Pro Tools or Boss? Website? - Thanks!

Discussion in 'Recording/Live Sound' started by tch2112, Jul 10, 2005.

  1. tch2112

    tch2112 Member

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    Hi, all I have a couple of recording questions for you.

    Can anyone comment on the basic pros/cons of using a Pro-Tools solution vs. say a Boss BR or other digital device?

    I also would like to please see if anyone has the ProTools web address?

    I was talking to a friend of mine and commenting that I was going to most likely get a Boss - he said that he was seriously going to look at pro-tools as he did a session with an engineer that had a pro-tools set up and that he thought it was pretty slick.

    Thanks much! Tom
     
  2. covert

    covert Member

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    If you just want to demo stuff for yourself, the boss may be the way to go.

    The PT rig, or equivalent (logic, DP, etc.) is open ended, in the sense that it can grow with your needs. It will also allow easy export to pro users systems, if you are getting serious tracks.

    The Boss probably records in a compressed format, which is both bad for the sound, and will not export well.

    Analyze your needs carefully, before choosing.
     
  3. melondaoust

    melondaoust Member

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    www.digidesign.com

    Agree with covert - PT (or any DAW) can grow and accomodate.

    The Boss looks like it has a limited OS - don't know if you can upgrade what's in there as far as FX, EQ, etc. Another plus for any computer-based system where if you don't like the Reverb, you can buy the plugin you want.

    Besides, the MBox is pretty reasonably priced, so the possibility of owning a PT system is feasable for anybody.

    FWIW, I use an Mbox with Pro Tools LE - and I LOVE it!
     
  4. onemind

    onemind Member

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    I've always contended the best reason for getting a pro-tools rig is the ability to take the session to a "pro" studio for mixing, mastering etc. Start your project on your mbox (which you bought used for under 400.) and should the need arise take the session to a top-flight studio anywhere in the world for overdubs. The potential for expansion is there as well. Of course if you don't have a pro-tools capable computer at home, the cost rises significantly.

    Steve
     
  5. Optimus Prime

    Optimus Prime Member

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  6. straticus

    straticus Member

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    I'd go PT, or most any DAW set up (I prefer Samplitude Pro myself) before I'd opt for one of those "all in one" boxes any day.
     
  7. gixxerrock

    gixxerrock Member

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    I am in the minority here, but I have used and loved an standalone "all in one" box for the past five years. There are other units that may be a better choice than the Boss. My five year old Korg D16 will do 24 bit uncompressed recording and you shouldn't settle for less.

    Pros
    - There is no PC in your studio. My day job is a professional software engineer and I have a real aversion to having a PC intrude into my creative space. IMO, PCs are cheap, ugly, noisy, unreliable, take up a lot of space and have lousy tactile feel. Macs are much better, or if you know what you are doing you can build a decent PC.
    - Portable. It is easy to throw in a gig bag and bring it to band practice. Unless you get a laptop, PCs do not like being moved.
    - It is a small dedicated unit designed to do one thing well. Buttons are tactile and well laid out. Screen is touch-screen (no mouse). To get this feel in a PC system, you need a dedicated control surface.
    - More stable system that will age better. In my experience, PCs get constantly upgraded and replaced every 3 years. Most PC people I know have boxes of old obsolete PC junk (hard drives, intermittent power supplies, 128MB RAM chips, graphics cards, 15" monitors, keyboards with keys that don't work ...)
    - Once you learn it, very easy to use. I like the fact that when the urge hits, I can hit the power button, and 10 seconds later I can hit the record button.
    - Sound quality is very good. Electrically and acoustically very quiet.

    Cons
    - Not good for extensive editing. It is easy enough to fix mistakes but is the wrong tool for throwing down 10 ideas to cut and paste into a song.
    - Not easily upgradable. On some, you can upgrade an IDE hard drive, CD writer, or reflash the bios but you should really think about it as non-upgradable. Whatever functionality you get now, is more or less what you are stuck with until you drop another big chunk of $$ on something new.
    - Fixed number of butttons and small screen force user interface to be a little non-intuitive at times.
    - Will ultimately fall a little short of pro quality. You will not be able to produce the next Britanny Spears or Madonna album on it, but I'm sure you could have done her first one.

    Many PC/PT people will strongly disagree with my statements and have excellent rebuttals. For non-pro home use, I think it boils down to personal preference and how you will use it.

    Shawn.
     
  8. melondaoust

    melondaoust Member

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    I'm Mac/PT - that works for me.

    If you're happy with your Korg D16, that's cool!

    Happy with just a Tascam 4-track, great!

    Big, BIG +1 on this statement.
     
  9. tch2112

    tch2112 Member

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    This is very good and important data!

    Thanks!

    Tom
     
  10. Optimus Prime

    Optimus Prime Member

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    I had a D16, couldn't get it to work for me. It basically comes down to what you want to use it for...
     
  11. covert

    covert Member

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    I'm not a PT advocate, hence my mention of other daw options. If I had my druthers, I'd be doing 2" analog. Time, money and maintenance issues prevent that, so my place centers around Tascam mdm.

    The point I was trying to make, is that a recording rig should be chosen as appropriate to the use intended. I got a lot more songwriting and playing done when I only had a 4 track cassette rig, and very little outboard. Now I seem to spend more time behind my racks than playing.

    All that said, I'll end up with some sort of daw system, but I've not yet settled one which one. I have a ptle setup, and there are good things to be said about it. There are also down sides.
     
  12. tch2112

    tch2112 Member

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  13. LSchefman

    LSchefman Member

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    I have a pretty extensive recording rig, and use a Mac with a bunch of hardware and software.

    But I wouldn't recommend the computer/software/hardware thing to everyone. It all depends on one's needs and working preferences.

    There is no question in my mind that for many purposes, a standalone unit has some advantages:

    1. Portability
    2. It won't crash
    3. Ease of use
    4. built-in mic preamps
    5. built-in mixer for adding synths and outboard gear
    6. Cost

    The drawbacks are noted in other posts.

    To me, the biggest drawback to using a computer, plus software, plus hardware, is that it can impede rather than help the initial creative process. There's a real advantage to a tactile surface designed to do a few things easily and well.
     
  14. joseph

    joseph Member

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    Ultimately, I went (as a beginner) with a PC/Cubase SX3 system, as I REALLY wanted authentic sounding Drum programs, and I pretty much have that with BFD acoustic drum module....ie, real recorded drum hits. The Boss units still sound more artificial.

    The Boss units have an excellent rep for multi-tracking a live performance, then burn a CD off the unit itself. But downloading files from a Boss to a PC takes literally hours, so not a good idea to use both units (also way $$).

    Cubase is now a blast as I can play 'engineer'....effects loops, panning, backward tracks, etc etc.

    OK NOW THE DOWNSIDE of the PC...

    1) 2-3x the cost of boss.
    2) The PC was broken on arrival from FEd Ex...I learned computer repair..
    3) Initially, Cubase was DAUNTING....probably ALL these programs at this level are - by that, I mean the manuals are wriiten by the tech-heads who have designed these programs, (originally in German to boot) -

    You can spend many hours/many sessions going nowhere. The on-line forums and especially newsgroups can be helpful.

    But if you're more plug and play and got a drummer already, especially if you're going to record live music in different places, the Boss may be the thing.
    If you're more of a 'studio rat' solo guy, keyboard into software synths, etc, maybe computer.

    You can download a free PC type program called ?Krystal to try it out, or a Saw Studio demo.
    Good Luck!
     
  15. matte

    matte Senior Member

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    Mac G5 guy here. On my 4th computer since getting into the DAW game in 1998. Been running DP from Jump Street. Now really digging Abelton Live (running as a Rewire vibe inside of DP). The whole chip coffin scenario is great for hobbyists(not that there's anything wrong with that).

    The real questions are simple. Can you learn quickly? What are your objectives?
     
  16. matte

    matte Senior Member

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    It's not what happens to you. It's how you deal with it. I accept a certain amount of instability in order to achieve the kind of result/power/flexibility/independence/etc. that I get with thie DAW medium. Crashes can usually be narrowed down to a few key elements.
     
  17. Cody McLain

    Cody McLain Member

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    Matte,
    Forgive my lack of understanding, but what does Abelton Live do for you in this context? I just aquired a Mac G5 and I'mseriously leaning towards DP as two very close friends use/know it well. Just trying to learn as much as possible.....
     
  18. matte

    matte Senior Member

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    Sample/loop based madness.
     
  19. joseph

    joseph Member

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    Matte,

    Is this a Zen principle? (Not a wise-guy question, I'm genuinely interested in these issues)- thanks.
     
  20. matte

    matte Senior Member

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    It's a solution oriented approach to work.
     

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