily. Add the PaulC and the Stokes mods and it'll really sing.
 

tallcharly

Member
Messages
88
Here's a short clip of my PR. Straight in, custom cab no pedals, twelve inch speaker. The guitar is a Japanese Thinline Re-Issuue from 1991 that has a lot of changes.

Since i live in the Philippines i always have one foot in heaven when my friend Bruce Conte is in town!

We are playing with the local band from Davao City called "Souled Out"!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FZgF9gpScJI








Retired and living the good life in Davao City Philippines.
 

mcuguitar

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
2,227
NOOOOOOOO! A Princeton Reverb is NOT loud enough for anything above a jazz or dinner party type gig. It's just not. It loses it's headroom pretty fast, so good luck playing any clean passages over a loud drummer...it ain't gonna happen, no matter what some of these cats are saying. REPEAT...you will get buried! I know what I'm talking about here.... I've owned 2 Princeton silver faces, 3 Deluxes, 2 Pro Reverb Silverfaces, 4 Vibroluxes both silver and blackface, 1 super reverb, a Bassman, 3 different Twins and 1 Vibroverb. Now, all that being said...a cool rig to use is TWO Princeton Reverbs in STEREO! Now you've doubled your wattage, and that setup is very giggable in most situations. TWO Deluxe Reverbs running in stereo is one of the best Fender sounds you can get, period, and will cover almost all gigs except metal or very hard rock. But please don't make me laugh...1 little Princeton is NOT going to make it in most gigging situations outside of jazz. Peace, Jon.
 

mcuguitar

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
2,227
Now I have to go to my gig, and I'm not taking a little Princeton Reverb! I'm running a Kingsley Deluxe 30 with a single twelve celestion. 30 watts of EL84 power is the real deal. Peace, Jon.
 
M

Member 995

It really depends on the situation. Loud rock band with a second guitarist? Probably not loud enough. Smaller gig with some restraint? Maybe loud enough, though it depends how clean you need the amp to be.

Bryan
 

mcuguitar

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
2,227
And I believe the guy who started the thread is talking about a stock Princeton...if you put a good 12 in there...it's a whole other ballgame.
 

cameron

Member
Messages
4,435
And I believe the guy who started the thread is talking about a stock Princeton...if you put a good 12 in there...it's a whole other ballgame.

Yes, the speaker is key. The stock speakers vary in quality, but are generally not very good. An upgrade to a 12" baffle and a more efficient speaker can make a huge difference. Even leaving the 10" baffle in there and swapping in a more efficient 10" speaker will make a big difference.

The Princeton has enough room in the cabinet to hold a "real" speaker. (Unlike a Champ, which has rather cramped quarters.)
 

karmadave

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
4,756
Try an Allen Sweet Spot. It's 'loosely based on a a Princeton Reverb', but with larger transformers, a 12" speaker, and a few other nice features such as the Mid/Raw control. 25-watts with 6L6's or 18-watts with 6V6's.

If you are playing at a gig, with another guitarist, drummer and bass player, then a stock PR does not have the headroom to keep up. It will quickly become lost in the mix.

PR is a great studio/home amp. Not so good for gigs...

-KD
 

TimmyP

Member
Messages
2,488
Swap out the output transformer for a Deluxe OT and it'll do small club gigs easily. Add the PaulC and the Stokes mods and it'll really sing.

I've not heard the PaulC mod, but the others are very worthwhile.

It can also help to decrease the size of the coupling caps between the PI and the outputs. On a friend's amp we went with 1/10 the original value. We also put a RI Alnico Jensen in it. It's a fine sounding amp, and has plenty of level for the stage. (Yes, it is a bit low on clean power, but you can get great results using an A-B switch with another amp for cleans.)
 




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