"Progressive" Blues bands/guitarists

Doomrider78

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I know the word "progressive" is anathema to many blues fans but there should be room for progression and evolution in all styles of music, IMO.

Who would you deem the most progressive blues bands/guitarists around today? Of course, "progressive " can be open to interpretation but I'll leave that up to you.

Ive often thought mixing traditional blues (not blues rock) with stoner rock/metal would be a good way to produce some interesting/progressive music. Is anyone doing that?

The two that initially spring to mind are Clutch and Earthless.
 
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Barquentine

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A lot of the U.K bands of the late sixties started as blues bands and mutated into something else. The Groundhogs were John Lee Hooker's band when he visited the U.K. A few years later they were doing this:

 

Doomrider78

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A lot of the U.K bands of the late sixties started as blues bands and mutated into something else. The Groundhogs were John Lee Hooker's band when he visited the U.K. A few years later they were doing this:

As I said in the OP, I'm taking about bands/guitsrists around today, preferably newish.

As an aside, I met Tony McPhee at a music festival in Bristol a few years ago: we had a good chat with him about his set, the festival and music in general. Seemed like a nice guy.
 

Echoplexi

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Radio Moscow might fit the bill for you, especially if you’re offering Earthless as an example


 

bdonnelly

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Funny you should mention them as they crossed my mind when I was writing the OP.
It's kinda like asking if anyone is mixing rap and rock twenty years ago and the only real legit was Rage Against the Machine who just sounded organic and at home in what they were creating in realtime instead of a odd mashup of genres which almost every other band that did the rap-rock thing did...I feel the same way about Zeal & Ardor...they're just kinda invented and defined what you're talking about so well that anyone else doing it is going to come up short or odd...

That said, I did like Graveyard....and I guess one could make a case for All Them Witches too...but neither are quite as special as Z&A


 

bdonnelly

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I think a lot of people are missing the OP's point here....putting Frissel, Oz Noy and Scofield etc etc out there - who sure have done things with the blues idiom which are "progressive" although within the very well worn rut of the 70's blues rock idiom (and I love that as much as the next guy) ...it's more really about taking the blues idiom and doing somethign else with it other than louder and more jazz notes...using it as a springboard form I suppose and not just as an existing framework of established mprovasational idioms...
 

Doomrider78

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It's kinda like asking if anyone is mixing rap and rock twenty years ago and the only real legit was Rage Against the Machine who just sounded organic and at home in what they were creating in realtime instead of a odd mashup of genres which almost every other band that did the rap-rock thing did...I feel the same way about Zeal & Ardor...they're just kinda invented and defined what you're talking about so well that anyone else doing it is going to come up short or odd...

That said, I did like Graveyard....and I guess one could make a case for All Them Witches too...but neither are quite as special as Z&A


Yeah, ATW is another good one.
 




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