Prog Rock players - favorite Pedals?

Discussion in 'Effects, Pedals, Strings & Things' started by moPHOmo, Jan 14, 2020.

  1. moPHOmo

    moPHOmo Member

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    What are your fave pedals to use for prog? Looking for ideas
     
  2. OotMagroot

    OotMagroot Supporting Member

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    I play prog. I'm more into 70s prog and Neo-Prog to be exact

    The pedals I use:

    Fuzz Face
    Phaser
    Tube Screamer
    RAT
    Chorus
    Digital Delay
    Analog Delay
    Reverb

    EDIT: Ooooh forgot Flanger, LOL
     
    Last edited: Jan 14, 2020
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  3. CharAznable

    CharAznable Member

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    I play prog, but I don't think there's anything about prog that requires prog specific pedals.

    My gigging board contains an OCD, a '70, an HX Stomp, an EHX Freeze and a Ditto, but I could easily use the same thing for any other genre.
     
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  4. Skip Reid

    Skip Reid Supporting Member

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    Cool thread. I am just using my HX Stomp to get Petrucci sounds. I would like to know more about what individual pedals are used though. Great idea.
     
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  5. Daniel Krawchuk

    Daniel Krawchuk Member

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    Prog is really such a diverse style of music that I don't know if there are any sounds specific to the genre. There's the classic stuff like Yes, Genesis, King Crimson, Rush etc; there is newer prog metal like Opeth, The Sword, Tool or Chon; and there is my fave, jammy prog like Umphrey's McGee, Phish, Consider the Source (they are closer to metal though), Dopapod etc. There are stoner-ish bands with vague prog influences too like King Gizzard and the Lizard Wizard, and there are tons more in all those genres that I'm missing. There is even acoustic prog-folk like Alan Stivell or Bert Jansch's incredible album, Avocet.

    I really love it all and definitely have that influence in my bass playing (I'm in several bands, all of which have some proggy influence among a lot of other stuff). I like using my Digitech Bass Whammy, EQD Westwood, Pigtronix Bass Fat Drive, SA Mercury Flanger, MXR BEF, and some delays and reverb and compressor. Definitely interested in how other people approach this type of music!
     
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  6. Anarchist Andy

    Anarchist Andy Member

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    You're gonna need a wah pedal.
     
  7. jimijimmyjeffy

    jimijimmyjeffy Member

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    I can talk about my pedals I like, but can't really think of anything specific to prog. I would say it is situation specific to the band and tunes.

    I do think fuzz is good due to changing dynamics. That's good for going from pastoral cleans to aggressive sections instantly. Then you need to enhance your cleans somehow. That's about it.
     
  8. Serious Poo

    Serious Poo Powered by Coffee Gold Supporting Member

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    Ditched my pedalboard and went rack. Too many limitation with pedal-based systems for my tastes.

    That said...

    OP in your specific case, I would start by asking yourself what specific sounds you think you will actually use and only then look at designing your pedal layout.

    For example, a volume pedal, a great OD or Distortion, a Noise Gate, a Chorus or Flanger, a Delay and a EQ can cover a crazy amount of ground. But you might not like songs with those, you might want something entirely different. Be you, go with what you want. Not what a bunch of Internet forum jockies tell you. :D

    Also, rather than getting hung up over brands and manufacturers, I would start with the actual sounds you like. Be as specific as possible, and note the band, song and album it’s on and then research how it was recorded. Find the actual gear that was used to make it and either get an original or a very good clone. Then play the hell out of everything. That would be my advice.
     
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  9. hippieboy

    hippieboy Member

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    All of them!
     
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